UPRRriver Prock X CDR November 23 2010 Presentation

  • Slides: 75
Download presentation
UPR-R(river) P(rock) X CDR, November 23, 2010 Presentation Version 1. 3 2011 Co. DR

UPR-R(river) P(rock) X CDR, November 23, 2010 Presentation Version 1. 3 2011 Co. DR 1

Mission Overview • Mission Statement In representation of the University of Puerto Rico, as

Mission Overview • Mission Statement In representation of the University of Puerto Rico, as a team we intend to get involved in the pilot project Rock. Sat X 2011 to expand our knowledge and that of others in aerospace related areas. Carefully selected, the experiment that will be carried out includes mass spectroscopy to analyze molecular species and their respective partial pressures in near space. In this way we will contribute with valuable information for interstellar travel and advances benefiting the space bound crew to collect and replenish essential resources such as water and fuel. 2011 Co. DR 2

Mission Overview Carrying out this experiment involves a set of minimum requirements. Our main

Mission Overview Carrying out this experiment involves a set of minimum requirements. Our main tool will be a mass spectrometer that will identify molecular species from 1 to 200 amu. Computers need to be modified and communication established with them by telemetry. This is one of the most important requisites needed to carry out the project properly. It is also necessary to have a basic knowledge of science in the areas of chemistry and physics to understand several events/concepts that will be taking place. 2011 Co. DR 3

Mission Overview • In this experiment, we expect to determine the abundance of different

Mission Overview • In this experiment, we expect to determine the abundance of different types of gas molecules, that exist in the outer atmosphere, and near to outer space, using mass spectroscopy. • We want to encourage future space voyagers to use gas molecules present in outer space to capture or synthesize necessary resources, such as water and fuel. 2011 Co. DR 4

Mission Overview • Our data would be used as preliminary information about what type

Mission Overview • Our data would be used as preliminary information about what type of molecular gases are found, at what altitude, and with what density. • Having the basic data about gases in outer space, scientists can develop or apply mechanisms to start converting gas molecules, or atoms to make the necessary resources needed in long distance space flights. 2011 Co. DR 5

Team Rock. Sat Team Organization Oscar Resto (Mentor/PI) Omar Rocafort (Leader) Gladys Muniz (Mentor)

Team Rock. Sat Team Organization Oscar Resto (Mentor/PI) Omar Rocafort (Leader) Gladys Muniz (Mentor) Pedro Melendez (Software Technical Leader) Guillermo Nery (Faculty Support) Ricardo Morales (Faculty Support) Yashira Torres (Secretary) Marisara Morales (Timekeeper) Marimer Soto (Team Member) Joshua Nieves (Team Member) Angelica Betancourt (Team Member) Oscar A. Resto (Team Member) But we insist, We ARE a team!!! Esteban Romero (Hardware Technical Leader) Joseph Casillas (Team Member) Luis Maldonado (Team Member) Carlos Rodriguez (Team Member)

Theory and Concepts 2011 Co. DR 7

Theory and Concepts 2011 Co. DR 7

Mass Spectrometry [MS] • The Mass Spectrometry (MS) is an instrumental analytical method used

Mass Spectrometry [MS] • The Mass Spectrometry (MS) is an instrumental analytical method used to determine atomic masses using the combined properties of mass and electric charge to detect and measure the relative abundances of atomic and molecular species. The instrument will also measure the total amount of gas and the partial pressures of the species studied could be also be determined. • Identify substances by electric charge/mass ratio: – Positively charge the molecules (ionize them). – Accelerate the ions through an alternating electromagnetic field that acts as a filter. – Detect the number of charged species vs. atomic mass. 8

How the instrument works: Magnetic Filter Some limitations: • Big and Heavy magnet •

How the instrument works: Magnetic Filter Some limitations: • Big and Heavy magnet • Limited Flexibility Electro-Magnetic Filter Some Advantage • Small and lighter ionizer and quadruple • More flexible to modifies to this experimentation 9

How the instrument works (1): Step 1 Create the ions • Measure the amount

How the instrument works (1): Step 1 Create the ions • Measure the amount of the gas • Measure the amount of the electrons that pass through by the source grid • Measure the partial pressure • Produce a beam of electrons [70 e. V] creating ions of the species • Create a magnetic potential to accelerate the ions through the quadruple 10

How the instrument works (2): Step 2 Filter the ions • A quadruple mass

How the instrument works (2): Step 2 Filter the ions • A quadruple mass filter consisting of an arrangement of 4 metal rods with a timevarying electrical voltage of the proper amplitude and frequency applied • This mechanism helps us to select which ions will pass by his charge which is relative to their masses. • The instrument can be program to scan only selected mass, applying a specific current, move and measure only the mass that we want to measure. 11 • Or can scan all the mass to 1 – 200 amu and see what we have in the time.

