The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer

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The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 -1400) n Dominant literary figure in the 14 th century

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343 -1400) n Dominant literary figure in the 14 th century n “Father of English Literature” n Life experiences --child of wealthy wine merchant --page in a royal household --spoke French, Latin, & Italian --Soldier & diplomat --member of Parliament

Geoffrey Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales n lived and wrote around 1385 A. D.

Geoffrey Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales n lived and wrote around 1385 A. D. n planned many more tales, but did not complete the proposed 120 tales before his death n wrote about all classes in The Canterbury Tales to give us a glimpse of English society at the time n Mama’s & Papas (California Dreaming) https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=v. Ba 5 n. N_Jy. Pk

Geoffrey Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales (cont. ) n He went against tradition—should have

Geoffrey Chaucer and The Canterbury Tales (cont. ) n He went against tradition—should have written in French BUT he wrote them in Middle English n “Father of the English Language” because he defied rules/law and wrote in the people’s language

Chaucer Images

Chaucer Images

The Middle Ages Background Hierarchy – Class Structure During Chaucer’s Time Nobility/Ruling Class Knight

The Middle Ages Background Hierarchy – Class Structure During Chaucer’s Time Nobility/Ruling Class Knight and Squire Clergy - Monk, Friar, Prioress, Parson, Summoner, Pardoner Middle Class – Merchant, Doctor, Student, Wife of Bath Peasants – Miller, Plowman, Skipper

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (cont. ) 30 characters representing all social classes --Chaucer, as a

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (cont. ) 30 characters representing all social classes --Chaucer, as a parody of himself, is one of the pilgrims --Although fictional, does have realistic settings and occupations *Tabard Inn *Canterbury & Canterbury Cathedral *Shrine of Thomas Becket n Chaucer’s tone: IRONIC n

Journal Responses The Canterbury Tales The Prologue n What makes a good character? n

Journal Responses The Canterbury Tales The Prologue n What makes a good character? n Why are first impressions so important? n Does Chaucer judge characters by the way they look? n Did Chaucer base his pilgrims on real-life individuals from his day? n Analyze the characters in the prologue from a historical perspective.

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales n Takes representatives of English society on a pilgrimage to Canterbury

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales n Takes representatives of English society on a pilgrimage to Canterbury Cathedral n Pilgrims—each has speech and tale that matches a real person during his (Chaucer’s) time

Vocabulary n n n n Allegories Inferences Metaphors Irony Personification Context Clues Connotation Hyperbole

Vocabulary n n n n Allegories Inferences Metaphors Irony Personification Context Clues Connotation Hyperbole Characterization Speculation Drawing Conclusions Diction Idioms Frame/Narrative Story Satire Stereotype

List of 30 Pilgrims § § § Narrator – line 20 Knight – line

List of 30 Pilgrims § § § Narrator – line 20 Knight – line 43 Squire – line 81 Yeoman – line 103 Nun, Prioress (+ 3) – line 122 Monk – line 169 Friar – line 212 Merchant – line 280 Oxford Cleric – line 295 Sergeant at Law – line 319 Franklin – line 341 Guildsmen – (Haberdasher, Dyer, Carpenter, Weaver, Carpet-Maker) - line 371 §Cook – line 390 §Skipper – line 398 §Doctor – line 421 §Wife of Bath – line 455 §Parson – line 488 §Plowman – line 539 §Miller – line 561 §Manciple – line 585 §Reeve – line 605 §Summoner - line 641 §Pardoner – line 689 §Host – line 766

The Prologue Thirty pilgrims are on their way to Canterbury to pay homage at

The Prologue Thirty pilgrims are on their way to Canterbury to pay homage at Becket’s tomb. n Each agrees to tell two tales on the way to the shrine and two tales back. n The winner will receive a supper paid for by all. n

Assignment: Pilgrim Presentations n Read the description of your pilgrim in the prologue n

Assignment: Pilgrim Presentations n Read the description of your pilgrim in the prologue n Present a Power. Point chart to the class with your findings n TWO SLIDES n Any format, font, style you like… n Must contain the following information:

Slide One n Title (pilgrim’s name) n Picture of your pilgrim (according to description

Slide One n Title (pilgrim’s name) n Picture of your pilgrim (according to description given) n Specific quotes and phrases that provide evidence of your pilgrim’s – Physical characteristics, clothing, and accessories – Words, experiences, personality traits

Slide Two n Social class and why n Inferences (Chaucer’s commentary) – Specific lines

Slide Two n Social class and why n Inferences (Chaucer’s commentary) – Specific lines that lead to inferences about your pilgrim – Does he/she uphold the proper values of his or her social position? Any vices or virtues? – What is Chaucer criticizing?

