Sustained Silent Reading BUILDING SUCCESSFUL READERS SSR Defined

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Sustained Silent Reading: BUILDING SUCCESSFUL READERS

Sustained Silent Reading: BUILDING SUCCESSFUL READERS

SSR Defined • Students read whatever they like. • Short time-span, 15 to 20

SSR Defined • Students read whatever they like. • Short time-span, 15 to 20 minutes, • Every day during school

Goals and Benefits of SSR Light reading can be a powerful conduit to more

Goals and Benefits of SSR Light reading can be a powerful conduit to more difficult reading (Cho and Krashen, 1994) • Increase student reading proficiency – Comprehension – Build a belief in self as a better reader – Achievement • Improve student motivation to read – Make reading for pleasure acceptable (secondary level) – Increase outside (home) reading for pleasure – Increase the range of resources for pleasure reading – Develop lifelong love of reading • Facilitate overall language development – Oral – Written

Research Base • In-school free reading programs show outstanding results in promoting the development

Research Base • In-school free reading programs show outstanding results in promoting the development of reading comprehension (Krashen, 1998)

Research Base • In a study of 27 countries, there was a steady upward

Research Base • In a study of 27 countries, there was a steady upward trend in achievement in school populations which engaged in the greatest amount of free voluntary reading. (Elley, 1992)

Research Base • Research in vocabulary development supports reading books over direct instruction. (Anderson,

Research Base • Research in vocabulary development supports reading books over direct instruction. (Anderson, 1996; Krashen, 1993; Nagy and Herman, 1987)

Research Base • In a longitudinal study, students who participated in a free reading

Research Base • In a longitudinal study, students who participated in a free reading program were reading more books—up to 6 years later- compared with students from a comparison school in which no program was offered. (Greaney and Clark 1975)

Research Base • After reviewing 32 studies, Pilgreen (2000) concluded that SSR provided the

Research Base • After reviewing 32 studies, Pilgreen (2000) concluded that SSR provided the same or better benefits for students, in the area of comprehension and motivation, as traditional skills classes.

8 Factors for SSR Success The SSR Handbook by Janice L. Pilgreen • Access

8 Factors for SSR Success The SSR Handbook by Janice L. Pilgreen • Access to books • Book Appeal • Conducive environment • Encouragement to read • Non-accountability • Distributed time to read • Staff training • Follow-up activities

1. Access to Books • Trade books, magazines, comics, newspapers etc. • Materials are

1. Access to Books • Trade books, magazines, comics, newspapers etc. • Materials are provided directly to students – Develop classroom libraries (grants, PTA, garage sales, book clubs, book fairs) – Rotate materials – Book Exchanges/Trades – Regularly scheduled trips to libraries (school & community) – Interlibrary loans • Students not required to bring something from home to read (MAKE IT EASY FOR THEM!)

2. Book Appeal • Offer materials that are interesting – – Use an Interest

2. Book Appeal • Offer materials that are interesting – – Use an Interest Inventory with students Use teen book lists Variety of genres Include read-along books and tapes • Self-selection is crucial in order to develop a sense of ownership and purpose • Offer a range of readability levels • Display materials attractively • When asked, help a student find a good book match

3. Conducive Environment • Provide a quiet, uninterrupted environment • Seating that is not

3. Conducive Environment • Provide a quiet, uninterrupted environment • Seating that is not cramped • Homey furnishings may add to the appeal but are not required. – Posters, pictures – Rugs, pillows, lighting, comfort seating, plants – Play soft music (only if accepted by everyone) • After silent reading students may be given time to share their reading informally with friends

4. Encouragement to Read • Share the research findings with students—it’s good news •

4. Encouragement to Read • Share the research findings with students—it’s good news • Adult modeling of reading – Share personal habits of reading – Move from desk and sit with students as you read – Share books that you are reading • Need all staff support to encourage students to engage in free reading • Special time with teacher after SSR to discuss the materials read • Teacher read-aloud after SSR followed by sharing and discussion • SSR followed by sharing “good parts” with friends • Parent involvement – Input in development of the SSR program – Suggested ideas to support at-home reading