How the instrument works (3): Step 3 Detect the filtered ions • The ions

How the instrument works (3): Step 3 Detect the filtered ions • The ions that pass through the mass filter are focused toward a Faraday cup and the current is measured with a sensitive ammeter. • The resultant signal being proportional to the partial pressure of the 12 particular ion species passed by the mass filter.

How the instrument works (4): Step 4 Amplify the signal • Amplifies the current

How the instrument works (4): Step 4 Amplify the signal • Amplifies the current that the faraday cup receive approximately 10 -14 amps. • The ions striking the B/A detector wire produce a comparatively larger current, on the order of 10 -9 13 amps at 3. 3 x 10 -7 Torr.

Expected results • MS outputs results in an integrated mass spectrum with all identifiable

Expected results • MS outputs results in an integrated mass spectrum with all identifiable species represented by characteristic fragments of specific mass/charge ratio in specific proportions. • Analyze the results to know what species are in the lower to outer space. – Verify atmospheric composition. – Identify possible sources of energy and/or useful materials. 2011 Co. DR 14

Expected gases in our atmosphere N 2, O 2, Ar, CO 2 He, Ne,

Expected gases in our atmosphere N 2, O 2, Ar, CO 2 He, Ne, Kr, Xe, H 2, N 2 O CH 4, O 3, H 2 O, CO, NO 2, NH 3, SO 2, H 2 S Concentration of N 2, O 2, O 3, He Aurora (80 km to 160 km) 2011 15 Co. DR 17

From the Literature There a lots of species that we expect to find, all

From the Literature There a lots of species that we expect to find, all of them in different concentration in function of altitude. In a mass spectrum ionic species are represented by their mass/charge ratio in the x-axis and their relative abundance and the y-axis. From the literature we found an example of a combined mass spectrum of several species. Mass Spectrum (log intensity scale) of gases in the atmosphere of Mars. (MCLafferty, 1993) 16 2011 Co. DR 18

Other examples of single species’ mass spectrum- Ideal cases: Mass spectrum for Mass spectrum

Other examples of single species’ mass spectrum- Ideal cases: Mass spectrum for Mass spectrum for bithylene methane (CH 3), bethane (C 2 H 3) and isotope of (C 2 H 4) and an isotope of hydrocarbons Mass spectrum for neon (Ne) and its isotopes. (C 4 H 7). (C 6 H 7). (MCLafferty, 1993) 17

Now, why two Mass Spectrums? • Analyzing the expected results, we conclude that we

Now, why two Mass Spectrums? • Analyzing the expected results, we conclude that we need two different MS. In the first one, it’s quadruple will measures all masses between 1 and 200 amu, to see all the species and their fragments that are in the outer space. In the second one, it’s quadruple will measures just the masses that we select to look, programming the instrument. This will help to verify the composition of the atmosphere.

Examples of possible species to be found in the atmosphere, relative masses for molecular

Examples of possible species to be found in the atmosphere, relative masses for molecular and atomic components: 19

NRLMSISE-00 – Model of the Atmosphere • NRLMSISE-00 is an empirical, global model of

NRLMSISE-00 – Model of the Atmosphere • NRLMSISE-00 is an empirical, global model of the Earth's atmosphere from ground to space. It models the temperatures and densities of the atmosphere's components. According to the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory website, NRLMSISE-00 is the standard for international space research. Model outputs: Model inputs: • Year and day • time of day • altitude • geodetic latitude • geodetic longitude • local apparent solar time • 81 day average of F 10. 7 solar flux • daily F 10. 7 solar flux for previous day • Daily magnetic index http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/NRLMSISE-00 • Helium Number density • Oxygen(O) Number density • Oxygen (O 2) Number density • Nitrogen (N 2) Number density • Argon (Ar) Number density • Hydrogen (H) Number density • total mass density • Anomalous oxygen Number density • Exospheric temperature 20 • temperature at altitude

Example of NRLMSISE-00 output http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/NRLMSISE-00 21

Example of NRLMSISE-00 output http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/NRLMSISE-00 21

Example Con. Ops t ≈ 1. 7 min Altitude: 120 km t ≈ 4.

Example Con. Ops t ≈ 1. 7 min Altitude: 120 km t ≈ 4. 0 min Re. Scan, Deployment of secong MS Altitude: 120 km Apogee t ≈ 1. 3 min Altitude: 95 km t ≈ 2. 8 min Star Ionizing, Mass Spectra Altitude: ≈160 km End of Orion Burn and Filaments ON t ≈ 0. 6 min t = 0 min -G switch triggered Start recovery sequences Altitude: 60 km -All systems on t ≈ 4. 5 min Altitude: 95 km Retract Complete t ≈ 5. 5 min Chute Deploys t ≈ 15 min Splash Down

System Overview 2011 Co. DR 23

System Overview 2011 Co. DR 23

Subsystem Overview 2011 Co. DR

Subsystem Overview 2011 Co. DR

Critical Interface Name Brief Description Potential Solution RGA 1 probe The RGA 1 will

