Psychologically Informed Environments Creating a Psychologically Informed Environment

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Psychologically Informed Environments Creating a Psychologically Informed Environment in Sheltered / Extra Care Housing

Psychologically Informed Environments Creating a Psychologically Informed Environment in Sheltered / Extra Care Housing Andy Warriner - Area Manager, Places for People 16 th September 2015

Psychologically Informed Environments… PIE t n e r e f f i d A

Psychologically Informed Environments… PIE t n e r e f f i d A IE P f o e p y t

Psychologically Informed Environments PIEs aim to create: “an empowering and calming environment where people

Psychologically Informed Environments PIEs aim to create: “an empowering and calming environment where people can feel emotionally as well as physically safe, and can gain an understanding of their behaviour and an ability to take responsibility for themselves. ” Peter Cockersell Director of Health and Recovery St Mungo’s

Psychologically Informed Environments Key areas to consider: • Psychological Framework - holistic • Environment

Psychologically Informed Environments Key areas to consider: • Psychological Framework - holistic • Environment – staff and customers • Staff Training / Support • Managing Relationships • Evaluation of Outcomes

Psychologically Informed Environments Why? Ø Staff development, well being & increased set of skills

Psychologically Informed Environments Why? Ø Staff development, well being & increased set of skills e. g. greater awareness of some psychological theories and application of these Ø Customers with a higher threshold of needs/ complex needs presenting at services/ schemes Ø Increase in issues related to substance misuse / mental health Ø Fits with the culture / ethos (SPIRIT values) of Places for People

Psychologically Informed Environments Complex Trauma & Associated Behaviours • Major life events e. g.

Psychologically Informed Environments Complex Trauma & Associated Behaviours • Major life events e. g. bereavement, homelessness, relationship breakdown • Long term health conditions • Uncontrolled substance misuse e. g. alcohol use • Withdrawn, reluctant to engage / isolated • Anti-social behaviour • Lacking daily structure or routine • Unstable / inability to sustain relationships

Psychologically Informed Environments How? 4 stages Research CLG Good practice guide and Robin Johnson,

Psychologically Informed Environments How? 4 stages Research CLG Good practice guide and Robin Johnson, RJA Consultancy Training bespoke sessions for managers/team leaders & cascade training Embed Business plan/ongoing training/support & role of champions Monitor and review Current position & longer term evaluation & validation

Psychologically Informed Environments What? 4 main aspects to the approach Ø Psychology theory &

Psychologically Informed Environments What? 4 main aspects to the approach Ø Psychology theory & mental health awareness / recovery approach Ø Skills – mental health & person centred support planning tools & outcome based support planning Ø Creating an enabling environment Ø Reflective Practice –consistent approach

Psychologically Informed Environments What difference? Ø Improved customer engagement Ø Improved customer outcomes –

Psychologically Informed Environments What difference? Ø Improved customer engagement Ø Improved customer outcomes – health & wellbeing & reduction in incidents/ ASB Ø Services able to support customers with higher complex needs for longer Ø Improved staff engagement & morale Ø Improved physical / cultural environment Ø Tenancy sustainment Ø Reduced hospital admissions

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples – Improved outcomes Salford Foyer Project (16 -25 year olds)

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples – Improved outcomes Salford Foyer Project (16 -25 year olds) • Support staff held reflective practice sessions with local Drugs & Alcohol Team / shared PIE learning Outcomes: • Staff delivering level 1 screening & level 2 interventions to customers by using tools used in PIE approach e. g. motivational interviewing, chain analysis and force field analysis, wheel of change. • Approx 50% reduction in incidents and Anti-social behaviour • Higher levels of customer engagement • Lower threshold needs met

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples - continued Bristol Complex Needs Service model includes a part

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples - continued Bristol Complex Needs Service model includes a part time Reflective Practice Manager and a part time Substance Misuse Counsellor. Outcomes: • Onsite advice • Initial assessments for treatment processed quickly • Lower referral refusal rates- able to support higher complex needs

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples - continued Older Persons PIE • Further customised training for

Psychologically Informed Environments Examples - continued Older Persons PIE • Further customised training for older person staff to make the PIE concept meaningful for them • Application of 'elastic tolerance' principle • Revised practices in procurement of furniture, furnishings and redecoration • Allocation policy review

Thank you ANY QUESTIONS ? Contact details: Andy. warriner@placesforpeople. co. uk

Thank you ANY QUESTIONS ? Contact details: Andy. [email protected] co. uk

Useful links Johnson R & Haigh R, (2011) “Social Psychiatry and Social Policy for

Useful links Johnson R & Haigh R, (2011) “Social Psychiatry and Social Policy for the 21 st Century - new concepts for new needs: enabling environments” in Mental Health & Social Inclusion, Vol 15 Issue 1. Available at: http: //www. rjaconsultancy. org. uk/publications. html. Keats H, Cockersell P, Johnson R & Maguire N (2012) Psychologically informed services for homeless people (Good Practice Guide) Now available at: http: //www. rjaconsultancy. org. uk/PIEconcept. html Peter Cockersell, (2011), "More for less? Using PIEs and recovery to improve efficiency in supported housing", Housing, Care and Support, Vol. 14 Issue: 2 pp. 45 – 50