Strengthen your Core Posture Back Health Balance 2008

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Strengthen your Core: Posture, Back Health & Balance © 2008 The Regents of the

Strengthen your Core: Posture, Back Health & Balance © 2008 The Regents of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

What is your Core?

What is your Core?

What is your Core?

What is your Core?

Why should I strengthen my core? Everyday acts. Bending to put on shoes or

Why should I strengthen my core? Everyday acts. Bending to put on shoes or scoop up a package, turning to look behind you, sitting in a chair, or simply standing still — these are just a few of the many mundane actions that rely on your core and that you might notice until they become difficult or painful. Even basic activities of daily living — bathing or dressing, for example — call on your core. On-the-job tasks. Jobs that involve lifting, twisting, and standing all rely on core muscles. But less obvious tasks — like sitting at your desk for hours — engage your core as well. Phone calls, typing, computer use, and similar work can make back muscles surprisingly stiff and sore, particularly if you're not strong enough to practice good posture and aren't taking sufficient breaks. A healthy back. Low back pain — a debilitating, sometimes excruciating problem affecting four out of five Americans at some point in their lives — may be prevented by exercises that promote well-balanced, resilient core muscles. When back pain strikes, a regimen of core exercises is often prescribed to relieve it, coupled with medications, physical therapy, or other treatments if necessary.

Why should I strengthen my core? Sports and other pleasurable activities. Golfing, tennis or

Why should I strengthen my core? Sports and other pleasurable activities. Golfing, tennis or other racquet sports, biking, running, swimming, baseball, volleyball, kayaking, rowing and many other athletic activities are powered by a strong core. Less often mentioned are sexual activities, which call for core power and flexibility, too. Housework, fix-it work, and gardening. Bending, lifting, twisting, carrying, hammering, reaching overhead — even vacuuming, mopping, and dusting are acts that spring from, or pass through, the core. Balance and stability. Your core stabilizes your body, allowing you to move in any direction, even on the bumpiest terrain, or stand in one spot without losing your balance. Viewed this way, core exercises can lessen your risk of falling. Good posture. Weak core muscles contribute to slouching. Good posture trims your silhouette and projects confidence. More importantly, it lessens wear and tear on the spine and allows you to breathe deeply. Good posture helps you gain full benefits from the effort you put into exercising, too.

Why should I strengthen my body? • Over the age of 50, strength training

Why should I strengthen my body? • Over the age of 50, strength training becomes as necessary for good health as aerobic exercise • Prevention of falls • To ward of diabetes • Maintenance of weight and bone density • Increased cognitive function, delay onset of dimentia • Delay disability and maintain independence

Balance (neuromotor training)? Neuromotor exercise (sometimes called “functional fitness training”) is recommended for two

Balance (neuromotor training)? Neuromotor exercise (sometimes called “functional fitness training”) is recommended for two or three days per week. Exercises should involve motor skills (balance, agility, coordination and gait), proprioceptive exercise training and multifaceted activities (tai ji and yoga) to improve physical function and prevent falls in older adults. 20 -30 minutes per day is appropriate for neuromotor exercise

Rate of Nonfatal, Medically Consulted Fall Injury Episodes, by Age Group Data & Statistics

Rate of Nonfatal, Medically Consulted Fall Injury Episodes, by Age Group Data & Statistics Rate of Nonfatal, Medically Consulted Fall Injury Episodes, by Age Group In 2010, the overall rate of nonfatal fall injury episodes for which a health-care professional was contacted was 43 per 1, 000 population. Persons aged ≥ 75 years had the highest rate (115). Graphic source: MMWR Quickstats, 02/03/2012

Good posture & better body alignment

Good posture & better body alignment

Posture Tips: • DO: Stand tall and erect Keep chin tucked in Keep head

Posture Tips: • DO: Stand tall and erect Keep chin tucked in Keep head and shoulders in alignment Check posture regularly in a mirror or large window Pull head back against headrest in car seat • DON’T: Slouch or slump while watching TV or reading Sit, stand or lie in one position for too long ***Believe you are too bent out of shape to change – it can be done with practice and a little more effort!

Good posture & better body alignment • Perform postural correction exercises several times daily

Good posture & better body alignment • Perform postural correction exercises several times daily to attain and maintain better body alignment • You can combine 2 -3 exercises at one time; for example, Bucket, Show-off and Think taller • Practice exercises anytime, anywhere, e. g. standing in line at the supermarket, after brushing your teeth or combing your hair, while talking on the telephone. • Use good posture when both seated and standing (reading, driving, waiting in line, etc. )

Body Mechancis Tips: § Good body mechanics are important during activities of daily living.

Body Mechancis Tips: § Good body mechanics are important during activities of daily living. § The practice of good body mechanics will: -help distribute weight throughout the skeleton in a more anatomically correct manner thus stimulating more normal forces on the bones, and encouraging stronger, healthier, denser bones. -reduce unnatural forces on bones, ligaments, joints and muscles and reduce risk of fracture, other injury or back pain.

 A good motto is: Sit less, stand more, and, when you can’t do

A good motto is: Sit less, stand more, and, when you can’t do that, lie down on your back and exercise to strengthen it.