The Teaching Citation Program Creating a Teaching Portfolio

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The Teaching Citation Program & Creating a Teaching Portfolio Beth Fisher, Ph. D. Assistant

The Teaching Citation Program & Creating a Teaching Portfolio Beth Fisher, Ph. D. Assistant Director The Teaching Center Washington University Eads Hall 105 Phone: 314 -935 -6810 http: //teachingcenter. wustl. edu February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

The Teaching Citation n Completing ¡ Gain the Citation can help you teaching experience

The Teaching Citation n Completing ¡ Gain the Citation can help you teaching experience ¡ Present your teaching expertise on the academic job market ¡ Learn and develop relevant and effective teaching strategies ¡ Compile February 28, 2008 a teaching portfolio The Teaching Center, Washington University

Requirements 1. Fulfill departmental teaching requirements 2. Fulfill Graduate School of Arts & Sciences

Requirements 1. Fulfill departmental teaching requirements 2. Fulfill Graduate School of Arts & Sciences teaching requirements 3. Attend 5 teaching workshops 4. Complete 3 teaching experiences 5. Write a teaching philosophy statement February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Five Teaching Workshops n Three of the five required must be delivered by The

Five Teaching Workshops n Three of the five required must be delivered by The Teaching Center ¡ One of these three must be for an interdisciplinary audience (e. g. , GSS co-sponsored workshops) n Workshops should cover a breadth of topics n Recommended: complete the workshop requirement over several years February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Five Teaching Workshops n Workshops are approved by the Asst. Director of The Teaching

Five Teaching Workshops n Workshops are approved by the Asst. Director of The Teaching Center ¡ Exception: non-WU workshops may qualify, with prior approval of the Director of Graduate Studies February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Three Teaching Experiences n Must involve teaching groups of students ¡ n More than

Three Teaching Experiences n Must involve teaching groups of students ¡ n More than grading, office hours Generally a semester-long commitment (TAship or instructorship) n Must show proficiency in at least two different teaching methods n Approved by Director of Graduate Studies or Asst. Director of The Teaching Center February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Three Teaching Experiences n Each teaching experience must be observed and evaluated in writing

Three Teaching Experiences n Each teaching experience must be observed and evaluated in writing by a faculty member or the Asst. Director of the Teaching Center n Student evaluations commenting on your effectiveness should also be submitted n Click here for links to a Basic Checklist for the Evaluation of Teaching and a Sample Student Evaluation February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

The Teaching Philosophy Statement n n A 1 -2 page statement answering ¡ What

The Teaching Philosophy Statement n n A 1 -2 page statement answering ¡ What do you teach? ¡ How do you teach? ¡ Why do you teach? ¡ How do you measure your teaching effectiveness? Approved by Director of Graduate Study and the Asst. Director of Teaching Center February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Questions? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Questions? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Creating a Teaching Portfolio n Definition and Purpose n Know Your Audience n Major

Creating a Teaching Portfolio n Definition and Purpose n Know Your Audience n Major Components ¡ Teaching Philosophy Statement ¡ Examples and Evidence n Organizational and Presentational Tips n Using Feedback to Improve February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

What is a Teaching Portfolio? n A collection of documents that provide a record

What is a Teaching Portfolio? n A collection of documents that provide a record of ¡ The ideas and objectives that inform your teaching ¡ The courses you teach or are prepared to teach ¡ The methods you use ¡ Your effectiveness as a teacher ¡ How you assess and improve your teaching n A work-in-progress n Both forward- and backward-looking n SELECTIVE, rather than comprehensive February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Why Create a Teaching Portfolio? n To develop, clarify, and reflect on your teaching

Why Create a Teaching Portfolio? n To develop, clarify, and reflect on your teaching philosophy, methods, and approaches n To present teaching expertise and experience for hiring and promotion n To document professional development in teaching n To identify areas for improvement n To help you prepare for the interview process February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Timing n BEGIN compiling a teaching portfolio during your first year of graduate school

Timing n BEGIN compiling a teaching portfolio during your first year of graduate school n UPDATE it for the academic job market February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Know Your Audience n What are the most important teaching issues and challenges in

Know Your Audience n What are the most important teaching issues and challenges in your field? ¡ Discuss ¡ Read with faculty advisors and peers articles on teaching ¡ Attend seminars and panel-discussions at conferences February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Know Your Audience n What do the job description and the institutions’ Web site

Know Your Audience n What do the job description and the institutions’ Web site suggest about teaching at that institution? n Why does a search committee ask for a teaching philosophy statement or teaching portfolio? What do they want to know? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Teaching Philosophy Statement n A brief, concise, and specific description of the ideas, objectives,

Teaching Philosophy Statement n A brief, concise, and specific description of the ideas, objectives, and approaches that inform your teaching n A tool to help you develop a sense of your teaching approach and style n NOT a rehashing of your CV or a narrative account of the history of your teaching experience n NOT an article on pedagogy February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Questions to Answer 1. Why do you teach? 2. What do you teach? 3.

