What is Depression Niamh Rooney Trainee Cognitive Behavioural

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What is Depression? Niamh Rooney Trainee Cognitive Behavioural Therapist 28/01/15

What is Depression? Niamh Rooney Trainee Cognitive Behavioural Therapist 28/01/15

Depression can happen to anyone - and does happen to one in four of

Depression can happen to anyone - and does happen to one in four of us over our lifetimes. Different factors that make it more likely to happen: • biological make-up • upbringing • reaction to life events What keeps it going though, is how we deal with those things. The way we think and what we do affects the way we feel.

Thoughts • People with depression tend to think about themselves, others and the future

Thoughts • People with depression tend to think about themselves, others and the future in a negative way. Looking at the world through “dirty glasses” Negative thoughts: • Everything is hopeless - nothing can change • I'm useless, worthless • It's all my fault • The world is a terrible place - everything goes wrong People dwell on these thoughts, mulling things over and over.

Physical sensations • • • Tiredness, fatigue, lethargy Difficulty concentrating or remembering Sleep changes

Physical sensations • • • Tiredness, fatigue, lethargy Difficulty concentrating or remembering Sleep changes (sleep more or less) Eating changes (eat more or less) Lose interest in hobbies, activities, sex

Behaviours Due to all the Physical symptoms we tend to do less and less.

Behaviours Due to all the Physical symptoms we tend to do less and less. We stop doing things we used to enjoy and love. At times it gets so bad you no longer go to work or socialise with family and friends Getting out off bed can be a struggle

Unhelpful coping strategies • In the UK people who experience anxiety or depression are

Unhelpful coping strategies • In the UK people who experience anxiety or depression are twice as likely to be heavy or problem drinkers. • For some people, the anxiety or depression came first and they’ve reached for alcohol to try to relieve it. • Regular drinking lowers the levels of serotonin in your brain – a chemical that helps to regulate your mood. Talk to someone about your worries. Don’t try and mask them with alcohol.

Breaking the cycle Just increasing our activity and exercise levels can make an enormous

Breaking the cycle Just increasing our activity and exercise levels can make an enormous impact on our mood as it stimulates the body to produce natural antidepressants (Endorphins) Ha

 • • • Making us feel better about ourselves Making us feel less

• • • Making us feel better about ourselves Making us feel less tired Motivating us to do more Improving our ability to think more clearly Helping us think about something other than focussing on our unhelpful thoughts Using up the adrenaline resources created by anxiety and anger Giving us a sense of achievement Enjoyment Being with other people

Activities should give you a sense of: Closeness Achievement to others Enjoyment

Activities should give you a sense of: Closeness Achievement to others Enjoyment

Doing things differently If lack of activity and tiredness is helping to maintain our

Doing things differently If lack of activity and tiredness is helping to maintain our negative thinking, and therefore keeping us depressed, then doing more (in spite of feeling tired and depressed) will help us feel better.

Extra Support • • GP Pharmacist Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Self- Help books and websites

Extra Support • • GP Pharmacist Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Self- Help books and websites (get. gg) • Local substance use services