Asset Mapping Visioning Dana Moore Anna Pederson November

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Asset Mapping & Visioning Dana Moore & Anna Pederson November 10, 2009 “all the

Asset Mapping & Visioning Dana Moore & Anna Pederson November 10, 2009 “all the historic evidence indicates that significant community development only takes place when local community people are committed to investing themselves and their resources in the effort. ” (Mc. Knight, 2)

Asset maps are not always geographical Allen, “Community Asset Mapping and Mobilizing Communities”, 2005.

Asset maps are not always geographical Allen, “Community Asset Mapping and Mobilizing Communities”, 2005.

Neighborhood Needs Map Mc. Knight & Kretzmann, “Mapping Community Capacity”, 1996 Neighborhood Asset Map

Neighborhood Needs Map Mc. Knight & Kretzmann, “Mapping Community Capacity”, 1996 Neighborhood Asset Map vs.

Needs vs. Assets Traditional Path 1 Alternative Path 2 Based on: Needs Assets Goal:

Needs vs. Assets Traditional Path 1 Alternative Path 2 Based on: Needs Assets Goal: Institutional Change Building Communities Conversation: Problems & Concerns Gifts and Dreams Change Agent: Power Relationships View of Individual: Consumer, Client Producer, Owner Needs = Community Problems: Assets = Community “Treasures”: Unemployment, gangs, truancy, broken families, housing shortage, crime, child abuse, illiteracy, welfare, lead poisoning, dropouts, etc. Youth, elderly, artists, churches, schools, businesses, parks, libraries, cultural groups, community colleges, clubs, hospitals, farms, ranches, etc. Allen, et al. “Vitalizing Communities: Building on Assets and Mobilizing for Collective Action” 1999

Step 1: Reality check An asset map is just the beginning of the process.

Step 1: Reality check An asset map is just the beginning of the process. Before starting with the asset map, be sure that your community is ready and willing to: 1. Participate in the asset mapping process by volunteering time and information 2. Participate in the planning once the information is available 3. Change based on the plans that have been made An asset map with no tangible results will frustrate future efforts

Types of community assets “not all community assets are equally available for community-building purposes.

Types of community assets “not all community assets are equally available for community-building purposes. ” (Mc. Knight, 3) • Located in the neighborhood and controlled by those who live in the neighborhood. • Individual capacities (including income) • Include “labeled people”: “retarded, mentally ill, disabled, elderly, etc. " • Existing and potential leaders • Organizational capacities • Located in the neighborhood but controlled elsewhere. • Located outside the neighborhood and controlled by those outside the neighborhood. Types of institutions Kinship (Family) Economic KEEPRA Education Political (Government) Religious Associations

Relationships Asset Mapping works through building relationships and connecting people => also want to

Relationships Asset Mapping works through building relationships and connecting people => also want to find existing relationships E. g. • Ask businesses about their purchasing and hiring patterns • Ask others (individuals, organizations) about their purchasing patterns as well

How to find the assets? 1. • Collect asset information: Individual Assets- Volunteers, e.

How to find the assets? 1. • Collect asset information: Individual Assets- Volunteers, e. g. students from school, collect, disseminate Associational Assets- Table of people take first cut at identifying these assets • o • • • 2. 3. 4. 5. • Table of people = group representative of community that basically serves as a steering committee for asset mapping effort Institutional Assets- Table of people take lead Economic Assets- Local bankers and business leaders take first cut at identifying. Natural Resources- Identify residents to start asset inventory process Publicize- Place asset lists in public places through out community Call “Town Hall Meeting” Citizens add to assets Organize around asset sets to create new opportunities and maintain positive aspects of community Allen, “Community Asset Community citizens are mobilized to take action Mapping & Mobilizing Communities”, 2005.

Survey forms: Example survey forms available from: Mc. Knight/Kretzmann, Allen/Cordes/Hart, Allen (2005). Beaulieu suggests

Survey forms: Example survey forms available from: Mc. Knight/Kretzmann, Allen/Cordes/Hart, Allen (2005). Beaulieu suggests an additional Community Participation & Leadership survey. Question: The introductory script for use people collecting resource information from people for the asset map proposed in the Mc. Knight & Kretzmann article includes that the information would be kept confidential. How would you be able to keep information confidential and still mobilize resources? Hello. I’m _____________ with the _______. We’re talking to local people about what skills they have. With this information, we hope to help people start businesses. I’d like to ask you some questions about your skills and where you have used them. Your participation is voluntary, and the information is confidential.

What to do with this information? Step 1: Map The Assets Step 2: Build

What to do with this information? Step 1: Map The Assets Step 2: Build Relationships and Broaden the Local Leadership • • • Find/create organizations to act as "Asset Development Organizations” Locate the capacity finders, community developers, and “strangers”; make sure all are included Create skills banks, learning exchanges => personal connections & talent pools Step 3: Mobilize for Economic Development • How can the community produce internally what has been produced externally, export goods and services? Step 4: Convene the Community and Develop a Vision for the Future • Use previous efforts, needs assessments, etc. to inform the vision and strategy building process Step 5: Leverage Outside Resources to Support Local Priority Activities • Work from a position of strength to develop partnerships and direct how outside resources are used to support vision Step 6: Evaluate Progress Step 7: Celebrate Progress!!!

