SPP Mission Helping our members work together to

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SPP Mission Helping our members work together to keep the lights on – today

SPP Mission Helping our members work together to keep the lights on – today and in the future. Updated 8 -24 -2010 SPP. org 1

Presentation Before the NMPRC Staff September 1, 2010 Les Dillahunty Senior Vice President, Engineering

Presentation Before the NMPRC Staff September 1, 2010 Les Dillahunty Senior Vice President, Engineering and Regulatory Policy Lanny Nickell Vice President, Operations Pat Bourne Director, Transmission Policy Heather Starnes Manager, Regulatory Policy SPP. org

Our Beginning • Founded 1941 with 11 members Ø Utilities pooled resources to keep

Our Beginning • Founded 1941 with 11 members Ø Utilities pooled resources to keep Arkansas aluminum plant powered for critical defense • Maintained after WWII for reliability and coordination SPP. org 3

SPP Milestones 1968 NERC Regional Council 1980 Telecommunications network 1991 Operating reserve sharing 1994

SPP Milestones 1968 NERC Regional Council 1980 Telecommunications network 1991 Operating reserve sharing 1994 Incorporated as non-profit 1997 Reliability coordination 1998 Tariff administration 2001 Regional scheduling 2004 FERC-approved Regional Transmission Organization 2006 Contract Services 2007 Launched EIS market, NERC Regional Entity 2009 2010 Nebraska utilities integrated FERC approves Highway/Byway cost allocation methodology and Integrated Transmission Planning Process SPP. org 4

The SPP Difference • Relationship - Based • Member - Driven • Independence Through

The SPP Difference • Relationship - Based • Member - Driven • Independence Through Diversity • Evolutionary vs. Revolutionary • Reliability and Economics Inseparable SPP. org 5

SPP at a Glance • Little Rock based • Approx. 450 employees • $127

SPP at a Glance • Little Rock based • Approx. 450 employees • $127 million operating budget (2010) • 24 x 7 operation • Full redundancy and backup site SPP. org 6

60 SPP Members SPP. org 7

60 SPP Members SPP. org 7

Members in nine states: Arkansas Mississippi New Mexico Kansas Missouri Oklahoma Louisiana Nebraska Texas

Members in nine states: Arkansas Mississippi New Mexico Kansas Missouri Oklahoma Louisiana Nebraska Texas SPP. org 8

Operating Region • 370, 000 square miles service territory • 847 generating plants •

Operating Region • 370, 000 square miles service territory • 847 generating plants • 6, 079 substations • 50, 575 miles transmission: 69 k. V – 16, 182 miles 115 k. V – 10, 041 miles 138 k. V – 9, 284 miles 161 k. V – 4, 469 miles 230 k. V – 3, 831 miles 345 k. V – 6, 662 miles 500 k. V – 106 miles SPP. org 9

Operating Region - 2009 • 49, 275 MW peak demand • 196, 301 GWh

Operating Region - 2009 • 49, 275 MW peak demand • 196, 301 GWh energy consumption • 1, 500 MW wholesale demand response • 419 MW retail demand response • 66, 175 megawatts generating capacity: SPP. org 10

SPP Expenses: 2001 -2010 $/Mwh based on 12 CP Method SPP. org 11

SPP Expenses: 2001 -2010 $/Mwh based on 12 CP Method SPP. org 11

Regulatory Environment • Incorporated in Arkansas as a 501(c)(6) non-profit corporation • FERC -

Regulatory Environment • Incorporated in Arkansas as a 501(c)(6) non-profit corporation • FERC - Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Ø Regulated public utility Ø Regional Transmission Organization • NERC - North American Electric Reliability Corporation Ø Founding member Ø Regional Entity SPP. org 12

3 Electric Interconnections / 8 NERC Regions SPP. org 13

3 Electric Interconnections / 8 NERC Regions SPP. org 13

Independent System Operator (ISO) / Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) Map SPP. org 14

Independent System Operator (ISO) / Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) Map SPP. org 14

Interregional Coordination • ISO-RTO Council • Interregional Planning • North American Energy Standards Board

Interregional Coordination • ISO-RTO Council • Interregional Planning • North American Energy Standards Board • National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners SPP. org 15

Our Major Services • Facilitation Key Elements of Services • Reliability Coordination Regional •