Knight’s Code of Chivalry A knight must be: 1. true to his God and

Knight’s Code of Chivalry A knight must be: 1. true to his God and a defender of the faith. 2. true and loyal to his lord and king. 3. true to his lady. 4. humble and modest in daily actions. 5. brave and fierce in war and adversity.

Code of the Clergy A member of the clergy must: 1. be chaste and

Code of the Clergy A member of the clergy must: 1. be chaste and pure. 2. be devoted to God. 3. obey God and Biblical law. 4. take vows of poverty. 5. achieve heavenly reward through earthly denial.

Moral Virtues (opposite of sins) n n n n Moderation Generosity Diligence Love Modesty

Moral Virtues (opposite of sins) n n n n Moderation Generosity Diligence Love Modesty Humility Forgiveness

Seven Deadly Sins n n n n Gluttony Avarice / Greed Sloth Lust Vanity

Seven Deadly Sins n n n n Gluttony Avarice / Greed Sloth Lust Vanity Pride Anger

THE MILLER Example Physical Characteristics, Clothing, and Accessories n n n n Chap of

THE MILLER Example Physical Characteristics, Clothing, and Accessories n n n n Chap of sixteen stone (561) Big in brawn and bone (562) Broad, knotty and short-shouldered (565) Broad, red beard (568 -569) Wart with red, bristly hair growing on his nose (571 -572) Black nostrils and mighty mouth (573 -575) Carried a sword and buckler (574) and bagpipes (583) Wore blue hood with a white coat (582) Words, Experiences, and Personality Traits § Likes to wrestle (564) § Boastful of his strength (565 -567) § Likes to tell dirty jokes (576 -577) § Thief and cheater (578 -581)

The Miller n Peasant Class n Inferences – Supported by a trade – Chaucer

The Miller n Peasant Class n Inferences – Supported by a trade – Chaucer compares him to a sow and fox suggesting he is wild and rough (568, 571) – Chaucer compares mouth to a furnace door, suggesting he is uncouth and foul-mouthed (575) – By stating he was a “master-hand” at stealing, Chaucer infers the miller has cheated customers his whole life (578). Major vice! – Through his depiction of the miller as bawdy and belligerent, Chaucer is critiquing the peasant’s low station in life

Journal The Canterbury Tales What does radix malorum est cupiditas mean? n “Have you

Journal The Canterbury Tales What does radix malorum est cupiditas mean? n “Have you ever received a warning that you did not heed? How does that help you predict what will happen to the rioters? (173) n Analyze- How does the rioters’ end support the lesson that the desire for money is the root of evil? n Evaluate- Do the rioters get what they deserve? n

Journals The Canterbury Tales – The “Pardoner’s Tale” n What details in the image

Journals The Canterbury Tales – The “Pardoner’s Tale” n What details in the image on (171) reflect the Pardoner’s description of his preaching? n How does the picture of the old man support the Pardoner’s description of him? (175) n Pardoner’s Tale in Rap: http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=cn. VLLQn a 1 -c

The Canterbury Tales n Panel Discussion – “The Pardoner’s Tale” Kagan – Read, Write

The Canterbury Tales n Panel Discussion – “The Pardoner’s Tale” Kagan – Read, Write Round Robin n Panel Discussion – “The Wife of Bath” Kagan - Read, Write Round Robin Evaluate the plot – Review lines 404 -432. Is the conclusion of the story satisfying? In your response, consider the knight’s crime and the outcome of his actions (197).

Journals “The Wife of Bath” The Big Question Do men understand women? § In

Journals “The Wife of Bath” The Big Question Do men understand women? § In lines 57 -64, how does the opening of the Wife of Bath’s tale illustrate an extreme case of a man who has no understanding of women> n Does the picture of the Wife of Bath reflect the personality of the characters as revealed in the text? (185) n Based on the illustration, how does the knight feel about the old woman? How does she feel about him? (193) n