Writing Lab Sentence Fragments Sentence Fragments A sentence

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Writing Lab Sentence Fragments

Writing Lab Sentence Fragments

Sentence Fragments • A sentence fragment is an incomplete construction which may or may

Sentence Fragments • A sentence fragment is an incomplete construction which may or may not have a subject and a verb. • Specifically, a fragment is a group of words pretending to be a sentence. It is punctuated and capitalized as if it were a sentence, and it may even have a subject and a verb.

Sentence Fragments cont. • Although sentence fragments are common, fragments are usually unacceptable in

Sentence Fragments cont. • Although sentence fragments are common, fragments are usually unacceptable in academic and professional writing. • Some fragments are intentional. Skillful writers use them for emphasis, for answers to questions, for transitions, for exclamations, and for advertising jingles. • Since writers and readers do not always agree on when fragments are intentional, it is always safer to write in complete sentences.

Dependent Clause • The dependent clause is one of the most common sentence fragments.

Dependent Clause • The dependent clause is one of the most common sentence fragments. Although a dependent clause has a subject and a verb, it is always introduced by a subordinating conjunction (as, as if, although, since, because, while, until, before, if, when) or a relative pronoun (who, which, that) and thus cannot be treated as a complete thought.

Correcting Fragments • Join a dependent clause to an independent clause, or make the

Correcting Fragments • Join a dependent clause to an independent clause, or make the dependent clause into an independent one. • Incorrect: The study showed that many employees eventually begin to neglect their duties. Because they become bored with their jobs. • Correct: The study showed that many employees eventually begin to neglect their duties because they become bored with their jobs.

Let’s Practice! • Incorrect: The two girls next door, although they mean well and

Let’s Practice! • Incorrect: The two girls next door, although they mean well and do not realize that their constant borrowing of sugar, eggs, and milk and their inquisitiveness about everyone else in the apartment complex. • Correct: The two girls next door, although they mean well and do not realize that their constant borrowing of sugar, eggs, and milk and their inquisitiveness about everyone else in the apartment complex are annoying, are, fortunately, quiet.

Let’s Practice! cont. • Incorrect: Marcy was excited about working in Washington. But was

Let’s Practice! cont. • Incorrect: Marcy was excited about working in Washington. But was also somewhat apprehensive. • Correct: Marcy was excited about working in Washington but was also somewhat apprehensive. • Incorrect: Dorothy and her friends went to Emerald City. Singing and Dancing down Yellowbrick Road. • Correct: Singing and dancing down Yellowbrick Road, Dorothy and her friends went to Emerald City.

Let’s Practice! cont. 2 • Incorrect: His immediate aim in life is centered around

Let’s Practice! cont. 2 • Incorrect: His immediate aim in life is centered around two things. Becoming an engineer and learning to fly an airplane. • Correct: His immediate aim in life is centered around two things, becoming an engineer and learning to fly an airplane. • Incorrect: You should not make such statements; although they are correct. • Correct: You should not make such statements, although they are correct.

Let’s Practice! cont. 3 • Incorrect: Not for all the tea in China. I

Let’s Practice! cont. 3 • Incorrect: Not for all the tea in China. I won’t do it. • Correct: I won’t do it for all the tea in China. • Incorrect: I categorically refuse to abide by these ridiculous rules. Whether you like it or not. • Correct: I categorically refuse to abide by these ridiculous rules whether you like it or not.

That’s all, folks! • This lesson is part of the UWF Writing Lab Grammar

That’s all, folks! • This lesson is part of the UWF Writing Lab Grammar Mini-Lesson Series • Lessons adapted from Real Good Grammar, Too by Mamie Webb Hixon • To find out more, visit the Writing Lab’s website where you can take a self-scoring quiz corresponding to this lesson