Our Major Services • Facilitation Key Elements of Services • Reliability Coordination Regional • Tariff Administration • Market Operation Independent Cost-Effective Focus on Reliability • Standards Setting • Compliance Enforcement • Transmission Planning SPP. org 16

Facilitation – Helping our members work together SPP. org 17

Facilitation – Helping our members work together SPP. org 17

Reliability Coordination • Monitor grid 24 x 365 As “Air Traffic Controllers, ” our

Reliability Coordination • Monitor grid 24 x 365 As “Air Traffic Controllers, ” our operators comply with… • Anticipate problems • Take preemptive action • Coordinate regional response …over 1, 300 pages of reliability standards and criteria. • Independent • NERC Required SPP. org 18

Compliance Enforcement and Standards Setting • The SPP Regional Entity enforces compliance with federal

Compliance Enforcement and Standards Setting • The SPP Regional Entity enforces compliance with federal NERC reliability standards • Creates regional reliability standards with stakeholder input • Provides training and education to users, owners, and operators of bulk power grid SPP. org 19

Training • World class regional restoration drills • NERC certifications • Train-the-trainer workshops •

Training • World class regional restoration drills • NERC certifications • Train-the-trainer workshops • 2009 training program awarded ~17, 000 continuing education hours to 444 operators from 30 member organizations SPP. org 20

What kind of markets does SPP have now? • Transmission: Participants buy and sell

What kind of markets does SPP have now? • Transmission: Participants buy and sell use of regional transmission lines that are owned by different parties • Energy Imbalance Service (EIS): Participants buy and sell wholesale electricity in real-time Ø Market uses least expensive energy from regional resources to serve demand (load) first Ø Sometimes it’s less expensive for a market participant to purchase power from another provider than to generate Ø SPP monitors resource/load balance to ensure system reliability SPP. org 21

Transmission Service As “Sales Agents, ” we administer … • Provides “one-stop shopping” for

Transmission Service As “Sales Agents, ” we administer … • Provides “one-stop shopping” for use of regional transmission lines • Consistent rates, terms, conditions • Independent • Process > 8, 600 transactions/month • 2009 transmission market transactions = $486 million …a 1, 900+ page transmission tariff on behalf of our members and customers. SPP. org 22

Transmission Service SPP. org 23

Transmission Service SPP. org 23

Transmission Service SPP. org 24

Transmission Service SPP. org 24

Market Operation SPP’s energy market is like the “NYSE”… • Monitors supply/demand balance •

Market Operation SPP’s energy market is like the “NYSE”… • Monitors supply/demand balance • Ensures economic dispatch while meeting system reliability • Provides settlement data …and follows over 200 pages of market protocols. • 32 participants • 2009 wholesale market transactions = $1. 14 billion SPP. org 25

Benefits of current real-time energy market SPP. org 26

Benefits of current real-time energy market SPP. org 26

Why develop new markets? • SPP conducts complex cost-benefit studies before beginning any new

Why develop new markets? • SPP conducts complex cost-benefit studies before beginning any new market development Ø Under Regional State Committee oversight Ø 2005 Charles River Associates analysis of the EIS market: • 1. Estimated benefit of $86 million for first year 2. Actual benefit of $103 million for first year New markets will bring estimated average additional net benefits of $100 million Ø According to 2009 Ventyx analysis SPP. org 27

What type of new markets is SPP implementing? • Day Ahead: SPP determines what

What type of new markets is SPP implementing? • Day Ahead: SPP determines what generating units should run the next day for maximum cost-effectiveness • Ancillary Services: Market to buy and sell reserve energy that: Ø Meets emergency needs Ø Regulates instantaneous load and generation changes Ø Maintain electricity quality (keeping voltage up, etc. ) SPP. org 28

Day Ahead market makes regional generation choices SPP. org 29

Day Ahead market makes regional generation choices SPP. org 29

Day Ahead market offers regional diversity SPP. org 30

Day Ahead market offers regional diversity SPP. org 30

Benefits of Ancillary Service market • Greater access to reserve electricity • Improve regional

Benefits of Ancillary Service market • Greater access to reserve electricity • Improve regional balancing of supply and demand • Facilitate integration of renewable resources SPP. org 31

