Student Organization Risk Management Managing the Risks Learn

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Student Organization Risk Management Managing the Risks: Learn. Succeed. Live.

Student Organization Risk Management Managing the Risks: Learn. Succeed. Live.

 • As an officer, you are responsible for presenting this information to your

• As an officer, you are responsible for presenting this information to your organization. • NOTE: There will be a quiz at the conclusion of this presentation.

SGO Student Governance & Organizations • Where are we located? – Basement of the

SGO Student Governance & Organizations • Where are we located? – Basement of the University Center (UC) • Home to 300+ student organizations • Website – http: //www. uta. edu/sgo – http: //mavorgs. uta. edu – Student Organization Handbook

Risk Management Managing the Risks: Learn. Succeed. Live.

Risk Management Managing the Risks: Learn. Succeed. Live.

Risk Management? Defined • Risk Management… – considers the potential and perceived risk involved

Risk Management? Defined • Risk Management… – considers the potential and perceived risk involved in student events and programs. – includes monitoring organization activities. – Involves taking both proactive action and corrective steps to minimize accidental injury and/or loss.

Risk Management Legislation HB 2639/SB 1138—effective September 1, 2007 80 th Texas Legislature; Texas

Risk Management Legislation HB 2639/SB 1138—effective September 1, 2007 80 th Texas Legislature; Texas Education Code § 51. 9361 [Mandates risk management education for members and advisors of student organizations registered at postsecondary educational institutions. ] • Who? • Representatives of registered student organizations • Advisors • Individuals selected by the University • What? • Complete a risk management educational program.

Risk Items • Alcohol • Hazing • Sexual Assault and Harassment • Student Travel

Risk Items • Alcohol • Hazing • Sexual Assault and Harassment • Student Travel • Fire and Safety Issues • Behavior • (on or off campus)

Alcohol 21 • The minimum age for purchasing and possessing alcohol is 21.

Alcohol 21 • The minimum age for purchasing and possessing alcohol is 21.

Alcohol Facts • 1, 825 college students (ages 18 to 24) die from alcohol-related

Alcohol Facts • 1, 825 college students (ages 18 to 24) die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes a • 599, 000 students (ages of 18 to 24) are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol a • 400, 000 students (ages 18 to 24) had unprotected sex and more than 100, 000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex b • 25% of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall c a (Hingson et al. , 2009); b (Hingson et al. , 2002); c (Engs et al. , 1996; Presley et al. , 1996 a, 1996 b; Wechsler et al. , 2002)

Alcohol Policy [HOP 3 -700] • Minimum disciplinary penalty—suspension … for a specified period

Alcohol Policy [HOP 3 -700] • Minimum disciplinary penalty—suspension … for a specified period of time or suspension of rights and privileges, or both, for conduct related to the use, possession, or distribution of drugs that are prohibited by state, federal, or local law. • Suspension or expulsion notations become part of your permanent academic transcript. • Other penalties include • • • disciplinary probation payment for damage to property suspension of rights and privileges suspension for a specified period of time expulsion, or such other penalty as deemed appropriate under the circumstances of the incident at hand.

Alcohol Managing the Risks • If your organization gathers as a group in an

Alcohol Managing the Risks • If your organization gathers as a group in an off campus location that serves alcohol provide the following: • Sober designated driver(s) for those that are drinking. • Do not participate in “drinking games. ” • If you suspect severe alcohol impairment, call for help immediately. • Follow all University and Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) regulations. [www. uta. edu/studentgovernace, www. tabc. state. tx. us] • Provide an alcohol education program for your members. • Know your campus resources.

What is HAZING?

What is HAZING?