Critical Interface Name Brief Description Potential Solution RGA 1 probe The RGA 1 will be mounted vertically with the boom arm attached to it. Support and protection will be fundamental to get to apogee with no failure. The RGA main support will be mounted on the floor of the Rock. Sat X deck. The RGA will be held together by a circular tube of aluminum or stainless steelthat will withstand the 50 G’s presumed to be sustained by the rocket. RGA 2 probe The RGA 2 will be mounted vertically with the boom arm attached to it. Support and protection will be fundamental to get to apogee with no failure. The RGA main support will be mounted on the floor of the Rock. Sat X deck. The RGA will be held together by a circular tube of aluminum or stainless steelthat will withstand the 50 G’s presumed to be sustained by the rocket. RGA 1 CCU It will be mounted at the center of the first floor of Rock. Sat X deck and will be connected through wires to the RGA sensor 1 It will be mounted at the center of the second floor of Rock. Sat X deck and will be connected through wires to the RGA sensor 2 It will be mounted on the third floor of Rock. Sat X deck. It will be connected to both board stacks. It will receive all the data and will record and send it back thru the telemetry to us down on earth. This part is on the third floor also. Regulating voltage of the all the parts. 2011 For additional space probably will remove the case that protects the board. Because we believe it will not be necessary and occupies necessary space. The connections of the wired will be all over the floors. So we will organize the running of the wires and glue then good so the vibrations won’t break any connections to the boards Still we don’t have a perfect size of it, but it will be built. RGA 2 CCU x 86 Computer DC-DC power supply Co. DR

System Level Block Diagram 2011 Co. DR

System Level Block Diagram 2011 Co. DR

Requirement Verification Method Description Boom extension will deploy maximum 18”. It will too withstand

Requirement Verification Method Description Boom extension will deploy maximum 18”. It will too withstand the vibration test. Demonstration of it functionality Boom will drop from vertical position to horizontal position and extend 12” for a total of 24”. Later on to retract to its original state. Total voltage of equipment and complete functionality of the DC-DC converter. Experimentation of the whole system ready for launch Ones all the parts are assembled , build and connected they will be turned on as it were for flight. Then the current will be measured for total voltage. Support for the RGA 1 & 2 sensors must hold the complete vibration test. Vibration test date on WFF First designing a strong structure and use materials strong enough to support the vibration test Software Running a simulate launch Ones the software has been edited and uploaded. We will run a simulation to see if it works. 2011 Co. DR

Subsystem Design 2011 Co. DR 28

Subsystem Design 2011 Co. DR 28

Block Diagram Primary Components of the functional diagram. Legend 2011 Co. DR

Block Diagram Primary Components of the functional diagram. Legend 2011 Co. DR

Trade Studies • Embedded x 86 computer mainboard q VIA EPIA P 820 -12

Trade Studies • Embedded x 86 computer mainboard q VIA EPIA P 820 -12 L Pico ITX Mainboard q VIA EITX-3001 Em-ITX • DC-DC Converter q Intelligent DC-DC converter with USB interface • I/O Board q RS-232 Relay Controller 4 -Channel 5 Amp SPDT + 8 -Channel 8/10 -Bit A/D q RS-232 4 -Channel Solid State Relay Controller + 8 -Channel 8/10 -Bit A/D • Data storage q OCZ Onyx Series OCZSSD 1 -1 ONX 32 G 1. 8" 32 GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive 2011 Co. DR

Trade Studies • For mainboard considering cost, number serial ports, power requirements and form

Trade Studies • For mainboard considering cost, number serial ports, power requirements and form factor, option A for the prototype will be VIA EITX-3001 Em-ITX. • For I/O Board considering cost, configuration options and form factor, option A for the prototype will be RS-232 Relay Controller 4 Channel 5 Amp SPDT + 8 -Channel 8/10 -Bit A/D which has more option for configuring the relay and has a smaller footprint. 2011 Co. DR

Risk Matrix Risk 4 Risk 1 Consequence Risk 2 Risk 3 Possibility Risk 1

Risk Matrix Risk 4 Risk 1 Consequence Risk 2 Risk 3 Possibility Risk 1 – Computer system crash during flight and data couldn’t be collected mission objectives couldn’t be completed. Risk 2 – A boom arm failure during deployment occurs and probe performs measurements inside the payload. Risk 3 – Telemetry error between x 86 computer and wallops leaving experiment data only on the payload storage which will have survive landing on the sea. Risk 4 – Power failure on some of the component making funtionability limited. 2011 Co. DR

Design Description 2011 Co. DR 33

Design Description 2011 Co. DR 33

River Rock X Sketch Diagram 2011 Co. DR 34

River Rock X Sketch Diagram 2011 Co. DR 34

De-Scopes and Off-Ramps • The scope of our project haven’t changed. • So far

De-Scopes and Off-Ramps • The scope of our project haven’t changed. • So far all our mission statements will be done in our experiment. • Concerns(In order of importance) q. Creation of the booms. q. Will the RGA survive the vibration test mounted on the booms. q. Additional power for the whole system 2011 Co. DR