SPP will balance load/supply for region SPP. org 32

SPP will balance load/supply for region SPP. org 32

SPP will balance load/supply for region (cont’d) SPP’s Consolidated Balancing Authority will consolidate the

SPP will balance load/supply for region (cont’d) SPP’s Consolidated Balancing Authority will consolidate the balancing authority functions of 15 existing balancing areas SPP. org 33

Why Is More Transmission Needed? • 7% of our total infrastructure asset base (transmission)

Why Is More Transmission Needed? • 7% of our total infrastructure asset base (transmission) is constraining 93% (generation and distribution) • Strategic transmission expansion allows us to: • Ø Move output of capital-intensive generation to where it’s needed Ø Make the best use of our regional differences and diverse generating resources Electric grid is in use every second: benefits of added transmission aren’t just long-term, but instantaneous SPP. org 34

What is congestion? • Congestion or “bottlenecks” happen when you can’t get energy to

What is congestion? • Congestion or “bottlenecks” happen when you can’t get energy to customers along a certain path Ø • • Desired electricity flows exceed physical capability Congestion caused by: Ø Lack of transmission, often due to load growth Ø Line and generator maintenance outages Ø Unplanned outages such as storms or trees on lines Ø Too much generation pushed to grid in a particular location Ø Preferred energy source located far from customers Results in inability to use least-cost electricity to meet demand SPP. org 35

Congestion prevents access to lower-cost generation SPP. org 36

Congestion prevents access to lower-cost generation SPP. org 36

Congestion’s Impact on Wholesale Market Prices SPP. org 37

Congestion’s Impact on Wholesale Market Prices SPP. org 37

Integrated Transmission Planning • Goal: Design transmission backbone to connect load to most reasonable

Integrated Transmission Planning • Goal: Design transmission backbone to connect load to most reasonable generation alternatives Ø Strengthen ties to Eastern and Western Interconnections Ø Improve connections between SPP’s east and west regions • Horizons: 20, 10, and 4 year • Focus: Regional, integrated with local • Resulting in: Comprehensive list of needed projects for SPP region over next 20 years Ø With 40 year financial/economic analysis • Underlying Value: Reliability and Economics are inseparable SPP. org 38

Transmission Planning • Generation Interconnection Studies Ø Determines what transmission is needed to connect

Transmission Planning • Generation Interconnection Studies Ø Determines what transmission is needed to connect new generation to grid Ø Doesn’t include transmission service • Aggregate Studies Ø Determines what transmission is needed to meet requests for transmission service Ø Shares costs of studies and new transmission SPP. org 39

Projects with Notifications to Construct SPP. org 40

Projects with Notifications to Construct SPP. org 40

Inter-Regional Plans SPP. org 41

Inter-Regional Plans SPP. org 41

Regional State Committee • Retail regulatory commissioners: Arkansas Missouri Oklahoma Kansas Nebraska Texas Mississippi

Regional State Committee • Retail regulatory commissioners: Arkansas Missouri Oklahoma Kansas Nebraska Texas Mississippi New Mexico Louisiana maintains active observer status • Functions Ø Cost allocation Ø Ensure adequate supply Ø Market cost/benefit analyses SPP. org 42

Who pays for transmission? Sponsored Highway/ Byway Postage Stamp Directly assigned w/ revenue credits

Who pays for transmission? Sponsored Highway/ Byway Postage Stamp Directly assigned w/ revenue credits Postage Stamp Reason Criteria or Designated Resource Benefits / Cost ≥ 1 Sponsor(s) nominate projects EHV projects from ITP Voltage Transmission 345 k. V and above Effective 2005 2008 2009 6/19/2010 Reliability Economic “Base Plan Funding” “Balanced Portfolio” Funded 33% / 67% Type Highway/Byway Voltage Paid for by Region Paid for by Local Zone 300 k. V and above 100% 0% above 100 k. V and below 300 k. V 33% 67% 100 k. V and below 0% 100% SPP. org 43

Wind Energy Development • Wind “Saudi Arabia”: Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas Panhandle, New Mexico, Nebraska

Wind Energy Development • Wind “Saudi Arabia”: Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas Panhandle, New Mexico, Nebraska Ø 60, 000 -90, 000 MW potential Ø More wind energy than SPP uses during peak demand • ~3, 400 MW capacity of in-service wind • ~30, 000 MW wind in-service and being developed Ø Includes wind in Generation Interconnection queue and with executed Interconnection Agreements SPP. org 44

