U S History Unit 2 Industrialization Urbanization Bellwork

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U. S. History : Unit 2 Industrialization & Urbanization Bellwork: (just answer, don’t write

U. S. History : Unit 2 Industrialization & Urbanization Bellwork: (just answer, don’t write questions) § Did your family migrate to the U. S. or do you know someone’s who did? § Where from and where did they go once in the U. S. ? § If you could take everything you have right now in your possession and move to a new country would you move to an area with the same language culture and religion as yourself Learning Target: Today we will explain how the scarcity of resources for families (especially immigrants) necessitated personal choices (e. g. , child labor, tenement housing)

Today’s Goals: You will be able to define the following: immigration, emigration, ghetto, tenement,

Today’s Goals: You will be able to define the following: immigration, emigration, ghetto, tenement, nativism You will be able to articulate what types of problems immigrants faced and decisions they made as a result To begin, complete the “What I Think” column for the 5 vocab words

Lesson Vocabulary Immigration- The action of coming to live permanently in a foreign country

Lesson Vocabulary Immigration- The action of coming to live permanently in a foreign country Emigration- Exiting your homeland, you may return Nativism- the policy of protecting the interests of nativeborn or established inhabitants against those of immigrants Ghetto- a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups Tenement- a room or a set of rooms forming a separate residence within a house or block of apartments

Where Did Immigrants Come From Immigrants settling on the East Coast Midwest were mostly

Where Did Immigrants Come From Immigrants settling on the East Coast Midwest were mostly Europeans Immigrants settling on the West Coast Midwest were mostly from China and other Asian Countries WHY? Do you think they all came from one country or region in Europe or all over at the same time?

Where the Majority of Immigrants Came From Does it seem like the movement transitions

Where the Majority of Immigrants Came From Does it seem like the movement transitions from one section of Europe to the next?

Where Would You Live? Immigrants often moved to big cities on the East Coast

Where Would You Live? Immigrants often moved to big cities on the East Coast so they could get a job in the factory (Immigrants enabled the industrial revolution) Some immigrants chose to move out west (homestead act offered free land as long as you could make it better and you had the means to get out there) Not many immigrants migrated to the south…. . Why not?

Ellis Island Angel Island “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled Masses yearning

Ellis Island Angel Island “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled Masses yearning to breathe free, your wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempesttost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” Emma Lazarus, 1883 Ellis Island is a small piece of land that the government designated to be a reception center for immigrants arriving into the US. It became known as “The Golden Door” Angel Island was the reception center for immigrants arriving to the West Coast By the end of the 1800’s nearly 80% of New Yorkers were foreign born

Living Conditions/ Tenements Why do you think immigrants had horrible housing in cities of

Living Conditions/ Tenements Why do you think immigrants had horrible housing in cities of America? Shortage of adequate housing with the rise of immigration Immigrants could not often afford nice housing when they first arrived to the United States, and because of human nature there were people figuring out how to make money off of this https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=p 4 py. X 4 Rw. Op 4

Working Conditions Working in factories long hours 6 or 7 days a week Children

Working Conditions Working in factories long hours 6 or 7 days a week Children working Working in Sweatshops Why did immigrants have low wage jobs? Minorities were often not allowed to have good jobs due to skills, language barriers or beliefs that “Americans” should have those jobs

Problems Immigrants Faced Nativism = extreme dislike of immigrants by native -born people Agencies,

Problems Immigrants Faced Nativism = extreme dislike of immigrants by native -born people Agencies, work groups and some politicians had a strong sense of Nativism therefore making life more difficult for immigrants Many Immigrants ended up living in Ghettos. This was convenient in some ways because everyone spoke the same language, had same culture and issues It was bad because of condition of Ghettos

Exit Slip Describe some conditions immigrants experienced in America and how they lived as

Exit Slip Describe some conditions immigrants experienced in America and how they lived as a result

U. S. History : Unit 2 Industrialization & Urbanization Bellwork: § What are immigration

U. S. History : Unit 2 Industrialization & Urbanization Bellwork: § What are immigration policies like today in America? § Why do you think we have these policies? Learning Target: Today we will analyze how the U. S. government’s immigration policies of certain groups of people affected their ability to immigrate to the United States. (e. g. , Asians, Southern Europeans, religious groups)

Immigration Waves in US History 1840 -1860— • Old Immigrants- largely northern European, especially

Immigration Waves in US History 1840 -1860— • Old Immigrants- largely northern European, especially England, Ireland Germany— approx. 4. 5 million Late 1890 -1920— • New Immigrants- largely Southern and Eastern European, including Polish and Russian Jews, Italian, Greek—approx. 14. 5 million

Push and Pull Factors Push Factors: Conditions that drive people to leave their homes

Push and Pull Factors Push Factors: Conditions that drive people to leave their homes Pull Factors: Conditions that attract people to a new area Examples: • Land scarce in home country • Political and/or religious persecution • Revolutions • Poverty Examples: • Promise of freedom (religious and political) • Hope for a new life • Industry • Jobs • Land

Chinese Exclusion Act STEP 1: Read the timeline carefully. Write your HYPOTHESES for why

Chinese Exclusion Act STEP 1: Read the timeline carefully. Write your HYPOTHESES for why the Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. STEP 2: Read document A-D. For each, write any evidence you find for what led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Lastly, we’ll come back and answer the guiding question

Prejudice against immigrants Focus: How the U. S. government’s immigration policies of certain groups

Prejudice against immigrants Focus: How the U. S. government’s immigration policies of certain groups of people affected their ability to immigrate to the United States. Use the book from pages 446 -47 to answer the questions on the back of your handout After, we will analyze political cartoons demonstrating the government’s shift in immigration policies

Welcome to All J. Keppler. 1880 “We may safely say that the present influx

Welcome to All J. Keppler. 1880 “We may safely say that the present influx of immigration to the United States is something unprecedented in our generation. ” – N. Y. Statistical Review

Analyzing Political Cartoons 1. J. Keppler drew the first cartoon in 1880 and the

Analyzing Political Cartoons 1. J. Keppler drew the first cartoon in 1880 and the second in 1893. Describe the two cartoons. 2. What are the differences in the point of view between them? 3. Why do you think attitudes on immigration changed? How do government policies effect attitudes? 4. In what ways are the attitudes toward immigrants/immigration today similar and different to attitudes of the Gilded Age?

Looking Backward J. Keppler, Puck magazine, 1893 “They would close to the new-comer the

Looking Backward J. Keppler, Puck magazine, 1893 “They would close to the new-comer the bridge that carried their fathers over. ”

Exit Slip: How did the government’s policies affect different people’s ability to immigrate to

Exit Slip: How did the government’s policies affect different people’s ability to immigrate to the U. S during the Gilded Age?