Mechanical Design Elements Mechanical Front view design 2011 Co. DR

Mechanical Design Elements Mechanical Front view design 2011 Co. DR

3 d imaged 2011 Co. DR

3 d imaged 2011 Co. DR

3 D image of or payload 2011 Co. DR

3 D image of or payload 2011 Co. DR

Materials Part List and Prices • x 86 computer $88. 99 ocz ssd http:

Materials Part List and Prices • x 86 computer $88. 99 ocz ssd http: //www. newegg. com/Product. aspx? Item=N 82 E 16820227553&cm_re=ocz_ssd-_20 -227 -553 -_-Product • $369. 00 via emitx motherboard http: //www. e-itx. com/eitx-3001. html • control boards es solo uno tenemos dos opciones $124 RS-232 4 -Channel Solid State Mixed SSR Relay Controller + 8 -Channel 8/10 -Bit A/D http: //www. controlanything. com/Relay/Device/ADSSR 4 x. PROXR_MIX • $124 RS-232 Relay Controller 4 -Channel 5 Amp SPDT + 8 -Channel 8/10 -Bit A/D http: //www. controlanything. com/Relay/Device/ADR 45 PROXR • DC-DC converter $59. 95 Intelligent DC-DC converter with USB interface http: //www. minibox. com/DCDC-USB? sc=8&category=981 2011 Co. DR 39

Electrical Design Elements 2011 Co. DR

Electrical Design Elements 2011 Co. DR

Electrical Design Elements • Power lines 10 and 11 are not shown connected to

Electrical Design Elements • Power lines 10 and 11 are not shown connected to anything because this lines will power the boom arms motors which have not selected yet and because of this power requirement is to be determined • Relays R 1 -4 on the control board will be used to activate the boom arms to relays per boom. 2011 Co. DR

Software Design Elements • Software development still at its beginning • Studying of the

Software Design Elements • Software development still at its beginning • Studying of the API’s of the payload hardware • Research how to use the telemetry interfaces to achieve better results • Analyzing which procedures are needed to control the payload and collect all data correctly 2011 Co. DR 42

Software Design Elements System starts Wait for G-switch signal Set both RGAs to start

Software Design Elements System starts Wait for G-switch signal Set both RGAs to start ionizers when pressure is adequate t=1. 3 Start data collection when ready System shutdown Stop data collection t = 5. 5 Close boom on re-entry t=4. 5 Deploy boom arms when rocket skin is release 2011 Co. DR 43

Prototyping/Analysis 2011 Co. DR 44

Prototyping/Analysis 2011 Co. DR 44

Analysis Results • What was analyzed? • Boom extension was a matter of importance

Analysis Results • What was analyzed? • Boom extension was a matter of importance because of the outgassing bubble created by the rocket and the equipment on it. • The RGA’s ionizer filament survival to the launch conditions • Strong payload structure to survive launch conditions 2011 Co. DR 45

Analysis Results • Resultant design • Boom arm is needed to extend 24” to

Analysis Results • Resultant design • Boom arm is needed to extend 24” to minimize outgassing noise on reading • The RGA’s ionizer filament most be unused before launch because its crystallize after the first use • RGA’s will be mounted vertically while using a stacked confugiration for the electronics 2011 Co. DR 46

Prototyping Results In order to make the first prototype our team is waiting for

Prototyping Results In order to make the first prototype our team is waiting for the first RGA to arrive and start making mock ups of the system. 2011 Co. DR 47

Detailed Mass Budget Subsystem Total Mass (lbf) RGA 1 RGA 2 x 86 computer

Detailed Mass Budget Subsystem Total Mass (lbf) RGA 1 RGA 2 x 86 computer board * DC to DC Converter(12 V) * DC to DC Converter(24 V) * Boom assembly 1 * Boom assembly 2 * Payload Structure * 5 5 3 0. 5 2 2 10 Total Over/Under 28 -2. 00 * Estimate mass 2011 Co. DR 48

Detailed Power Budget Subsystem Computer RGA 1 RGA 2 Boom arm 1 Boom arm

Detailed Power Budget Subsystem Computer RGA 1 RGA 2 Boom arm 1 Boom arm 2 Voltage (V) 7 -36 V 24 V TBD Current (A) Time On (min) 1 2. 5 TBD Amp-Hours 0. 25 0. 29167 TBD 15 7 7 1 1 Total (A*hr): Over/Under 0. 83334 -0. 16666 Boom arm current consumption will be determine once boom arm motor are chosen. 2011 Co. DR 49

Wallops Interfacing: Power Connector--Customer Side Pin Function 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Wallops Interfacing: Power Connector--Customer Side Pin Function 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Computer Power DC to DC power in (24 V) DC to DC power in (12 V) Ground Computer Power Boom arm 1 Boom arm 2 Ground 2011 Co. DR 50

Wallops Interfacing: Telemetry Connector--Customer Side Pin Function 1 TBD 20 to mainboard parallel port

