Skills For Life Module 7 Scouting for all

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#Skills. For. Life

#Skills. For. Life

Module 7 Scouting for all How and where to find information to help you

Module 7 Scouting for all How and where to find information to help you provide Scouting for all. How to make changes to make Scouts more inclusive.

Module 7 • • • Equality Diversity Inclusion Human and youth rights Scout values

Module 7 • • • Equality Diversity Inclusion Human and youth rights Scout values

Equality is about: • Provisioning (what people have access to) and consideration for all

Equality is about: • Provisioning (what people have access to) and consideration for all people • Freedom from harassment • Zero bullying • Removal of all forms of discrimination • Fairness and equal treatment of all - this doesn’t always mean treating everyone in exactly the same way

Diversity means: • Scouts across all areas of the community • Celebrating the past

Diversity means: • Scouts across all areas of the community • Celebrating the past and present of our diverse backgrounds • Recognising and embracing the differences between us

Inclusion means: • All people are enabled to participate fully • Equal community representation

Inclusion means: • All people are enabled to participate fully • Equal community representation in all areas of Scouts • Recruitment of young people and adult volunteers in all areas of the community, including currently under-represented areas • Removing barriers to people taking part in Scouts • Fairness in awards, badges and event selection processes.

Protected characteristics Some areas of inclusion are also known as ‘protected characteristics’. These are

Protected characteristics Some areas of inclusion are also known as ‘protected characteristics’. These are aspects of people’s identities that are protected by law. They include: • • • Age Disability Gender reassignment Marriage and civil partnership Pregnancy and maternity Race Religion or belief Sexual Orientation

UK Legal requirements: UK Equality Act 2010 Gender Recognition Act 2004/2019 UN Universal Declaration

UK Legal requirements: UK Equality Act 2010 Gender Recognition Act 2004/2019 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948 UN Convention of the Rights of the Child 1990 UN Convention the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2007 European Convention on Human Rights UK Scout Association Policies

Equal Opportunities Policy In Scouts we have an Equal Opportunities Policy to protect both

Equal Opportunities Policy In Scouts we have an Equal Opportunities Policy to protect both adult volunteers and young people. This can be found in the following places: POR: Rule 2. 1 The Religious Policy Rule 2. 2 The Equal Opportunities Policy Online: https: //scouts. org. uk/about-us/key-policies/equal-opportunitiespolicy/

Scouting history Scouts history First National Leadership team to look at inclusion? 1936. National

Scouting history Scouts history First National Leadership team to look at inclusion? 1936. National Committee for looking at inclusion. Scouts refugee response project started in which year? 1938. First recorded reasonable adjustment? 1914. This was for a ‘meccanno' semaphore tower so a Scout with a limb missing could participate in an activity after returning to Scouts after the First World War. First Sikh Scout Group? 13 February 1998. The 13 th Southall in London.

Scouting history First girls in Scouts? 'I think girls can get just as much

Scouting history First girls in Scouts? 'I think girls can get just as much healthy fun and as much value out of Scouting as boys can. Some who have taken it up have proved themselves good souls in a very short time. As to pluck, women and girls can be just as brave as men and have over and over again proved it in times of danger. But for some reason it is not expected of them and consequentially it is seldom made part of their education, although it ought to be; for courage is not always born in people, but can generally be made by instruction. ' Robert Baden-Powell, The Scout, May 1908 First inclusive national event? 1982 Extoree.

Understanding inclusion We all have different aspects to our identity e. g. race, sex,

Understanding inclusion We all have different aspects to our identity e. g. race, sex, nationality. When these overlap they can leave individuals open to a combination of multiple forms of discrimination. This is called intersectionality. Privilege is a right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person, community or group which isn't always available to others.

How to be more inclusive • Be proactive in showing that your group is

How to be more inclusive • Be proactive in showing that your group is open to all • Get to know young people, parents/carers and other volunteers as soon as they join • Ask members open questions so that they can let you know any adjustments they need • Challenge unacceptable language and behavior • Make use of local expert charities, online guidance, resources and support

Faith/no faith Scouts welcomes people all faiths and none. • • Multiple versions of

Faith/no faith Scouts welcomes people all faiths and none. • • Multiple versions of the Scout Promise. Faith discussion badges, inter-faith projects and events. Celebration of different faith’s key calendar dates. Discussion of all beliefs, including no-faith, atheist or humanist views.

How to be more inclusive • Look at whether dates and venues of your

How to be more inclusive • Look at whether dates and venues of your meetings or events are inclusive for people of all faiths and none • Ask open questions to all members about whether they have any faith or cultural requirements. This might include; dietary needs, changes to activities or uniform, key religious dates/festivals, time/space to pray or reflect, fasting days, communications • Listen and make adjustments consistently. Don’t make assumptions! Let members guide you. • Think about simple changes that can be made for everyone e. g. a quiet space for all spiritual reflection, one meal/snack that works for everyone, avoiding meeting on certain dates or days of the week

Socio-economic background Young people and volunteers will come from different socio-economic backgrounds, and financial

Socio-economic background Young people and volunteers will come from different socio-economic backgrounds, and financial barriers could affect them joining or participating in Scouts fully. To be inclusive and accessible to all, we should remove as many costs as possible so everyone can participate equally.

How to be more inclusive • Offer a wide range of core activities without

How to be more inclusive • Offer a wide range of core activities without cost • Give advance notice of any activities with costs attached • Don’t ask for big amounts of money in one go (including from volunteers) • Find ways to subsidise activities and events e. g. local funds or grants • Provide friendly, open ways for all parents/carers, or young people, to talk to you about costs – don’t single people out • Involve parents/carers in planning so you can spot costs and adjust activities for all

Mental Health Mental health is a person's current condition of psychological wellbeing (the way

Mental Health Mental health is a person's current condition of psychological wellbeing (the way we think and feel). We all have mental health, and this will vary over time, much like we all have variable levels of physical health. When we experience poor mental health, it can make the way we think, feel or react difficult, or even impossible, to cope with.