Hazing Defined Hazing is any activity expected of someone joining or participating in a

Hazing Defined Hazing is any activity expected of someone joining or participating in a group that humiliates, degrades, abuses, or endangers them regardless of a person’s willingness to participate. http: //www. hazingstudy. org/

Hazing Facts • 55% of college students involved in clubs, teams, and organizations experience

Hazing Facts • 55% of college students involved in clubs, teams, and organizations experience hazing • 25% of advisors and coaches were aware of the group’s hazing behaviors • 25% of hazing occurs on-campus in public space • In more than half of hazing incidents, a member of the offending group posts pictures on a public web space • 95% of cases are not reported to campus officials • 47% of students come to college having already experienced hazing (Allan & Maddan, 2008)

Hazing Policy [§ 51. 936 Texas Education Code] • UT Arlington—ZERO TOLERANCE • Neither

Hazing Policy [§ 51. 936 Texas Education Code] • UT Arlington—ZERO TOLERANCE • Neither tolerates excuses nor does it acknowledge different levels of hazing, i. e. “it was just a little hazing”. • In an effort to encourage the reporting of hazing incidents, the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event and immunizes that person from participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from that report. • Failure to report: a fine of up to $2, 000, up to 180 days in jail, or both. Penalties for other hazing offenses range from $500 to $10, 000 in fines and up to two years confinement. An individual can be personally sued and wages garnished if found guilty. • Criminal charges and University sanctions may be applied to both the individual and the student organization for hazing offenses.

Hazing Managing the Risks • Hazing should not be viewed as a tradition to

Hazing Managing the Risks • Hazing should not be viewed as a tradition to pass on to new members. • If you suspect a task or event is hazing related, report it immediately to the Office of Student Conduct, Fraternity & Sorority Life, or Student Governance & Organizations. • Come up with constructive bonding exercises for your group. • Ask yourself if your group’s actions can be defended in a court of law. If not, then you need to exercise good judgment and discontinue those actions.

Sexual Assault & Harassment • Sexual Harassment – Sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,

Sexual Assault & Harassment • Sexual Harassment – Sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or sexually-oriented conduct that is considered unwanted or offensive by the target of the conduct. • Sexual Assault – Includes non-consensual intercourse, nonconsensual sexual penetration with an object, and unwanted touching or kissing. • Sexual Exploitation – Any form of sexual behavior whereby the result is that one or more individuals gain advantage over another through deliberate deceit or trickery.

Sexual Assault & Harassment Facts • More than 25% of victims are between 18

Sexual Assault & Harassment Facts • More than 25% of victims are between 18 & 24 years old. a • A college with 10, 000 students could experience as many as 350 rapes per year. b • In 80 -90% of cases, victim and assailant know each other; and the more intimate the relationship, the more likely it is for a rape to be completed. b • Males make up 10% of all victims. c • Fewer than 5% of completed and attempted rapes of college women are reported. b a Rand, M. R. U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. (2009). Criminal victimization (NCJ 227777). Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics b Fisher, B. S. , Cullen, F. T. , & Turner, M. G. U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women (NCJ 182369). Washington DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. c. U. S. Department of Justice. 2005 National Crime Victimization Study. 2005.

Sexual Assault & Harassment Policy [HOP Procedure 14 -1] • Every member of the

Sexual Assault & Harassment Policy [HOP Procedure 14 -1] • Every member of the University community, whether they are a student, faculty, staff, administrator, visitor, invitee of the University of Texas at Arlington or participant in a UTA sponsored program should be aware that the University does not tolerate sexual or relationship violence. • Sexual Violence/Assault is also prohibited by Federal law, by State Law as listed in the Texas Penal Code Section – Sexual Assault—§ 22. 011. – Aggravated sexual assault—§ 22. 021 – Relationship Violence—Texas Family Code § 71. 0021 – Stalking—§ 42. 072 – UTA Student Conduct Code found in the UTA Handbook of Operating Procedures

Sexual Assault & Harassment Managing the Risks • Promote safety at social events –Do

Sexual Assault & Harassment Managing the Risks • Promote safety at social events –Do not leave drinks unattended –Have a designated sober person at all events –Use the buddy-system • Be a positive bystander –During or after an incident, always seek help • UTA Police Department • 24 -Hour Sexual Assault Advocate Hotline • Your advisor Website: www. uta. edu/rvsp 24 -Hour Sexual Assault Advocate Hotline: (817) 272 -0260 RVSP Coordinator: (817) 272 -9250

Student Travel Defined • Student travel incorporates any travel planned or sponsored by the

Student Travel Defined • Student travel incorporates any travel planned or sponsored by the student organization or its members as part of the organizations’ activities.