Wallops Interfacing: Telemetry Connector--Customer Side Pin Function 1 TBD 20 to mainboard parallel port 2 TBD 21 to mainboard parallel port 3 TBD 22 to mainboard parallel port 4 TBD 23 to mainboard parallel port 5 TBD 24 to mainboard parallel port 6 TBD 25 to mainboard parallel port 7 TBD 26 to mainboard parallel port 8 TBD 27 to mainboard parallel port 9 TBD 28 to mainboard parallel port 10 TBD 29 to mainboard parallel port 11 to mainboard parallel port 30 to mainboard parallel port 12 to mainboard parallel port 31 not used 13 to mainboard parallel port 32 to mainboard COM 1 14 to mainboard parallel port 33 to mainboard COM 1 15 to mainboard parallel port 34 not used 16 to mainboard parallel port 35 not used 17 not used 36 ground 18 ground 37 ground 19 ground 2011 Co. DR Analog to digital converters line are not being use in the payload design for now because all sensor communicate via serial port to the computer directly 51

User Guide Compliance Requirement Status/Reason (if needed) Center of gravity in 1" plane of

User Guide Compliance Requirement Status/Reason (if needed) Center of gravity in 1" plane of plate? TBD Max Height < 12" yes Within Keep-Out yes Using < 10 A/D Lines yes Using/Understand Parallel Line Will be use to monitor states of the experiment Using/Understand Asynchronous Line 9600 Baud Using X GSE Line(s) 1 Using X Redundant Power Lines 1 Using X Non-Redundant Power Lines 3 Using < 1 Ah Total Ah TBD Using <= 28 V 24 V & 12 V 2011 Co. DR 52

Project Management Plan 2011 Co. DR 53

Project Management Plan 2011 Co. DR 53

Work Breakdown Structure • Every member of the team cooperates and collaborates in every

Work Breakdown Structure • Every member of the team cooperates and collaborates in every part of the payload’s design and future construction. RGA’s • Purchase of RGA’s in Nov. and January • Installation of first RGA in January • Environmental testing Booms • Start working on booms in January and February • They will be constructed to lower errors in the data recollected. Plate • Start working on plate in January. • Proper installation of spectrometers in Rocksat plate. 2011 Co. DR Budget Theory • Raise a $13, 000 budget for March. • Make arrangements for acquiring the necessary materials for construction of the payload. • Have more information about our expected results. • Results would be modified, depending on the development of the model that will work with the samples. 54

Date 10/26/2010 Group Meeting for PDR 10/27/2010 Preliminary Design Review (PDR) Due 10/29/2010 Preliminary

Date 10/26/2010 Group Meeting for PDR 10/27/2010 Preliminary Design Review (PDR) Due 10/29/2010 Preliminary Design Review (PDR) Teleconference 11/02/2010 Group Meeting for CDR 11/04/2010 Group Meeting for CDR 11/09/2010 Group Meeting for CDR and Online Progress Report 2 11/12/2010 Online Progress Report 2 Due 11/17/2010 Critical Design Review (CDR) Due 11/19/2010 Critical Design Review (CDR) Teleconference 11/23/2010 Group Meeting 11/30/2010 Group Meeting 12/3/2010 Post CDR Action Item Generation 12/14/2010 Start working on the software 1/1/2011 -3/31/2011 Raise a budget of 16, 000 1/14/2011 Final Down Select—Flights Awarded 2011 Co. DR

1/20/2011 Purchase first and second spectrometers 1/22/2011 Construction of Rock Sat X plate 1/26/2011

1/20/2011 Purchase first and second spectrometers 1/22/2011 Construction of Rock Sat X plate 1/26/2011 Environmental test(First spectrometer attach to the plate) 1/28/2011 Post CDR Action Item Review 2/1/2011 -3/31/2011 Dual mass spectrometer after environmental and vacuum test 2/4/2011 First Installment Due 2/18/2011 Online Progress Report 3 Due 2/20/2011 Start working on the booms 2/23/2011 Individual Subsystem Testing Reports Due 2/25/2011 Individual Subsystem Testing Reports Teleconference 3/10/2011 Basic Integration 3/18/2011 Online Progress Report 4 Due 3/23/2011 Payload Subsystem Integration and Testing Report Due 3/25/2011 Payload Subsystem Integration and Testing Report Teleconference April 2011 Rock. Sat Payload Decks Sent To Customers (Pending Completion) 4/1/2011 Final Installment Due 4/15/2011 Online Progress Report 5 Due 4/18/2010 Partial Integration 4/20/2011 First DITL Test Report Due 4/22/2011 DITL 1 Teleconferences 2011 Co. DR

5/6/2011 Weekly Teleconference 1 5/9/2011 Full Integration 5/13/2011 Weekly Teleconference 2 5/18/2011 Second DITL

