The flare and buttress roots appear healthy Probing

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The flare and buttress roots appear healthy. Probing showed that the roots on the

The flare and buttress roots appear healthy. Probing showed that the roots on the house side go downward, away from the foundation.

Rapid closure of Pruning wounds is a Good sign of tree Vitality.

Rapid closure of Pruning wounds is a Good sign of tree Vitality.

Green arrow shows trunk spreading at contact point. Red arrow points to poison ivy

Green arrow shows trunk spreading at contact point. Red arrow points to poison ivy vine growing out of decay Within the trunk.

Probes show decay extends >8” below the Surface of the soil, where the wood

Probes show decay extends >8” below the Surface of the soil, where the wood is spongy.

At the top of the image is a large (6”+) wound made when the

At the top of the image is a large (6”+) wound made when the central Stem was amputated, or “topped”. This wound is positioned to be cracked by the Sun, and collect fungal spores along with polluted rainwater. This wound will decay before it can close, so decay will move downward through the stem. The bottom of the image is another wound. It has a small ring of Woundwood starting to grow, but this wound also is likely to decay before it closes. (The lack of growth at the bottom of this ring Indicates the cut was too large. ) These two decayed areas have the potential to join forces, and Continue decaying the inner core, where the tree has no defenses. When the decay gets to the main fork, it could coalesce with the rot pocket that nourished the two 12’ vines growing out Of it. This illustrates the reason why pruning cuts should be less than 4” in size. Central leaders have more heartwood, and less defenses, So this kind of “topping” is not an approved pruning method.

Large wound made by branch Amputation damages tree Structure. The wound will decay before

Large wound made by branch Amputation damages tree Structure. The wound will decay before it closes, and the loss of Damping effect from this Inner branch is causing the Upper and outer branches to move more. This movement causes the Trunk to move more, Increasing the damage to the house and the strain on the decayed fork. In this way, excessive pruning Increases tree risk.

The adjacent tulip poplar Strikes the crown of the White oak when the wind

The adjacent tulip poplar Strikes the crown of the White oak when the wind blows. This inhibits the white oak From growing away from the house, forcing it to grow More over the house. The tulip poplar should be pruned so there is at least 10 -12’ clearance between The trees. The leaning stem of the oak Should be reduced, to Lessen movement.

Tulip poplar on the left contacts the white oak, Training it to grow toward

Tulip poplar on the left contacts the white oak, Training it to grow toward the house.

Long limb on the white Oak growing to the east. Reducing the limb will

Long limb on the white Oak growing to the east. Reducing the limb will lessen: Movement, Loading on the fork, trunk, and roots, Risk of tree failure, and Risk to the house and the occupants.