Story Writing Objectives To think about story writing

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Story Writing

Story Writing

Objectives: • • • To think about story writing To talk about the important

Objectives: • • • To think about story writing To talk about the important parts of a story To think about settings and characters in stories To think about story plans-openings, events and resolutions To draft a story - thinking about characters – settings - events and resolutions.

Settings for stories • What is a setting? A setting is where a story

Settings for stories • What is a setting? A setting is where a story takes place. Last time we looked at these kinds of settings.

Characters…… Two or three characters are usually enough for a short story. Here's how

Characters…… Two or three characters are usually enough for a short story. Here's how to make the characters sound real: Give them suitable names. For example: Pirates: Captain Peg-Leg, Scarfaced Bill, Sly Sam, One-eyed Pete Astronauts: Commander Ben Lewis, Assistant Commander Buzz Owens, Captain Tilly Jones Describe what they look like and how they move. For example: A wizened old man shuffling about the house in slippers. A giant, hairy, orange caterpillar creeping slowly along. A ten year old girl, rather small for her age, skipped merrily along the street, her long fair hair flying in the wind. Try to show they feel using adjectives and adverbs, for example: tired, excitedly, grateful, angrily, happy, sadly, curious, worriedly, relieved, nervously

Characters: Look carefully at these characters. Can you write a short description of 2

Characters: Look carefully at these characters. Can you write a short description of 2 of them.

How do I start a good story? There are three different ways to start

How do I start a good story? There are three different ways to start a story: Dialogue: "Sharks!" shouted the ship's look out, "hundreds of them!" "They seem to be heading our way, " cried the Captain. Action: An ear splitting whistle made all the pirates leap to attention. At once they ran in different directions, bumping into one another, scrambling over untidy piles of ropes and tarpaulin, sliding down rickety ladders, all trying to be the first in the queue for lunch. Description: The sea glistened like a sparkling, silver mirror. Waves lapped gently at the sides of the Saucy Sue as she sailed silently along in the cool, refreshing breeze, her Jolly Roger flag fluttering limply. Seagulls circled overhead, calling to each other. No-one would guess what terrible adventure lay ahead for Captain Peg-Leg and his crew of daring pirates.

Writing a good story These question words are important when writing stories. • who,

Writing a good story These question words are important when writing stories. • who, what, how, where, when, and why • The tiny bird hopped quickly across the garden, picked up the bread, and immediately flew off to a safe place to eat it. Now you try with these pictures:

Use these ways to improve your writing! • Alliteration (words starting with the same

Use these ways to improve your writing! • Alliteration (words starting with the same letter) - e. g. dark, dank, dreary forest; • crowded, cobbled streets • Rhyme - e. g. hustle and bustle; a rumbling and a tumbling • Patterning - e. g. in the highest branches of the furthest tree; travelling faster and faster • Onomatopoeia (words that sound like thing they describe)- e. g. jingling, jangling, tinkling coins. • Similes compare one thing to another and are introduced by the words 'like' or 'as', e. g. The wet mud was sticky like fudge cake. • Metaphors compare one thing with another, but are not introduced by 'like' or 'as', e. g. The wet mud was sticky fudge cake. • Similes : • The moon hung in the sky like it was on an invisible thread. • The storm was as violent as a ranting bull. • The wind was like a roaring lion shaking its mane. • To change the similes to metaphors, take out the words as and like: • The moon hung in the sky on an invisible thread. • The storm was a ranting bull. • The wind was a roaring lion shaking its mane.

What should I include in a good story? Events • An interesting story will

What should I include in a good story? Events • An interesting story will contain several events. • A strong exciting plot has an unexpected event, a crisis, or a problem, which needs to be sorted out by the end of a story. Stories can contain more than one problem. Plans could go wrong: • There could be an accident. • Someone or something could get lost. • A machine could break down. • Something important could get stolen.

Story endings Explain the result of the events or show the problem was solved.

Story endings Explain the result of the events or show the problem was solved. (But don't end with everyone going home for tea or someone waking up to find it was all a dream - that's boring!) Endings usually bring the story round 'full circle'. For example, Start: Three scruffy pirates sat gloomily around a table in the Lord Nelson pub, staring down in to their empty beer glasses. One by one they emptied out their pockets. It seemed they had all run out of money. Ending: The pirate gang made their way down the quay to their favourite pub to celebrate their success. They had earned enough money now to buy a year's worth of beer - and have change.

Story endings The final sentence is as important as the opening sentence. It usually

Story endings The final sentence is as important as the opening sentence. It usually sums up the story's theme or message. • It had been the best day of my life. • I'll never forget her. • If only he hadn't been so selfish. • She realised taking part is much more important than winning. • It just goes to show, crime really doesn't pay. • They were richer than they could ever have dreamed.

Storyboards What are storyboards? Story boards help you to plan a story without writing

Storyboards What are storyboards? Story boards help you to plan a story without writing it all out. Opening? Setting? Characters? Problem…. How it is solved… Ending….

Now you are going to plan a great story. • • Checklist: Title- think

Now you are going to plan a great story. • • Checklist: Title- think of a great title for your story. Setting- where will the story take place? Characters- who will be in the story? What problem will they have? How will they solve the problem? How will the story end?

Task 1 • • • To plan your story thinking of all the key

Task 1 • • • To plan your story thinking of all the key points using the story mountain plan template or story planner (which ever is suitable) To then choose a template to start writing out your story writing template To draw a scene from your story (in the box on the story writing template) To title the story (and write it at the top of the story writing template) Have fun! Or Task 2 (see next slide)

Task 2 • Complete the ‘stretch a sentence activity’ • Look at the ‘stretch

Task 2 • Complete the ‘stretch a sentence activity’ • Look at the ‘stretch a sentence example’ • Then write your own detailed sentence including a who, what, where, when and why? • And write your own on the ‘stretch a sentence sheet’ referring back to the example. • Have fun!