5/6/2011 Weekly Teleconference 1 5/9/2011 Full Integration 5/13/2011 Weekly Teleconference 2 5/18/2011 Second DITL Test Report Due 5/20/2011 Weekly Teleconference 3 (2 nd DITL Presentations) 5/27/2011 Weekly Teleconference 4 5/29/2011 Software test 5/30/2011 Redesign final review 6/3/2011 Weekly Teleconference 5 (Travel Logistics) 6/10/2011 Launch Readiness Review 1 (LRR) Due 6/13/2011 Launch Readiness Review 1 (LRR) at Wallops 6/14 -16/2011 Environmental Testing/Integration at Wallops 6/17/2011 Action Item Meeting with Wallops 7/8/2011 Post Environmental Tag-Up 1 7/29/2011 Post Environmental Tag-Up 2 7/30/2011 Final LRR Due 7/30/2011 Final Payload Inspections 7/30 -31/2011 Final LRR and Inspections 08/1 -2/2011 Final Payload Integration 8/4/2011 Launch! 8/5 -7/2011 Contingency Launch 2011 Co. DR

Testing Plan 2011 Co. DR 58

Testing Plan 2011 Co. DR 58

System Level Test • Verify with the environmental test that all components of the

System Level Test • Verify with the environmental test that all components of the payload are secure. Perform simulation test to ensure that all subsystem (electronic, mechanical and software) levels are working to perfection. Do mass spectroscopy tests on RGAs. This test the out gassing of each RGA. 2011 Co. DR 59

Mechanical Test • Our boom is still to be designed. The boom is the

Mechanical Test • Our boom is still to be designed. The boom is the extension part of the payload that consist mostly of mechanics. The boom contains the RGA, which need to be slightly modified in order to operate properly. • We have planned to make an environmental test. Which will help us to secure the payload. (vibration test) • We are still making arrangements to perform an additional environmental test on RGAs in January 2011 Co. DR 60

Electrical Test • We will simulate the experiment by using the standard voltage of

Electrical Test • We will simulate the experiment by using the standard voltage of the guideline. This test will be use to verify all electronic components. • Plate 3 - CPU and DC to DC converter • Plate 4 -(if necessary for additional battery power) 2011 Co. DR 61

Software Test • It will be tested by simulating the programming of the mission

Software Test • It will be tested by simulating the programming of the mission to ensure the synchronization and performance of all the components of the system (Electronics, RGA and boom) 2011 Co. DR 62

Budget Equipment, Materials, and Trips Cost Materials for Pilot: $5, 000 Computer protector Production

Budget Equipment, Materials, and Trips Cost Materials for Pilot: $5, 000 Computer protector Production canister Materials: $2, 500 Computers x-86 ocz ssd $88. 99 Via emitx motherboard $369. 00 Power supplies Teflon cables, connectors Capton tape, insulators Control Board RS-232 4 -Channel Solid State $124 RS-232 $-Channel 5 Amp $124 DC-DC Converter $60 GC Mass. Spec $22, 500 Residual Gas Analizer(3) $10, 350 Consumable Materials $7, 650 Electron Multiplier(3) $4, 500 Payload flight $24, 000 Trip to Wallops August 2011 $20, 600 Flight $5, 000 Hotel $8, 400 Car $2, 400 Food $4, 800 Trip to Wallps June 2011 $4, 790 Flight $1, 500 Hotel $1, 960 Car $500 Food $840 Team Polo's $600 Estimate Total $82, 820 2011 Co. DR 63

Team Members Students: § § § Faculty Support: Angelica Betancourt Joseph Casillas Luis Maldonado

Team Members Students: § § § Faculty Support: Angelica Betancourt Joseph Casillas Luis Maldonado Pedro Melendez Marisara Morales Joshua Nieves Oscar A. Resto Omar Rocafort Carlos Rodriguez Esteban Romero Marimer Soto Yashira Torres § § § 2011 Co. DR Vladimir Makarov Gerardo Morell Ricardo Morales Gladys Muñoz Guillermo Nery Oscar Resto 64

Conclusion • • • The aim in this experiment is to analyze the atomic/molecule

Conclusion • • • The aim in this experiment is to analyze the atomic/molecule species that could be found during the flight of the payload, ionizing and analyzing them by their atomic mass components and partial pressures. With this kind of analysis we intend to study the possibility of in-flight energy/materials resource collector for long term and deep space vehicles. Issues, concerns, any questions – 6 amps at 28 volts to confirm with actual equipment – Battery plate – Boom Design – Budget !!! Plan for where you will take your design from here? – Purchase the fierst Mass. Spectrometerd – Atmospheric, and vibration test on the Mass Spectrometer will be send to be tested by mail. 2011 Co. DR 65

References 1. Anonymous. Internet tutorial for GCMS. Retrived from: http: //www. scientific. org/tutorials/articles/gcms. html

