Subject Lines Fragmentation Construction and Computing Johndan JohnsonEilola

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Subject Lines: Fragmentation, Construction, and Computing Johndan Johnson-Eilola Clarkson University mailto: johndan@clarkson. edu http:

Subject Lines: Fragmentation, Construction, and Computing Johndan Johnson-Eilola Clarkson University mailto: [email protected] edu http: //www. clarkson. edu/~johndan/ 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Space + Motion = Subjectivity • Why does Microsoft Word suck? • Why do

Space + Motion = Subjectivity • Why does Microsoft Word suck? • Why do we still primarily browse the web? • Are we going anywhere? 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

MS Word 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

MS Word 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Dreamweaver 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Dreamweaver 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Office Wall 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Office Wall 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

From Time to Space The great obsession of the nineteenth century was, as we

From Time to Space The great obsession of the nineteenth century was, as we know, history: with its themes of development and of suspension, of crisis and cycle, themes of the everaccumulating past, with its great preponderance of dead men and the menacing glaciation of the world. The nineteenth century found its essential mythological resources in the second principle of thermodynamics. The present epoch will perhaps be above all the epoch of space. We are in the epoch of simultaneity: we are in the epoch of juxtaposition, the epoch of the near and the far, of the side-by-side, of the dispersed. We are at the moment, I believe, when our experience of the world is less that of a long life developing through time than that of a network that connects points and intersects with its own skein. One could perhaps say that certain ideological conflicts animating present-day polemics oppose the pious descendants of time and the determined inhabitants of space. Michel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces, ” p. 23 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Theories (I) • Foucault: From History to Space, Microphysics of Power • Jameson: The

Theories (I) • Foucault: From History to Space, Microphysics of Power • Jameson: The Sentence Involves the Subject Uniting Past and Future in the Present • Ronnell: The Telephone Call, Technologies Socially Constructing Hailed Subjects 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Theories (II) • Marvin: Technologies, Developers, Marketers, and Users Mutually Constructing Each Other •

Theories (II) • Marvin: Technologies, Developers, Marketers, and Users Mutually Constructing Each Other • Feenberg: Primary and Secondary Moments of Technology Development and Use • Reich: Symbolic-Analytic Work • Hall: Articulation Theory 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Articulation Theory An articulation is. . . the form of the connection that can

Articulation Theory An articulation is. . . the form of the connection that can be made between two different elements, under certain conditions. It is a linkage which is not necessary, determined, absolute and essential for all time. You have to ask, under what circumstances can a connection be forged or made? So the so-called ‘unity’ of a discourse is really the articulation of different, distinct elements which can be rearticulated in different ways because they have no necessary ‘belongingness’. The ‘unity’ which matters is a linkage between that articulated discourse and the social forces with which it can, under certain historical conditions, but need not necessarily, be connected. Stuart Hall, “On Postmodernism and Articulation, ” p. 141 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Articulation Theory • Ideology is structured like language • No necessary correspondences, but no

Articulation Theory • Ideology is structured like language • No necessary correspondences, but no necessary non-correspondences • Local rather than global/universal • Open to change 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Symbolic-Analytic Work • Identify, rearrange, circulate, abstract, and broker information • Principle work materials

Symbolic-Analytic Work • Identify, rearrange, circulate, abstract, and broker information • Principle work materials are information and symbols, their principle products are reports, plans, and proposals • Frequently work online, either communicating with peers (they rarely have direct organizational supervision) or manipulating symbols with the help of various computer tools • Job titles include investment banker, research scientist, lawyer, management consultant, strategic planner, and architect. 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Maps of Use 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Maps of Use 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Problems • Tendency still towards unity, linearity (or, at best, hierarchy) • Tendency still

Problems • Tendency still towards unity, linearity (or, at best, hierarchy) • Tendency still towards single views • Creation still enmeshed in Romantic view of genius/production • Lack environments for writing in, and as fragments 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Or, • We continue to believe in the myth of unity. • From Adam

Or, • We continue to believe in the myth of unity. • From Adam and Eve • To the World Wide Web 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

(re)Articulation Processes • Recursive figure on (re) articulation: totality > disarticulation > fragmentation >

(re)Articulation Processes • Recursive figure on (re) articulation: totality > disarticulation > fragmentation > rearticulation > totality • (Notes about totalitarianism) 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Maps of Production 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Maps of Production 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Comparing Subject Constructions • History constructs a continuous subject (mythical, but accepted) • Microsoft

Comparing Subject Constructions • History constructs a continuous subject (mythical, but accepted) • Microsoft Word as a reading and writing environment 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Writing in MS Word • Top down, left right • Moving in a rough

Writing in MS Word • Top down, left right • Moving in a rough line • Layout (2 D) subordinated (but somewhat available) • Pages in linear order 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Equals Reading in MS Word • Top down, left right • Moving in a

Equals Reading in MS Word • Top down, left right • Moving in a rough line • Layout (2 D) subordinated (but somewhat available) • Pages in linear order 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Reading the Web • 2 D Layout of Page • Multi-linear (macrostructure) • But

Reading the Web • 2 D Layout of Page • Multi-linear (macrostructure) • But still linear • Texts are relatively fixed and distant (uninhabited) 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Writing the Web • 2 D Layout of Page • 2 D Layout of

Writing the Web • 2 D Layout of Page • 2 D Layout of Textspace (macrostructure) • Time Colonized • Writing Becomes More Spatial 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Listening to Music (II) • i. Tunes • Simple Playlist – Linear – Receptive

Listening to Music (II) • i. Tunes • Simple Playlist – Linear – Receptive • Smart Playlist – Contingent – More spatial – Music collection becomes a database 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Producing Music • • • 28 february 2003 Fragments Rearrangement Transformation Spatial Recursive Database-like

Producing Music • • • 28 february 2003 Fragments Rearrangement Transformation Spatial Recursive Database-like johnson-eilola

Flaming Lips • Parking Lot Experiments • Zaireeka 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Flaming Lips • Parking Lot Experiments • Zaireeka 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Turntablism • Production from Consumption • Awareness of History Through Sampling • Awareness of

Turntablism • Production from Consumption • Awareness of History Through Sampling • Awareness of History Through Performance (Funk 101) • Scratch Notation (DJ Radar, etc. ) 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Composition as Articulation • Multiple forms of “composition” (writing, design, production) • Bridging Production

Composition as Articulation • Multiple forms of “composition” (writing, design, production) • Bridging Production and Consumption • Beyond Consumerism • Weblogs as Productive Web Use 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Weblogs • Linear + Spatial • Individual + Social • Fragmentation + Totality 28

Weblogs • Linear + Spatial • Individual + Social • Fragmentation + Totality 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Weblog Writing/Reading Spaces • Net. News. Wire • News. Monster • Tinderbox 28 february

Weblog Writing/Reading Spaces • Net. News. Wire • News. Monster • Tinderbox 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Net. News. Wire 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Net. News. Wire 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

News. Monster 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

News. Monster 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Tinderbox 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Tinderbox 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola

Conclusions: Where Do You Want to Build Today? • Understanding the mutual construction of

Conclusions: Where Do You Want to Build Today? • Understanding the mutual construction of tech development and use • Moving beyond unity without ending in fragmentation • Building a sense of history without determinism • Moving from a passive to an active reading/using subject 28 february 2003 johnson-eilola