The StudentAthlete and College Admissions Phil Freed Director

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The Student-Athlete and College Admissions Phil Freed, Director of Athletics Jo Ann Momono, Director

The Student-Athlete and College Admissions Phil Freed, Director of Athletics Jo Ann Momono, Director of Athletics Amber Wilson, Counselor

How should one select a college? • Base selection on ALL factors (i. e.

How should one select a college? • Base selection on ALL factors (i. e. academics, social, size, location, services), not just on athletics. • Understand the student-athlete’s chances of making the team. (i. e. Would I still attend the institution if I could not play? ) • Junior Colleges: • Advantages: cost, ability to make the team • Disadvantages: some 4 year colleges don’t like to recruit from JCs • NCAA rules regarding Junior Colleges: if not an initial qualifier, must get AA

General Questions about Intercollegiate Athletics • What does Division I, II and III mean?

General Questions about Intercollegiate Athletics • What does Division I, II and III mean? • What are the major differences between divisions? • What does “recruiting” mean?

What is the “Walkon” process? • What is a “walk-on”? • What are the

What is the “Walkon” process? • What is a “walk-on”? • What are the chances of making the team as a “walk on”? • What is the process to “walk-on”? • Talk with your HS coach about a good “fit” and advocating for you. • Contact the colleges about their program: appointment to meet the coach, tryout procedure, etc.

Should I hire a recruiting service for my child? • Understand the motive of

Should I hire a recruiting service for my child? • Understand the motive of any recruiting service. • Do colleges really look at recruiting service information? • CBound – a free online informational guide for CCS schools: www. CBound. com

COLLEGE RECRUITING PROCESS • How does the process work? • When does it start?

COLLEGE RECRUITING PROCESS • How does the process work? • When does it start? • Questionaires- Coaches and players • Communication with Colleges- Verbal, written, questionaires

Plenty of parents dream of their children cashing in on a sports scholarship, but

Plenty of parents dream of their children cashing in on a sports scholarship, but before you get your hopes up you need to understand the hard realities of winning these awards. Here are eight things that parents and student athletes need to know about these scholarships. 1. The odds of winning a NCAA sports scholarship are miniscule. Only about 2 percent of high school athletes win sports scholarships every year at NCAA colleges and universities. Yes, the odds are that dismal. For those who do snag one, the average scholarship is less than $11, 000. 2. Full-ride sports scholarships are scarce. There are only six sports where all the scholarships are full ride. These so-called head-count sports are football, men and women's basketball, and women's gymnastics, volleyball, and tennis. In these Division I sports, athletes receive a full ride or no ride. 3. Scholarships can be dinky. Beyond the head-count sports, all other sports are considered "equivalency" sports. NCAA rules dictate how much money a program, such as lacrosse or track, can spend on scholarships. Coaches can slice and dice these awards as they choose, which can lead to awfully small scholarships. 4.

. 4. Take flattery with a grain of salt. Coaches may tell teenagers that

. 4. Take flattery with a grain of salt. Coaches may tell teenagers that they have lots of scholarship money to divvy out, but prospects shouldn't assume that they will be the recipients, says Karen Weaver, who is on the sports management faculty at Drexel University. A coach might not know whether he wants a particular athlete until he finds out what other teenagers want to sign on to his team. What really matters is the scholarship amount contained in the school's official athletic grantin-aid form. "Until you get the grant-in-aid form, it's meaningless, " observes Weaver, who is a former national championship Division I field hockey coach. 5. A verbal commitment is meaningless. Weaver has heard of coaches telling athletes as young as seventh-graders that they want them for their team. There is no guarantee that a child who verbally commits to a team will end up on it. A coach can change his mind about a prospect. 6. Playing high-level college sports will be a full-time job. Division I athletes may as well be called full-time employees of their schools because of the long hours they work. According to a NCAA survey last year, playing football required 43. 3 hours per week; college baseball, 42. 1 hours; men's basketball, 39. 2 hours; and women's basketball, 37. 6 hours. Because of the huge time commitment, as well as time away from campus, Division I athletes will often not be able to major in rigorous disciplines, such as the sciences and engineering.

7. Skip hiring an athletic recruiter. Coaches typically think sports recruiters are pests, says

7. Skip hiring an athletic recruiter. Coaches typically think sports recruiters are pests, says Weaver, who has served as a CBS sports commentator. Coaches don't want recruiters to get in the middle; they prefer direct dealings with the student athletes. 8. Forget about slick videos. Coaches don't want athletes to send lengthy videos. Two or three minutes will usually suffice, Weaver says. And you absolutely don't need to hire a professional to do the filming. Post your action video on You. Tube and send coaches the link.