Questions to Answer 1. Why do you teach? 2. What do you teach? 3. § Topics § Goals for student learning How do you teach? § 4. Methods and strategies How do you measure your teaching effectiveness? How do you know if you are meeting your goals? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Style Guidelines n Limit statement to 1 -2 pages, single-spaced n Use specific language

Style Guidelines n Limit statement to 1 -2 pages, single-spaced n Use specific language and examples ¡ Avoid clichés such as “student-centered teaching” n Use the first-person n Use the present tense whenever possible ¡ Exceptions: when discussing courses taught or courses planned n Avoid technical jargon February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

“Pre-Writing” Strategies n Write a letter to a friend or relative on the joys

“Pre-Writing” Strategies n Write a letter to a friend or relative on the joys and challenges of teaching n Make a list of the qualities of an effective teacher n “Free-write” on a memorable experience in the classroom n Develop your “dream course” ¡ What would be your topic? ¡ What would you want your students to learn? ¡ How would your research interests inform your approach? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

“Pre-Writing” Strategies n Begin with concrete details ¡ What sets you apart as a

“Pre-Writing” Strategies n Begin with concrete details ¡ What sets you apart as a teacher? ¡ How would an observer describe your teaching? ¡ What are the specific skills and knowledge that students should gain in the classroom? ¡ What should happen in the classroom? Why? ¡ What are the teaching methods that you see as most effective? Why? ¡ How would your research interests influence your approach to teaching an introductory course? February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Portfolio: Examples and Evidence n Sample Syllabi ¡ Courses Taught (note if TA or

Portfolio: Examples and Evidence n Sample Syllabi ¡ Courses Taught (note if TA or course instructor) ¡ Courses Planned (tailor for specific applications) n Sample Assignments and Assessments ¡ Essay questions, exams, research assignments ¡ Comments February 28, 2008 on student work The Teaching Center, Washington University

Examples and Evidence n n Evidence of Teaching Effectiveness ¡ Evaluations by faculty members

Examples and Evidence n n Evidence of Teaching Effectiveness ¡ Evaluations by faculty members or other observers ¡ Evaluations by students ¡ Teaching awards ¡ Videotape of a class Evidence of Professional Development ¡ Teaching Workshops, Seminars, Publications on Teaching February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Organizational Tools n Title page n Table of contents n Introduction or summary of

Organizational Tools n Title page n Table of contents n Introduction or summary of contents n Tab-separated sections n Brief summary of content in each section ¡ Most important: a summary that reflects on evaluations and how you have used them to improve your effectiveness February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Presentational Tips n Edit all documents to correct mechanical errors and improve clarity n

Presentational Tips n Edit all documents to correct mechanical errors and improve clarity n Copy documents on high-quality paper n Create a cover n Bind at copy shop n Consider adding a copyright symbol n Make additional copies if invited for an on-campus interview n On CV: “Teaching Portfolio available upon request” February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Using Feedback to Improve n Show the philosophy statement and portfolio to faculty members

Using Feedback to Improve n Show the philosophy statement and portfolio to faculty members and peers whose opinion you trust ¡ Ask for honest feedback: how would a search committee view this portfolio? n Address areas that you can improve now, as well as those you want to address in the future February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Key Concepts 1. Know your audience 2. Take the time to write and revise

Key Concepts 1. Know your audience 2. Take the time to write and revise an effective teaching philosophy statement 3. Be selective: provide examples and evidence to illustrate goals and methods summarized in statement 4. Ask for and use feedback to improve February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

Teaching Philosophy Statements For a selection of graduate students’ Teaching Philosophy Statements, see http:

Teaching Philosophy Statements For a selection of graduate students’ Teaching Philosophy Statements, see http: //www. ctl. uga. edu/teach_asst/ta_mentors/philosophy/index. html#06 February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University

For Additional Ideas and Assistance Visit The Teaching Center Web site: http: //teachingcenter. wustl.

For Additional Ideas and Assistance Visit The Teaching Center Web site: http: //teachingcenter. wustl. edu Schedule a teaching consultation: Beth Fisher, Ph. D. Assistant Director Eads Hall, Rm. 113 [email protected] edu 314 -935 -5921 February 28, 2008 The Teaching Center, Washington University