5. Staff Training • Develop roles as active facilitators in helping students connect with

5. Staff Training • Develop roles as active facilitators in helping students connect with books • Present current literature on benefits of SSR • Establish practical guidelines • Teach strategies for linking students with books • Highlight importance of all adults “buying into” concept of free reading • Provide support and opportunity to work together to build the program

6. Non-Accountabilty • Provide a non-evaluative atmosphere • No requirements related to productive tasks

6. Non-Accountabilty • Provide a non-evaluative atmosphere • No requirements related to productive tasks or follow-up language work • Students allowed to stop reading a book if they find it uninteresting and encouraged to pick up another one. • Emphasis is on the pleasure of reading

7. Follow-up Activities • Goal is to sustain student excitement about books they are

7. Follow-up Activities • Goal is to sustain student excitement about books they are reading in a non-evaluative setting • Peer discussions, literacy circles, • Book sharing, peer read-alouds – Might need to develop a waiting list • Sell book choices to others – News anchor – Design book covers – Use art, music, science, role-playing

8. Distributed Time to Read • Give between 15 – 30 minutes of reading

8. Distributed Time to Read • Give between 15 – 30 minutes of reading time • Minimum of twice a week • Goal is for free reading to become a habit

Liberty Middle School SSR Program • **Principal is leading and supporting the program •

Liberty Middle School SSR Program • **Principal is leading and supporting the program • SSR is part of our SIP: Read & Writing across the curriculum • SSR is part of weekly communication • All teachers are taking ownership • Mornings begin with 15 – 20 minutes of SSR (except Fridays).

Teacher and Program Support • SSR was introduced during 1 st faculty meeting with

Teacher and Program Support • SSR was introduced during 1 st faculty meeting with a book preview & share activity – Principal read an excerpt from a book and then shared with faculty the impact of the book – Book Pass activity • Quick Review of research and philosophy of SSR • Supply teachers with what they need to implement program – Handout • Suggesting methods for building a classroom library • Listing school resources available (librarian & library, PTA, parents) • Listing local resources available (libraries, bookstores) – Copies of reading logs: teacher’s choice

Teacher and Program Support • Displays – Classrooms – Hallways • Communications – –

Teacher and Program Support • Displays – Classrooms – Hallways • Communications – – – Weekly SSR tip Special SSR news: circulation stats SSR Emails from principal News articles in local paper Book Corner articles: teachers write about book they are reading – Board presentations

Effects of SSR as seen in the Library • Greater circulation • Fewer over-dues

Effects of SSR as seen in the Library • Greater circulation • Fewer over-dues • Students requesting help finding another good book • Running out of books for certain students • More interlibrary loans • Greater use of community library-students signing up for library cards

Comments by Students & Teachers • “I don’t know what this book by Brian

Comments by Students & Teachers • “I don’t know what this book by Brian Jacques is about, but all my friends in class can’t seem to put it down. So I’m going to read it and find out why. ” (student) • 1 month later: “Now I know why my friends read these books. I’m on my third one. ” (student) • “I’m not a reader, but I have to admit that I’ve already read 4 books this semester. And what’s even more amazing is that I have a book on my Christmas List!” (Teacher)

Resources • The SSR Handbook: How to Organize and Manage a Sustained Silent Reading

Resources • The SSR Handbook: How to Organize and Manage a Sustained Silent Reading Program by Janice L. Pilgreen • Are They Really Reading? : Expanding SSR in the Middle Grades by Jodi Crum Marshall • Susan Martin: [email protected] k 12. mo. us

Book Pass Activity • • • 5 to 10 books displayed on table Look

Book Pass Activity • • • 5 to 10 books displayed on table Look at jacket, title, author Read book flap information Read two or three pages Pass the book on Continue

Displays

Displays

Displays

Displays

LMC Circulation Statistics – 2002 -2003 LMS & SV (1300 students) 2003 -2004 LM

LMC Circulation Statistics – 2002 -2003 LMS & SV (1300 students) 2003 -2004 LM (700 students) September: 1374 1497 October: 1562 1296 November: 1274 1156 December: 973 997