Student Travel Facts • Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for

Student Travel Facts • Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death for 15 -20 year-olds. • Each year, approximately 19% of the fatalities in the U. S. are related to young-driver crashes. • Speeding is a contributing factor in 31% of all fatal crashes. • 64% of young drivers in passenger vehicles involved in alcohol-related fatal crashes were not wearing a safety belt. (NHTSA, 2009)

Student Travel Policy [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6] • A Student/Group Travel Form

Student Travel Policy [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6] • A Student/Group Travel Form and the University Request for Travel Authorization is required at least 10 days prior to the date of travel for groups that wish to: – Travel more than 25 miles from the University campus – Use University funding (Program Assistance Funds obtained through Student Congress) – Use a vehicle that is owned or leased by the University – Attendance is required by the student organization • Please contact The Office of Student Governance & Organizations for assistance with your organizational travel at 817 -272 -2293 or www. uta. edu/studentgovernance.

Student Travel Managing the Risks [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6] • Seat belts

Student Travel Managing the Risks [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6] • Seat belts are required for ALL the occupants – it’s the law! • Alcohol and other illegal substances are strictly prohibited. • Make sure the driver/s are in possession of a valid Drivers License. • • For trips that are over 2 hours long, it is strongly recommended you have a navigator to assist with the trip. • Drivers cannot operate the vehicle for more than 3 hours without a minimum 15 minute break.

Student Travel Managing the Risks [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6 ] • Driving

Student Travel Managing the Risks [Regents’ Rule 50601; HOP Chapter 6 ] • Driving between the hours of 11 p. m. and 6 a. m. is not allowed without prior approval. • Do not text or use the phone while operating the vehicle. If you need to use the phone, use a hands -free device but never attempt to text message while driving. • Obey the posted speed limits at all times to ensure safety and always plan ahead for a long trip.

Fire & Safety Defined • State law prohibits the possession of any explosive, firearm,

Fire & Safety Defined • State law prohibits the possession of any explosive, firearm, imitation firearm, fireworks, ammunition or hazardous chemicals on University property.

Fire & Safety Facts • Since 2000, 146 people have been killed in campusrelated

Fire & Safety Facts • Since 2000, 146 people have been killed in campusrelated fires. • In more than half of these cases, consumption of alcohol was a contributing factor. • UT Arlington has experienced nine (9) on-campus fires in the past three (3) years, causing thousands of dollars in damage. [www. campus-firewatch. com]

Fire & Safety Policy • It is the policy of The University of Texas

Fire & Safety Policy • It is the policy of The University of Texas at Arlington to provide the safest possible environment for our students, faculty, staff and visitors. Each member of our academic community is urged to accept the challenge of maintaining an accident-free environment. • Tampering with or destroying fire safety equipment can lead to possible sanctions from law enforcement authorities and the Office of Student Conduct. In the event that there is an injury or death, there can also be criminal and civil charges filed against you and/or your organization.

Fire & Safety Managing the Risks • Event space – Make sure the venue

Fire & Safety Managing the Risks • Event space – Make sure the venue is large enough to handle the expected attendance. • • • Do not block/obstruct entrances & exits No candles or incense Grilling – Self-starting/matchless charcoal ONLY – Lighter fluid is prohibited – Cannot provide your own propane. Contact Environmental Health & Safety to borrow a free propane tank. – Do not grill within 10 feet of a walkway, balcony, canopy, or overhang. – Distinguish coals immediately with water. • • No theatrical smoke or hazers Model Rockets – For use, please contact Environmental Health & Safety

Fire & Safety Managing the Risks • Be careful with extension cords & power

Fire & Safety Managing the Risks • Be careful with extension cords & power strips – – Tape down to prevent tripping Don’t overload circuits Don’t use damaged cords Always use a surge protector • NEVER IGNORE A FIRE ALARM – “Oh it’s just another drill”. • If you suspect or know of anyone who may be in possession of any illegal weapons on campus, please report it immediately to UTA Police at 817 -272 -3381 or call 911.