References 1. Anonymous. Internet tutorial for GCMS. Retrived from: http: //www. scientific. org/tutorials/articles/gcms. html 2. Anonymous. Bioinstrumentation class (internet based) (1998). Retrieved from: http: //www. gmu. edu/depts/SRIF/tutorial/gcd/gc-ms 2. htm 3. Extorr Instrument manual (2006). PDF download retrieved from: http: //extorr. com/manual. htm 4. Meng, Alan and Hui. Retrived from: http: //www. vtaide. com/png/atmosphere. htm 5. Russel, Randy (2006). Retrieved from: http: //www. windows 2 universe. org/earth/Atmosphere/chemistry_troposphere. html 6. Tans, Pierter. Retrived from: http: //www. esrl. noaa. gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/#mlo 7. Uherek, Elmar (2004) “What is up in air in the troposphere? ”. Retrieved from: http: //www. atmosphere. mpg. de/enid/1__Extensi_n_y_composici_n/_componentes_2 vv. html 8. UNEP/GRIP (2003). Retrieved from: http: //www. grida. no/publications/other/ipcc%5 Ftar/? src=/climate/ipcc_tar/wg 1/221. htm 2011 • 9. 66 Co. DR Young, D. T. , B. L. Barraclough, J. -J. Berthelier. Plasma Experiment for

10. D. Offermann, K. Pelka and U. Von Zah, Mass spectrometric measurements of minor

10. D. Offermann, K. Pelka and U. Von Zah, Mass spectrometric measurements of minor constituents in the lower thermosphere, Retrieved from: http: //www. sciencedirect. com/science 11. Earth’s Atmosphere, Retrieved from: http: //www. nasa. gov/audience/forstudents/9 -12/features/912_liftoff_atm. html 12. W. Reusch, The Mass Spectrometer (1999). Retrieved from: http: //www 2. chemistry. msu. edu/faculty/reusch/Virt. Txt. Jml/Spectrpy/Mass. Spec/massp ec 1. htm 13. Thermosphere, Retrieved from: http: //www. windows 2 universe. org/earth_science/Atm_Science/Temp_structure/struct ure_thermo. html 14. P. Mitchell. 2004, The Venus-Halley Missions, Retrieved from: http: //www. mentallandscape. com/V_Vega. htm 15. Mission Overview: Stardust. Retrieved from: http: //stardust. jpl. nasa. gov/mission/index. html 16. Anonymous. Internet tutorial for GCMS. Retrived from: http: //www. scientific. org/tutorials/articles/gcms. html 2011 Co. DR 67

17. Anonymous. Bioinstrumentation class (internet based) (1998). Retrieved from: http: //www. gmu. edu/depts/SRIF/tutorial/gcd/gc-ms 2.

17. Anonymous. Bioinstrumentation class (internet based) (1998). Retrieved from: http: //www. gmu. edu/depts/SRIF/tutorial/gcd/gc-ms 2. htm 18. Extorr Instrument manual (2006). PDF download retrieved from: http: //extorr. com/manual. htm 19. Meng, Alan and Hui. Retrived from: http: //www. vtaide. com/png/atmosphere. htm 20. Russel, Randy (2006). Retrieved from: http: //www. windows 2 universe. org/earth/Atmosphere/chemistry_troposphere. ht ml 21. Tans, Pierter. Retrived from: http: //www. esrl. noaa. gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/#mlo 22. Uherek, Elmar (2004) “What is up in air in the troposphere? ”. Retrieved from: http: //www. atmosphere. mpg. de/enid/1__Extensi_n_y_composici_n/_componentes_2 vv. html 23. UNEP/GRIP (2003). Retrieved from: http: //www. grida. no/publications/other/ipcc%5 Ftar/? src=/climate/ipcc_tar/wg 1/2 21. htm 2011 Co. DR 68

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Mass spectrometers have been used at other planets and

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Mass spectrometers have been used at other planets and moons. Two were taken to Mars by the Viking program. In early 2005 the Cassini-Huygens mission delivered a specialized GC-MS instrument aboard the Huygens probe through the atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of the planet Saturn. This instrument analyzed atmospheric samples along its descent trajectory and was able to vaporize and analyze samples of Titan's frozen, hydrocarbon covered surface once the probe had landed. These measurements compared the abundance of isotope(s) of each particle comparatively to earth's natural abundance. [42] Also onboard the Cassini. Huygens spacecraft is an ion and neutral mass spectrometer which has been taking measurements of Titan's atmospheric composition as well as the composition of Enceladus' plumes. A Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer mass spectrometer was carried by the Mars Phoenix Lander launched in 2007. [43] 2011 Co. DR 69

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Rosetta is a European Space Agency-led robotic spacecraft mission

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Rosetta is a European Space Agency-led robotic spacecraft mission launched in 2004. Once attached to the comet, expected to take place in November 2014, the lander will begin its science mission: around characterization of the nucleus, determination of the chemical compounds present, including enantiomers and study of comet activities and developments over time. It includes instruments for gas and particle analysis, like for example ROSINA(Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) the instrument consists a double focus magnetic mass spectrometer DFMS and a reflectron type time of flight mass spectrometer RTOF. The DFMS has a high resolution for molecules up to 300 amu. The RTOF is a highly sensitive for neutral molecules and for ions. 2011 Co. DR 70