Example: South Sacramento Started with visioning Then mapped assets with vision in mind •

Example: South Sacramento Started with visioning Then mapped assets with vision in mind • Did not attempt to map individuals’ assets Then workgroups developed workplans to use resources to make positive changes, e. g. relationships between: • Different cultural groups within neighborhood twith little previous communication • Residents, businesses, and police • Businesses, community groups and schools Commitment to re-assessing and re-visioning

Example: Envision Flemington http: //www. mappler. com/flemingtonvision Designed to help residents “envision” Use of

Example: Envision Flemington http: //www. mappler. com/flemingtonvision Designed to help residents “envision” Use of a map to collect comments, pictures, and/or video clips from residents about: • • Assets Suggestions

Example: Re-constructing the urban landscape through community mapping by Frances Fahy and Michael O

Example: Re-constructing the urban landscape through community mapping by Frances Fahy and Michael O Cinneide Article discusses the use of asset mapping for sustainable development in Galway, Ireland Other tools for use: ecological footprinting, visioning, environmental impact assessment, best practices, and sustainability indicators

Community asset mapping Google Earth helped bring “mapping to the masses” Community asset maps

Community asset mapping Google Earth helped bring “mapping to the masses” Community asset maps are “locally produced visual depictions of an area that record and promote social, environmental, and cultural resources” - shows what people value in their community Allows a community to identify and record elements that require attention Helps citizens develop a sense of identity with their community

Green Mapping Green maps are locally produced charts that identify, promote and link elements

Green Mapping Green maps are locally produced charts that identify, promote and link elements of the natural and cultural elements of a community Highlight green areas, bicycle paths, green businesses, and organic markets

Galway City Project Initiated by the Galway City Council to progress sustainable development policies

Galway City Project Initiated by the Galway City Council to progress sustainable development policies at a local level Used to: identify particular needs within communities and broader city jurisdictions, create benchmarks for local communities and municipal authorities to identify sustainable development targets and monitor the progress of the targets Community mapping allows participation from community members Important for the project to represent cultural diversity and include marginalized groups

Context Galway has been working on sustainable development since 2000, created the Galway City

Context Galway has been working on sustainable development since 2000, created the Galway City Development Board Previous to community mapping project, Galway City participated in a evaluation project with the National University of Ireland the Irish EPA The project aim was to investigate perceptions of quality of life in Galway Results found that city government does not communicate sustainable development issues within municipal groups and to citizens

Project Method and Findings Community mapping was suggested as one way to fix the

Project Method and Findings Community mapping was suggested as one way to fix the communication problem Project was started by holding workshops throughout the city within various socio-economic groups Elements identified: walking and bicycling routes, recycling centers, organic markets and churches The results of the workshops were turned into a map by local university researchers and put on display on city website The map was continuously updated based on suggestions from citizens

Findings (continued) Project created a two-way dialogue between local communities and municipal authorities The

Findings (continued) Project created a two-way dialogue between local communities and municipal authorities The government created a high level of publicity for the map – showed that the government valued citizen imput

Conclusion Key features of the process include sharing lived experiences, raising awareness and increasing

Conclusion Key features of the process include sharing lived experiences, raising awareness and increasing knowledge about local areas Increased community participation in creation of new geography Improved dialogue and trust between the city and citizens

Green Mapping Resources Green Map System, Inc. : http: //www. greenmap. org/ Greenopolis (social

Green Mapping Resources Green Map System, Inc. : http: //www. greenmap. org/ Greenopolis (social networking site): http: //greenopolis. com/ Natural Connections: http: //www. greenmapping. org/ Wikipedia – Green Map: http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Green_Map Green Mapping for Eco-Justice in Harlem: http: //www. earthinstitute. columbia. edu/articles/view/2525

Now for a local example… Engaging and Empowering Youth – Identifying and mapping opportunities

Now for a local example… Engaging and Empowering Youth – Identifying and mapping opportunities for youth in CU: http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=vx. WOXpi. BUqk Background: http: //will. illinois. edu/pressroom/item/teens-research-assets -they-can-use/ http: //www. ideals. illinois. edu/bitstream/handle/2142/13455/ QI_YCI_final. pdf? sequence=2

References: Allen, J. C. , Cordes, S. M. , & Hart, J. G. (2004).

References: Allen, J. C. , Cordes, S. M. , & Hart, J. G. (2004). “Vitalizing Communities”: Building on Assets and Mobilizing for Collective Action: Facilitator Guide. http: //www. nlc. state. ne. us/epubs/U 2031/H 003 -2004. pdf, accessed 10/31/09. Great how-to, but a bit long. Allen, J. C. (2005). Community Asset Mapping and Mobilizing Communities. http: //extension. usu. edu/files/publication/pub__2880457. pdf, accessed 11/01/09. Many forms for asset mapping, including filled out examples. Beaulieu, L. J. (2002). Mapping the assets of your community: A key component for building local capacity. http: //srdc. msstate. edu/publications/227_asset_mapping. pdf, accessed 10/31/09. Envision Flemington. http: //www. mappler. com/flemingtonvision, accessed 11/08/09. Example of online interactive community mapping. Fahy, F. , Cinnéide, M. Re-constructing the urban landscape through community mapping: an attractive prospect for sustainability? Area (2009) 41: 2, 167 -175. http: //www. ingentaconnect. com/content/bpl/area/2009/00000041/00000002/art 00006, accessed 11/01/09. Mc. Knight, J. L. , Kretzmann, J. P. (1992). Mapping Community Capacity. http: //www. northwestern. edu/ipr/publications/papers/mcc. pdf, accessed 10/24/09. How-to by the people who developed asset mapping. Sacramento ENRICHES (Engaging Neighborhood Resources to Improve Children’s Health, Education and Safety) & Shapiro Consulting. (2005). South Sacramento Community Initiative Asset-Based Community Plan. http: //www. msa 2. saccounty. net/dns/CSASouth/South. Sac/Documents/ABCDPlan. pdf, accessed 11/08/09. Example of visioning + asset mapping. Sustainable Jersey. Community Asset Mapping. http: //www. sustainablejersey. com/editor/doc/act 11 tb 1 sa 1. pdf, accessed 10/31/09. Includes list of several “green” mapping activities.