How to be more inclusive • Promote good mental health through programme activities •

How to be more inclusive • Promote good mental health through programme activities • Avoid language that trivialises mental health e. g. ‘pull yourself together’ • Learn to spot common signs of poor mental health at Scouting for All • Remember you don’t need all the answers – listen and be empathetic • Ask what you can do to make the member feel welcome, happy and safe at Scouts – you could record this in a care/support plan. • Know when and where to find outside support or advice – Scouting for All, Info Centre, Safeguarding and mental health charities e. g. Young. Minds or local Minds

Disability & additional needs Disabilities and additional needs can be visible or invisible, long-term,

Disability & additional needs Disabilities and additional needs can be visible or invisible, long-term, progressive or temporary, physical, sensory, learning, mental or cognitive. All disabilities and additional needs are individual. To make sure all young people have equal access to experiences, activities and skills for life, irrespective of disability or additional needs, we make reasonable adjustments.

How to be more inclusive • Talk to parents/carers and young people about additional

How to be more inclusive • Talk to parents/carers and young people about additional needs and adjustments you can make • Use The Scouts’ parent/carer conversation framework • Complete Module 36 to learn how to make different reasonable adjustments. Learn how to adapt activities or badges, flexible age ranges, physical environment, equipment, communication support • Use The Scouts Information Centre, additional needs directory and resources at Scouting for All

LGBT+ inclusion • Remember if a member tells you they’re LGBT+ it’s a positive

LGBT+ inclusion • Remember if a member tells you they’re LGBT+ it’s a positive sign they trust you. • Listen, be reassuring and ask if they would like any support in or outside of Scouts • Signpost to support on the Scouting for All and Young Stonewall websites • Don’t share personal information without permission, unless there is a safeguarding risk (being LGBT+ is not itself a safeguarding risk). Who a person ‘comes out’ to is up to them and will be different for everyone. • Challenge derogatory language e. g. ‘that’s so gay’ • Use visible signs e. g. posters or badges to signal LGBT+ people are welcome. • Include positive messages, awareness and examples of LGBT inclusion at Scouts in your programme.

Trans inclusion • Ask what, if anything, the young person or volunteer needs to

Trans inclusion • Ask what, if anything, the young person or volunteer needs to feel happy and comfortable at Scouts. This might include; a preferred name or pronoun (he/she/they), changes to uniform, toilets/facilities arrangements or activities, support to tell other members in the section, or support outside of Scouting. • Talk about any changes and agree who, how and when they will happen together, making sure the young person or volunteer feels comfortable • Respect members’ confidentiality and don’t share information about them without their consent. • Use the Scouts ‘Supporting Trans Young People and Members’ for more detailed guidance and FAQs

Gender inclusion • Celebrate and share stories and achievements in Scouting that tackle common

Gender inclusion • Celebrate and share stories and achievements in Scouting that tackle common gender stereotypes in your programme • Avoid and challenge gendered language e. g. ‘you throw like a girl’ • Be aware that there are lots of different gender identities • Don’t assume members’ strengths, abilities or interests based on their gender • Avoid allocating different tasks or activities to ‘men/boys’ and ‘women/girls’

Preventing discrimination In Scouts ALL forms of discrimination are considered unacceptable. We have a

Preventing discrimination In Scouts ALL forms of discrimination are considered unacceptable. We have a moral, legal and Scouts duty to challenge all forms of discrimination in spoken and written language, behaviour and any other way that discrimination may arise.

Resources: Training and support • • E-learning for autism Additional training from Team Inclusion

Resources: Training and support • • E-learning for autism Additional training from Team Inclusion UK & ADC/ACC Inclusion Webinars Local organisations Scouting magazine Module 36: Adjustments to Scouts Future training packs Visual stories

Resources: Programme Consider including equality and diversity into your Scout Programme. Refugee Response pack

Resources: Programme Consider including equality and diversity into your Scout Programme. Refugee Response pack Disability Awareness Badges LGBTQ+ awareness He 4 She activities: https: //www. scout. org/heforshe Invite local speakers and charities

Activity: Microaggressions are seemingly incidental language or actions which intentionally or unintentionally, convey a

Activity: Microaggressions are seemingly incidental language or actions which intentionally or unintentionally, convey a negative message, stereotype or prejudice towards a marginalised group. The following activity helps us understand identify microaggressions and how they can impact negatively on marginalised groups.

Activity: Programme ideas In three groups, consider how you would run a session on

Activity: Programme ideas In three groups, consider how you would run a session on the following for Beavers, Cubs, Scouts or Explorers: 1. Gender stereotypes and gender equality 2. The deaf community 3. Disability awareness Think about what information you would need, what activities you could do to make the session engaging, and who you could involve.

Inclusion in Programme These are some tools and ideas to introduce Scout values and

Inclusion in Programme These are some tools and ideas to introduce Scout values and inclusion in your section: • • Scouting magazine World Scouting: Scouts for Humanity World Scouting: He 4 She Learning about different faiths Attending or supporting Pride events Discussing arising social issues fairly and impartially Global Sustainable Development Goals

Further support Scouting for all: scouts. org. uk/scoutingforall HQ: Info. centre@scouts. org. uk For

Further support Scouting for all: scouts. org. uk/scoutingforall HQ: Info. [email protected] org. uk For more information on disability and how to make reasonable adjustments to Scouts, please complete Module 36.

Thank you

Thank you