Mission Overview: Previous Research • For the in situ investigation of planetary atmospheres a

Mission Overview: Previous Research • For the in situ investigation of planetary atmospheres a small Mattauch‐Herzog mass spectrometer has been developed. Its high‐pressure performance has been improved by incorporating differential pumping between the ion source and the analyzing fields, shortening the path‐length as well as increasing the extraction field in the ion source. In addition doubly ionized and dissociated ions are used for mass analysis. These measures make possible operation up to 10− 2 millibars. Results of laboratory tests related to linearity, dynamic range, and mass resolution are presented, in particular for CO 2. 2011 Co. DR 71

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Mass spectrometric measurements of minor constituents in the lower

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Mass spectrometric measurements of minor constituents in the lower thermosphere D. Offermanna, K. Pelkaa and U. Von Zahna a Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn W. Germany Received 1 November 1971. Available online 15 November 2001. • Abstract The feasibility of measurements of CO 2, NO, N and H 2 O in the lower thermosphere by means of rocket-borne mass spectrometers with helium-cooled and with conventional ion sources is discussed. Three recent night-time experiments above Sardinia are described. They took place on October 13, 1970, at 0208 CET (payload SN 5, helium-cooled ion source) and on February 7, 1971, at 0022 CET and 0445 CET (payloads ESRO S 80 -2 and -3, respectively, uncooled ion sources). Preliminary results indicate CO 2 to be mixed up to the turbopause and to be in diffusive equilibrium higher up. The ratio NO: N 2 was found to be in fair agreement with recent model calculations of Strobel (1971) for the altitute range 140 to 200 km. 2011 Co. DR 72

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Proposed project of a cometary coma is composed of

Mission Overview: Previous Research • Proposed project of a cometary coma is composed of material outgassed and sputtered from the nucleus. Photoionization, charge exchange, and direct surface sputtering all generate a substantial ion population. A PEPE-class instrument can efficiently sample and analyze the ion population. Example targeted measurements are the cometary 13 C/12 C ratio (a possible test of solar vs. extrasolar system origins), the 18 O/16 O ratio (Halley is the only outer solar system object for which this is known), trace molecular abundances including the CO/N 2 ratio which a PEPEclass instrument is uniquely capable of measuring [2], and heavier organic molecules up to 135 amu. PEPE possesses a unique advantage over mass spectrometers flown on Giotto and those on known future comet missions: the carbon foil used to generate timing signals breaks up molecules, allowing isotopic ratios of volatile species such as H, C, N, O to be analyzed without interferences from hydride molecular ions (H 2, CH, NH, OH, H 2 O, etc. ) [2]. 2011 Co. DR 73

Mission Overview: Previous Research • IMS design is ideally suited for magnetospheric studies of

Mission Overview: Previous Research • IMS design is ideally suited for magnetospheric studies of the Neptune. Triton or Jovian environments (Focus 2) where it could build on the highmass-resolution studies of the Saturnian system planned with Cassini IMS [2]. Because our IMS/PEPE designs measure composition, they are also invaluable for the study of the ionospheres of outer planet moons, and indirectly, their atmospheric and surface chemistries (Focus 1). For the Neptune-Triton system, a PEPE-class instrument could give a first in-situ glimpse of the magnetosphere and help determine key processes in Triton's atmosphere, as well as yielding some key isotope ratios. Galileo's IMS mass resolution of only 2 amu did not allow Na to be distinguished from O, an important goal for the understanding of Io's ionospheric and exospheric processes. Key isotopic measurements, e. g. 34 S/32 S, at Io are also crucial to understanding that body's evolution. Similarly, a highmass- resolution instrument in low Europa orbit may give a better understanding not only of its tenuous atmosphere, but also of key isotopic and elementalsurface compositions in lieu of a lander. 2011 Co. DR 74

Mission Overview: Previous Research • The Stardust spacecraft brought back samples of interstellar dust,

Mission Overview: Previous Research • The Stardust spacecraft brought back samples of interstellar dust, including recently discovered dust streaming into our Solar System from the direction of Sagittarius. These materials are believed to consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and nebular that include remnants from the formation of the Solar System. Analysis of such fascinating celestial specks is expected to yield important insights into the evolution of the Sun its planets and possibly even the origin of life itself. During the Stardust project, the spacecraft traveled more than 3 billion miles over seven years, rendezvous-ing with the comet Wild 2 during the second of three orbits around the sun. The end of the mission marked the beginning of another adventure: Examining the comet particles with powerful scientific instruments called mass spectrometers, which are able to identify what isotopes the stuff is made of. Using mass spectrometry, the researchers found the amino acid on samples from the comet Wild 2, adding fuel to the argument that life on Earth may have had its start in outer space and that life may exist outside of Earth. 2011 Co. DR 75