Syndicate 1 Claire Nikki Amber Angela Prohibition seemed

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Syndicate # 1 Claire Nikki Amber Angela

Syndicate # 1 Claire Nikki Amber Angela

“Prohibition seemed to offer the promise of a great cure-all for poverty, corruption, and

“Prohibition seemed to offer the promise of a great cure-all for poverty, corruption, and crime. ” - Bill Severn

Events leading up to Prohibition: The 1920’s: A decade of contrast 1. Freedom on

Events leading up to Prohibition: The 1920’s: A decade of contrast 1. Freedom on dress, behavior, and sexual attitudes were conflicting with ideals of the New Puritanism. 2. Traditional small town ways of life clashed with new urban ways. 3. Religious fundamentalism went under rebirth and many people tried to hold on to the traditional morals and values. 4. The Anglo-Saxon class, the most influential group in American society, began to decline. Decline of Anglo-Saxon class 1. They typically were: descendants of early European settlers, People with responsibility in communities, educated, favored less government involvement. 2. Tried to hold their power in American Society by: Immigration restriction, Anti-Semitism, joining KKK, maintaining economic control.

 • Prohibition was not first seen in the 1920’s – 1. Maine Law

• Prohibition was not first seen in the 1920’s – 1. Maine Law of 1881 prohibited the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors in the state of Maine. – 2. 1855 - 13 out of 31 states gad prohibition similar to Maine. – 3. 1870 - Women’s Christian Temperance Union formed to further cause of temperance. • Population Explosion • (described in 1910 -1911) – 1. Birth rates of immigrants and poor native-born American exceeded those of Anglo-Saxon. – 2. Many of these new Americans settled in large states. – 3. Republican party had been based among Protestants in small towns; big cities showed growth in Catholic and Jewish populations.

Prohibitionists • 1. Represented the desires and ideals of the Anglo-Saxon establishment. • 2.

Prohibitionists • 1. Represented the desires and ideals of the Anglo-Saxon establishment. • 2. Typically were from small towns, middle class, immigrants, Jews and Catholics. • 3. Many thought drinking liquor was immoral, some wanted power taken from urban political machines, some wanted to further personal political careers.

Women’s Christian Temperance Union • - formed by Frances Willard in 1873 • -

Women’s Christian Temperance Union • - formed by Frances Willard in 1873 • - goal was ending production, sale, and consumption of alcohol • - composed of mostly women angered by men who abused their wives and children

Anti-Saloon League • • formed in 1893 by Howard Hyde Russell believed in working

Anti-Saloon League • • formed in 1893 by Howard Hyde Russell believed in working within existing party system developed highly successful lobbying techniques had support from business men who believed liquor was slowly production • Organized local-option campaigns in which small towns banned liquor within their geographical limits.

Prohibition Party • Political party formed in 1869 • Their aim was abolition of

Prohibition Party • Political party formed in 1869 • Their aim was abolition of liquor trafficking • James Black was the 1 st presidential candidate. • They wanted to enhance freedom and dignity of the individual and protect the welfare of the family.

Prohibition- the “Noble Experiment” • • - 1920 - 1933 18 th Amendment Volstead

Prohibition- the “Noble Experiment” • • - 1920 - 1933 18 th Amendment Volstead Act Federal Prohibition Bureau

Why Prohibition? • • End drunkenness Eliminate alcohol related deaths Decrease crime Abolish the

Why Prohibition? • • End drunkenness Eliminate alcohol related deaths Decrease crime Abolish the saloon Safer roads Different uses for money Decrease taxes Moral grandeur

Benefits of Prohibition • Helped worker efficiency • Milk consumption • Effects on public

Benefits of Prohibition • Helped worker efficiency • Milk consumption • Effects on public health

Reasons that prohibition failed 1. MONEY- government corruption -government spending to keep alcohol out

Reasons that prohibition failed 1. MONEY- government corruption -government spending to keep alcohol out increased - price of alcohol increased. 2. ALCOHOL- increase in sales, and potency -age at which one first started drinking dropped - Iron Law of Prohibition by Richard Cowan

3. CRIMES- increase in other illegal drugs - more bootlegging -smuggling of alcohol -organized

3. CRIMES- increase in other illegal drugs - more bootlegging -smuggling of alcohol -organized gangs formed to make distilleries - prisons became full 4. HEALTH HAZARDS- bootlegged alcohol would be mixed with toxic chemicals - death rate increased due to toxins REPEAL OF PROHIBITION- began death march of prohibition in Feb. 1933 - Great Depression - 21 st Amendment passed