NCAA Clearinghouse 1. Academic Eligibility 2. Completing NCAA Registration

NCAA Clearinghouse 1. Academic Eligibility 2. Completing NCAA Registration

Academic Eligibility – D 1 • 16 Core Courses. • A student-athlete with a

Academic Eligibility – D 1 • 16 Core Courses. • A student-athlete with a high g. p. a. can be eligible with a low SAT or ACT score whereas a student-athlete with a low g. p. a. needs a high SAT or ACT score to be eligible.

16 Core Courses Used to Determine Eligibility for DI SHCP • • DI •

16 Core Courses Used to Determine Eligibility for DI SHCP • • DI • 4 yrs. English 3 yrs. Mathematics 2 yrs. Science 3 yrs. Social Studies 2 yrs. Foreign Language 1 yr. V & P Arts 4 yrs. Religion • • • 4 yrs. English 3 yrs. Mathematics 2 yrs. Science 2 yrs. Social Science 1 yr. Additional math, science, or English 4 yrs. Additional core courses from any area above or foreign language.

16 Core Courses Used to Determine DII Eligibility SHCP DII • • 4 yrs.

16 Core Courses Used to Determine DII Eligibility SHCP DII • • 4 yrs. English 3 yrs. Mathematics 2 yrs. Science 3 yrs. Social Studies 2 yrs. Foreign Language 1 yr. V & P Arts 4 yrs. Religion • • • 3 yrs. English 2 yrs. Mathematics 2 yrs. Science 3 yrs. Additional math, science, or English 2 yrs. Social Science 4 yrs. Additional core courses from any area above or foreign language.

Division I Academic Eligibility Core GPA/Test Score Index • Core GPA ACT SAT-CR&M –

Division I Academic Eligibility Core GPA/Test Score Index • Core GPA ACT SAT-CR&M – 3. 550 400 37 – 3. 300 500 44 – 3. 000 620 52 – 2. 800 700 57 – 2. 675 750 61 – 2. 400 860 71 – 2. 300 900 75 ------ACADEMIC REDSHIRT -------------– 2. 299 910 76 – 2. 000 1020 86 *ACT score is a sum of the four sections: Math, English,

Division I College-bound student-athletes first entering an NCAA Division I college or university on

Division I College-bound student-athletes first entering an NCAA Division I college or university on or after August 1, 2016, will need to meet new academic rules (2. 3) in order to receive athletics aid (scholarship), practice or compete during their first year. • Complete 16 Core Courses: • Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school. • Seven of the 10 core courses must be in English, Math, or Science. • Minimum Core-Course GPA of 2. 300 for those entering D 1 on or after August 1, 2016. • Meet the sliding scale requirement of GPA and

Division II Academic Eligibility • Graduate from high school. • Minimum 2. 00 GPA

Division II Academic Eligibility • Graduate from high school. • Minimum 2. 00 GPA in 16 Core courses. • (If competing on or after August 1, 2018 a 2. 20 GPA will be required) • Minimum SAT score of 820 or ACT of 68. • Note: In calculating the GPA for both DI and DII, the better grade is used in repeated courses. Also, a “D” fulfills the course requirements, not an “F”.

DI and DII • Graduate from High School. • Complete a minimum of 16

DI and DII • Graduate from High School. • Complete a minimum of 16 core courses. • Present required GPA. After 2016 = 2. 30 • Present a qualifying test score from either the ACT or SAT. • Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request • Graduate from High School. • Complete a minimum of 16 core courses. • Present minimum 2. 00 GPA. • Present a minimum 820 SAT (CR + M) 68 ACT sum. • Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request

Completing NCAA Registration • On-line: www. eligibilitycenter. org - Payment $70 MC or Visa

Completing NCAA Registration • On-line: www. eligibilitycenter. org - Payment $70 MC or Visa - Request the registrar (Sue Elvander or Carol Collins) to send a six (6 th) semester transcript to the NCAA Clearinghouse in order to receive partial clearing.

Completing NCAA Registration • Registrar must send 6 th or 7 th semester transcript

Completing NCAA Registration • Registrar must send 6 th or 7 th semester transcript and then after graduation a final transcript. – Complete registration form after junior year. • Request SAT or ACT from each website www. collegeboard. com or www. actstudent. org to send test scores –

What Goes on in Iowa City • Partial Clearance for Collegiate Contact in order

What Goes on in Iowa City • Partial Clearance for Collegiate Contact in order to begin recruitment process after completing six semesters of high school course work. • Determine NCAA eligibility from transcript and test scores. • Review eligibility and grant full clearance for collegiate athletics after final transcript (graduation with 8 semesters completed)

Q and A Time • Thanks for coming. • Reminder: Senior Parents Financial Aid

Q and A Time • Thanks for coming. • Reminder: Senior Parents Financial Aid Meeting: Wednesday December 9, 2015 at 6: 30 pm - 7: 30 pm Thursday December 10, 2015 at 8: 00 am – 9: 00 am