Wind In Service SPP. org 45

Wind In Service SPP. org 45

Generation Interconnection Requests SPP. org 46

Generation Interconnection Requests SPP. org 46

SPP Strategically SPP. org 47

SPP Strategically SPP. org 47

Questions Raised by NMPRC Staff SPP. org 48

Questions Raised by NMPRC Staff SPP. org 48

Obligation to Serve Load (Management of Unexpected Load Growth) • SPP has an obligation

Obligation to Serve Load (Management of Unexpected Load Growth) • SPP has an obligation to serve all load and load growth under network service • SPP has a larger geographic scope of operation than a single company and therefore provides more service options to members needing additional load SPP. org 49

Facilitation of Changing Needs • If load increase arises in an unexpected way, mitigation

Facilitation of Changing Needs • If load increase arises in an unexpected way, mitigation plans may be required until improvements can be installed. These mitigations are often operational in nature • SPP Operations has daily real time monitoring processes to ensure the security of the grid. • The market dispatches generation recognizing congestion and reliability constraints SPP. org 50

Unexpected Changes in Forecasted Load • If there are changes in real-time, SPP will

Unexpected Changes in Forecasted Load • If there are changes in real-time, SPP will work to reliably serve the load • If there unexpected changes with a short lead time, the member should contact SPP as soon as the problem is anticipated and SPP will provide service • Unexpected changes with a longer lead time will be accommodated through the planning process SPP. org 51

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff For each calendar year, the Transmission Provider shall

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff For each calendar year, the Transmission Provider shall establish a rate for this administrative charge by dividing projected expenses based on its budget for the calendar year by the projected billing units for the calendar year. The Transmission Provider shall reconcile actual to budget figures and shall adjust charges for the following calendar year to reflect over or under recoveries of its costs for the prior year. SPP. org 52

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff • Service for Point to Point Transmission is

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff • Service for Point to Point Transmission is billed at the rate of $0. 195 per MW hour • Network Transmission Service is billed at the rate of $0. 195 per MW hour based on the Member or Customer’s prior calendar year average monthly coincident peak load • SPP Members are billed at the rate of $0. 195 per MW hour for all load they service within SPP but not with SPP Transmission Service SPP. org 53

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff currently provides for: Ø 100% recovery of SPP’s

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff currently provides for: Ø 100% recovery of SPP’s costs Ø True-up of prior year over/under recovery Ø Annual rate setting Ø A cap of 22. 5 cents/MWh SPP. org 54

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff Formula For Calculation: Operating Expense Plus: Interest Expense

Schedule 1 A of SPP Tariff Formula For Calculation: Operating Expense Plus: Interest Expense Scheduled Principal Payments Less: Depreciation Other Revenues (ICT, NERC, Sch 12) Equals: Net Revenue Requiremend Divided: Estimated Load (MWhs) Equals: Rate +/- true-up SPP. org 55

Historical Admin Fee and Costs SPP. org 56

Historical Admin Fee and Costs SPP. org 56

Value of SPP Services • Services where value can be estimated: Ø EIS Market

Value of SPP Services • Services where value can be estimated: Ø EIS Market – regional benefit of $100 MM/year Ø Total Schedule 1 A costs well below benefit for each year of EIS operation • Services which are difficult to value: Ø Regional reliability coordination Ø One stop shopping for transmission service Ø Region-wide transmission planning SPP. org 57

Value of SPP Services • Services to be implemented / developed Ø Future Markets

Value of SPP Services • Services to be implemented / developed Ø Future Markets – expected net regional benefits of $100 MM/year Ø ITP – construction of transmission w/ certainty of recovery through accepted cost allocation methodology Ø Consolidated Balancing Areas – centralized service resulting in operating efficiencies and cost efficiencies SPP. org 58

Benefits of SPP Membership • Revenue distributions under SPP Tariff • Administration of transmission

Benefits of SPP Membership • Revenue distributions under SPP Tariff • Administration of transmission services, including generation interconnection service • Market participation • Reserve sharing for LCEC resources • Application of the SPP transmission planning and expansion process to the LCEC system SPP. org 59