Behavior • YOU represent: – Your student organization – UT Arlington • Negative actions

Behavior • YOU represent: – Your student organization – UT Arlington • Negative actions like fighting, vandalism, arrests, etc. will invariably reflect poorly on your record as well as possibly tarnishing the reputation of your organization.

Behavior Policy • As a UT Arlington student and member of a student organization,

Behavior Policy • As a UT Arlington student and member of a student organization, you are expected to abide by the provisions set forth in the Regents’ Rules and Regulations. Some of the prohibited behaviors that can be sanctioned include disorderly conduct, misrepresentation of self, destruction of University property and other violations of the Handbook of Operating Procedures. http: //www. uta. edu/policy/hop • UT Arlington may impose University sanctions for inappropriate behaviors occurring off campus.

Behavior Managing the Risks • Abide by all University policies. • Act responsibly and

Behavior Managing the Risks • Abide by all University policies. • Act responsibly and respectfully. • Remember that your organization can place sanctions on you in cases where behavior has become an issue.

More Information For questions, more information, or to create your organization’s own Risk Management

More Information For questions, more information, or to create your organization’s own Risk Management Plan, please contact the Office of Student Governance & Organizations at (817) 272 -2293 or at [email protected] edu

References • Allan, E. J. , & Maddan, M. (2008). Hazing in view: college

References • Allan, E. J. , & Maddan, M. (2008). Hazing in view: college students at risk. National Study of Student Hazing, Retrieved from http: //www. hazingstudy. org/publications/hazing_in_view_web. pdf • Engs RC, Diebold BA, Hansen DJ. The drinking patterns and problems of a national sample of college students, 1994. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 41(3): 13 -33, 1996. • Fisher, B. S. , Cullen, F. T. , & Turner, M. G. U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women (NCJ 182369). Washington DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. • Hingson, R. et al. Magnitude of Alcohol-Related Mortality and Morbidity Among U. S. College Students Ages 18 -24: Changes from 1998 to 2001. Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 26, 259 -79; 2005 • Hingson RW, Howland J. Comprehensive community interventions to promote health: Implications for college-age drinking problems. Journal of Studies on Alcohol Supplement 14: 226 -240, 2002. • NHTSA’s National Center for Statistics and Analysis, (2009). Fatal crashes involving young drivers. Traffic Safety Facts, Retrieved from http: //wwwnrd. nhtsa. dot. gov/Pubs/811218. pdf • Presley CA, Meilman PW, Cashin JR. Alcohol and Drugs on American College Campuses: Use, Consequences, and Perceptions of the Campus Environment, Vol. IV: 1992 -1994. Carbondale, IL: Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, 1996 a.

References • Presley CA, Meilman PW, Cashin JR, Lyerla R. Alcohol and Drugs on

References • Presley CA, Meilman PW, Cashin JR, Lyerla R. Alcohol and Drugs on American College Campuses: Use, Consequences, and Perceptions of the Campus Environment, Vol. III: 1991 -1993. Carbondale, IL: Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, 1996 b. • Rand, M. R. U. S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. (2009). Criminal victimization (NCJ 227777). Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics • U. S. Department of Justice. 2005 National Crime Victimization Study. 2005. • Wechsler H, Kuo M, Lee H, Dowdall GW. Environmental correlates of underage alcohol use and related problems of college students. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 19(1): 24 -29, 2000 a.

Conclusion Thank you for participating in this session! We want your involvement in co-curricular

Conclusion Thank you for participating in this session! We want your involvement in co-curricular life to be safe and successful for you and your organization. For more information on resources or if you have questions about any part of this presentation, please do not hesitate to contact: Student Governance & Organizations at 817 -272 -2293 or [email protected] edu