Turning Visions into Goals Where is the international

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Turning Visions into Goals Where is the international process headed? Notes for the presentation

Turning Visions into Goals Where is the international process headed? Notes for the presentation of Roberto Bissio, Head of the International Secretariat of Social Watch Public event: Thursday, 12 September 2013 Medelhavsmuséet, Fredsgatan 2, Stockholm

“A life of dignity for all” The report of secretary-general Ban Ki-moon to the

“A life of dignity for all” The report of secretary-general Ban Ki-moon to the UN General Assembly, titled “A life of dignity for all” includes some interesting new approaches: $1 a day is out and now poverty is “multidimensional” Human Rights are at the centre Monitoring and accountability are stenghtened

14 “actions”: 14 future goals? Eradicate poverty in all its forms. Tackle exclusion and

14 “actions”: 14 future goals? Eradicate poverty in all its forms. Tackle exclusion and inequality. Empower women and girls. Provide quality education and lifelong learning. Improve health. Address climate change, in keeping with the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities. Address environmental challenges. Promote inclusive and sustainable growth and decent employment. End hunger and malnutrition. Address demographic challenges (high fertility in some countries and aging population in others). Enhance the positive contributions of migrants, which are more than one billion people. Meet the challenges of urbanization, since 70% of the world population will live in cities by 2050. Build peace and effective governance. Foster a renewed global partnership, based on the values of equity, solidarity and human rights.

More of the same? The growth of “emerging economies” seems to be stopping and

More of the same? The growth of “emerging economies” seems to be stopping and what some saw as “new locomotives” now look more like another financial bubbles about to burst. . . Yet, the SG report only mentions the global economic and financial crisis as a cause of diminishing ODA.

What multilateral finances want In a joint letter to Ban Ki-moon, the heads of

What multilateral finances want In a joint letter to Ban Ki-moon, the heads of six multilateral development banks and the IMF proposed last July “maximizing the impact of ODA” supporting “new development partnerships” to “leverage the private sector”. Ban's report ambiguously states that “official development assistance will remain crucial, including for leveraging other finance”.

An old (failed) strategy To “leverage” public money (ODA) in order to cover the

An old (failed) strategy To “leverage” public money (ODA) in order to cover the risks of private investment can certainly promote investment, but it can also be morally hazardous, as eventual profits will be privatized, but losses would be socialized.

Problems with “leveraging” * Private finance follows market trends leading to a concentration of

Problems with “leveraging” * Private finance follows market trends leading to a concentration of resources, including focussing financing operations in middle-income countries, and in already favoured sectors, such as extractives and finance. There is a high risk that financial returns will outweigh development objectives. * Often “leveraged” investments merely replace other sources of private finance. The British Overseas Development Institute (ODI) noted that “leverage ratios do not have a one-to-one relationship with additionality. ” * There is a high opportunity cost of investing scarce public money in this kind of instrument, particularly at a time when there is an urgent need for more public finance for investment in basic services. * There is insufficient attention to transparency and accountability. * There is potential debt risk for developing countries. * It might amount to a subsidy to donor-country corporations and banks.

What is missing from the MDGs?

What is missing from the MDGs?

What is missing from the MDGs?

What is missing from the MDGs?

What is missing from the MDGs? Monitoring and Accountability

What is missing from the MDGs? Monitoring and Accountability

What is missing from the MDGs? Monitoring and Accountability Developed countries are monitored, but

What is missing from the MDGs? Monitoring and Accountability Developed countries are monitored, but not held accountable (Goal 8 has no time schedules) The key goals of developing countries are not monitorable.

Are MDGs really monitorable? Evolution of “absolute poverty line” can only be assessed for

Are MDGs really monitorable? Evolution of “absolute poverty line” can only be assessed for less than half of developing countries, while little over one third have at least two data points to assess evolution of national poverty lines.

Who will monitor?

Who will monitor?

Who will monitor? From the “dignity” report: 105. Strong monitoring and accountability will be

Who will monitor? From the “dignity” report: 105. Strong monitoring and accountability will be crucial for the implementation of the post-2015 development agenda. Governments, especially parliaments, will play a central role. The monitoring and accountability framework can be strengthened through the direct engagement of citizens and responsible businesses making use of new technologies to expand coverage, to disaggregate data and to reduce costs. Big corporations should be monitored, not the other way around!

What makes monitoring possible? Freedom of expression Access to information Plurality of voices Independence

What makes monitoring possible? Freedom of expression Access to information Plurality of voices Independence of judges and scorekeepers

Next steps Sustainable Development Goals by September 2014 New development agenda to be decided

Next steps Sustainable Development Goals by September 2014 New development agenda to be decided in a Summit in September 2015 New climate change treaty in 2015 Reform of the multilateral financial institutions in ? ?