Using Rubrics for Assessment in Blackboard Ellen Maddin

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Using Rubrics for Assessment in Blackboard Ellen Maddin Teacher Education

Using Rubrics for Assessment in Blackboard Ellen Maddin Teacher Education

What is a rubric? • A rubric is a tool for evaluating an assignment,

What is a rubric? • A rubric is a tool for evaluating an assignment, a task or a performance. • With a well-designed rubric, an instructor can communicate expectations for an assignment, provide focused feedback on works in progress, and evaluate final products.

BENEFITS OF RUBRICS

BENEFITS OF RUBRICS

CLARIFY THE LEARNING TARGET(S) When students know the target, they are better equipped to

CLARIFY THE LEARNING TARGET(S) When students know the target, they are better equipped to hit it. This is especially true of complex tasks.

GUIDE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND DELIVERY • Taking time to clearly define what students are

GUIDE INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND DELIVERY • Taking time to clearly define what students are to learn and to identify what must be demonstrated as evidence of that learning will strengthen instructional delivery. • The "think work" involved in rubric construction helps the professor to stay focused on the important elements of the course content.

INCREASE THE ACCURACY AND FAIRNESS OF ASSESSMENT • Using a rubric will most likely

INCREASE THE ACCURACY AND FAIRNESS OF ASSESSMENT • Using a rubric will most likely result in a more consistent approach to scoring student work. • Rubrics help instructors to anchor their judgments by continually drawing their attention back to the key criteria in the assignment or performance. • There is less likelihood that the scoring will vary from student to student.

TOOLS FOR SELF-ASSESSMENT AND PEER FEEDBACK • Rubrics allow students to critique their own

TOOLS FOR SELF-ASSESSMENT AND PEER FEEDBACK • Rubrics allow students to critique their own performances, a valuable professional skill worthy in and of itself. • Classmates can give one another formative feedback on work in progress. • Peer review also helps students to internalize the rubric criteria and become better at applying this understanding to their own work.

SHOW POTENTIAL FOR ADVANCING THE WORK OF STUDENTS OF COLOR, NON -TRADITIONAL STUDENTS, AND

SHOW POTENTIAL FOR ADVANCING THE WORK OF STUDENTS OF COLOR, NON -TRADITIONAL STUDENTS, AND FIRSTGENERATION STUDENTS • Cultural assumptions may lead instructors to behave as though everyone has an understanding of the expectations for academic performance. • Rubrics level the playing field by making expectations clear and known to everyone in the room. .

STEPS FOR DESIGNING RUBRICS

STEPS FOR DESIGNING RUBRICS

IDENTIFY PERFORMANCE CRITERIA • The performance criteria are also known as the dimensions of

IDENTIFY PERFORMANCE CRITERIA • The performance criteria are also known as the dimensions of the rubric. • What are the key features of the assignment or performance task? • Somewhere between three and six criteria will work well for the rubric.

SET PERFORMANCE LEVELS • Decide how many levels of quality are appropriate for the

SET PERFORMANCE LEVELS • Decide how many levels of quality are appropriate for the assignment or performance task. (Three to four levels of quality are typically found in a rubric that will be used formative assessment. ) • You can use word labels--such as beginning, developing, and accomplished--or you can use numbered levels--such as 1, 2, and 3.

WRITE DESCRIPTIONS • In each cell of the rubric grid, you will need a

WRITE DESCRIPTIONS • In each cell of the rubric grid, you will need a description that captures the level of quality for the criterion being evaluated. • Each description should be written in parallel structure. The more consistent the descriptions are, the more reliable and accessible the tool will be.

ANALYTIC OR HOLISTIC? • With an analytic process, criteria scores are calculated -- either

ANALYTIC OR HOLISTIC? • With an analytic process, criteria scores are calculated -- either by adding them together, calculating, an average, or applying a weighted formula. • With a holistic judgment, the evaluator considers each score and then blends them into an overall judgment based on the strength of the performance.

EXAMPLES

EXAMPLES

Begin by identifying the dimensions (criteria) of the rubric. What are the most important

Begin by identifying the dimensions (criteria) of the rubric. What are the most important elements of this task?

How many levels of quality do you need? The default in Bb is three

How many levels of quality do you need? The default in Bb is three – but you can add or remove a column.

3. 2. Write the descriptions for each of the criterion. Start with the highest

3. 2. Write the descriptions for each of the criterion. Start with the highest level of quality and move backward. 1.

You can change the weight for each of the criterion. You can also determine

You can change the weight for each of the criterion. You can also determine how much credit to give for each level of quality.

LET’S CREATE A RUBRIC!

LET’S CREATE A RUBRIC!

Begin by creating an assignment. After establishing the point value, you can create a

Begin by creating an assignment. After establishing the point value, you can create a new rubric.

Add rows to increase the number of dimensions in the rubric. Add (or remove)

Add rows to increase the number of dimensions in the rubric. Add (or remove) columns to adjust levels of quality.

REFERENCES Wolf, K. & Stevens, S. (2007). The role of rubrics in advancing and

REFERENCES Wolf, K. & Stevens, S. (2007). The role of rubrics in advancing and assessing student learning. Journal of Effective Teaching, 7(1), 3 -14. Stiggins, R. (2001). Student-Involved Classroom Assessment (3 rd ed. ). New York: Merrill. Schrock, K. (n. d. ). Assessment and rubrics. Schrock’s Guide to Everything. Retrieved from http: //www. schrockguide. net/assessment-andrubrics. html