Unit 3 Source Analysis Progressive Era American History

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Unit 3 Source Analysis Progressive Era American History II

Unit 3 Source Analysis Progressive Era American History II

C. P. S Strategy • For each slide, please complete a CPS strategy analysis

C. P. S Strategy • For each slide, please complete a CPS strategy analysis of the document. • C - Context: What does the source say/imply? • P - Point: What’s the point? • S - Significance: Why is the source important? ● Use Complete Sentences, restate the question ● Answer in RED ● For the Map Question, answer the questions provided, don’t use CPS

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -

https: //www. loc. gov/resource/g 4126 p. rr 005020/? r=0. 282, 0. 214, 0. 244,

https: //www. loc. gov/resource/g 4126 p. rr 005020/? r=0. 282, 0. 214, 0. 244, 0. 125, 0 to interact with and better see the map (and properly analyze), use the link above, zoom in and out on the map ● In the top right corner, you’ll see the maps legend. What year was this taken? What landmarks does this map highlight? What States are in this map? ● Follow the trails of the completed railroad. What is notable about most cities listed on the map? Do you recognize any of the cities? ● ● How many Indian Reservations do you see on the map? How many Military Reservations? How many Forest Reservations? Why would we want to preserve forest land? What well known park, that is still around today, do you see in Wyoming? Who was the President who established the US Forest Service?

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance - [T]he meat would be shoveled

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance - [T]he meat would be shoveled into carts, and the man who did the shoveling would not trouble to lift out a rat even when he saw one—there were things that went into the sausage in comparison with which a poisoned rat was a tidbit. There was no place for the men to wash their hands before they ate their dinner, and so they made a practice of washing them in the water that was to be ladled into the sausage. There were the butt-ends of smoked meat, and the scraps of corned beef, and all the odds and ends of the waste of the plants, that would be dumped into old barrels in the cellar and left there. Under the system of rigid economy which the packers enforced, there were some jobs that it only paid to do once in a long time, and among these was the cleaning out of the waste barrels. Every spring they did it; and in the barrels would be dirt and rust and old nails and stale water— and cartload after cartload of it would be taken up and dumped into the hoppers with fresh meat, and sent out to the public’s breakfast. - Upton Sinclair (The Jungle)

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -

● Context - ● Point - ● Significance -