Tornado Explosion Flood READY OR NOT HERE I

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Tornado Explosion Flood READY OR NOT, HERE I COME! MR. TOMMY BOWERMEISTER Fire ASSISTANT

Tornado Explosion Flood READY OR NOT, HERE I COME! MR. TOMMY BOWERMEISTER Fire ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, ERAU ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, FSU / FCPR R E T I R E D U S A F O F F I C E R Crash TABALLEN [email protected] COM

AGENDA • • Hook Book Look Took In any moment of decision the best

AGENDA • • Hook Book Look Took In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. " --Theodore Roosevelt, 26 th president of the U. S

HOOK • Can you name the worst school tragedy in the US? • A.

HOOK • Can you name the worst school tragedy in the US? • A. Columbine • 18 people killed • B. Sandy Hook • 26 people killed • C. Virginia Tech • 32 people killed • D. Bath, Michigan • 45 people killed • E. Our Lady of the Angels • 95 people killed

HOOK (CONT) Natural disasters • Hurricanes • Earthquakes • Fires • Tornadoes • Floods

HOOK (CONT) Natural disasters • Hurricanes • Earthquakes • Fires • Tornadoes • Floods • Lightning • Sink Holes Manmade disasters • Shooter / Bomber (s) • Kidnapper • Fires • Chemical Spills / Explosions • Airplane crash • Bus crash • Sports events • Disease

BOOK • FEMA / EMI Online Classes • NIMS Course: IS - 700 •

BOOK • FEMA / EMI Online Classes • NIMS Course: IS - 700 • ICS Courses: IS – 100, 100. SC and 200 located at http: //training. fema. gov/IS/NIMS. aspx • • Local Ordinances School Board Policies and Procedures Best Practice Crisis Emergency Plans Edward’s SHEL Model

BOOK (CONT) NIMS Course: IS – 700 A This course introduces and overviews the

BOOK (CONT) NIMS Course: IS – 700 A This course introduces and overviews the National Incident Management System (NIMS). NIMS provides a consistent nationwide template to enable all government, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together during domestic incidents. Course Objectives: At the end of this course, students will be able to: • Describe the intent of NIMS. • Describe the key concepts and principles underlying NIMS. • Describe the purpose of the NIMS Components including: Preparedness, Communications and Information Management, Resource Management, and Command Management. • Describe the purpose of the National Integration Center. Note: This course provides a basic introduction to NIMS. It is not designed to replace Incident Command System and position-specific training. Primary Audience • Individuals with emergency management responsibilities including prevention, preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation.

BOOK (CONT. ) Incident Command System (ISC) Courses IS – 100 b: Introduction to

BOOK (CONT. ) Incident Command System (ISC) Courses IS – 100 b: Introduction to the Incident Command System ü This course introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. ü This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. ü It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Primary Audience • Persons involved with emergency planning, response or recovery efforts.

BOOK (CONT) IS-100. Sca: ICS for Schools The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) developed the

BOOK (CONT) IS-100. Sca: ICS for Schools The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) developed the Introduction to Incident Command System for Schools course in collaboration with the U. S. Department of Education. The course is designed primarily for kindergarten through high school personnel. Course Goal is to promote school safety by: • Familiarizing you with how ICS principles can be applied in school-based incidents. • Preparing you to interface with community response personnel Course Objectives: • At the completion of this course, you should be familiar with: • ICS applications in school-based incidents. • ICS organizational principles and elements. • ICS positions and responsibilities. • ICS facilities and functions. • ICS planning. • In addition, you will learn the steps you should take to be accountable for your actions during an incident.

BOOK (CONT. ) IS – 200. B: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action

BOOK (CONT. ) IS – 200. B: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents Course Overview ICS 200 is designed to enable personnel to operate efficiently during an incident or event within the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS-200 provides training on and resources for personnel who are likely to assume a supervisory position within the ICS. Primary Audience • Persons involved with emergency planning, response or recovery efforts.

BOOK (CONT. ) • Local Law Enforcement Policies • School Board Policies and Procedures

BOOK (CONT. ) • Local Law Enforcement Policies • School Board Policies and Procedures • Best Practice Crisis Emergency Plans

BOOK (CONT. ) • Edward’s SHEL Model • Software (Programs and Procedures) • Hardware

BOOK (CONT. ) • Edward’s SHEL Model • Software (Programs and Procedures) • Hardware (Equipment) • Environment (Weather and everything else) • Liveware (People and all personal interactions)

BOOK (CONT. )

BOOK (CONT. )

LOOK • Let’s divide up into groups and discuss what policies and procedures your

LOOK • Let’s divide up into groups and discuss what policies and procedures your county/school district has for planning, preventing, practicing, and responding to a specific type of disaster. “The most successful people are those who are good at Plan B. " -- James Yorke, mathematics and physics professor

DEBRIEF BY TABLE • Use the SHEL Model to debrief your table discussion. •

DEBRIEF BY TABLE • Use the SHEL Model to debrief your table discussion. • S = What are the major procedures • H = What equipment is critical and what equipment can be borrowed • E = What changes with rain, cold, hot, wind • L = What are the liveware-liveware interfaces and who are the critical players

LOOK • Disaster / Crisis areas at the tables: • • • Table 1:

LOOK • Disaster / Crisis areas at the tables: • • • Table 1: Guns and bombs Table 2: Explosions and Fires Table 3: Crashes (Airplanes, buses, trains, cars) Table 4: Chemical Spills (Plants, trucks, & trains) Table 5: Sports events (basketball and football) Table 6: Bad weather (Tornado, lightning, winds) Use the SHEL Model as the discussion starter

LOOK • Disaster / Crisis areas at the tables: • • • Table 7:

LOOK • Disaster / Crisis areas at the tables: • • • Table 7: Flooding / Sink Holes Table 8: Trespasser / Kidnapper Table 9: Death - Suicide Table 10: Recall of critical people / relocations Table 11: Dealing with the Media / parents Table 12: Post-Event Return to “normal” Use the SHEL Model as the discussion starter

DEBRIEF BY TABLE Use the SHEL Model to debrief your table discussion: • S

DEBRIEF BY TABLE Use the SHEL Model to debrief your table discussion: • S = What are the major procedures • H = What equipment is critical and what equipment can be borrowed • E = What changes with rain, cold, hot, wind • L = What are the liveware-liveware interfaces and who are the critical players “The most successful people are those who are good at Plan B. " -- James Yorke, mathematics and physics professor

TOOK • What can we take away as action items for being better prepared

TOOK • What can we take away as action items for being better prepared to respond to a school disaster/emergency? • Action items will be provided to all attendees Are there any closing remarks or questions? In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. " --Theodore Roosevelt, 26 th president of the U. S