Shooting Stars Shooting Stars Literal meaning shooting Jews

  • Slides: 12
Download presentation
Shooting Stars

Shooting Stars

‘Shooting Stars’ • Literal meaning- shooting Jews. Symbolise shooting star of David on their

‘Shooting Stars’ • Literal meaning- shooting Jews. Symbolise shooting star of David on their forehead. • Metaphorical- wishes, short lived nature of shooting stars. • Sarcastic reading= reference to Nazis themselves. Implies that soldiers were ‘stars’ for shooting Jews.

‘Stars on all our brows’ • ‘Our’ and ‘my’ – more than one person

‘Stars on all our brows’ • ‘Our’ and ‘my’ – more than one person involved (holding hands). • Star of David-sign of religion. • Target for soldiers.

‘Loosened His belt’ • Use of enjambment-taunting his victim. Used to shock the reader.

‘Loosened His belt’ • Use of enjambment-taunting his victim. Used to shock the reader. • She knows she will be raped and does this to increase fear. • Deliberately graphic so cannot shy away from what the women endured. • Deeply traumatic and disturbing for reader. • Women is powerless.

‘Between the gap of corpses I could see a child’ • Child symbolises hope

‘Between the gap of corpses I could see a child’ • Child symbolises hope and vitality. • Contrast of child and death-life cut short. • Could have grown up to make a difference in the future. • ‘Gap’ suggests there is a large pile and child will soon fill gap.

‘My bowels opened in a ragged gape of fear’ • Suggests violence of rape.

‘My bowels opened in a ragged gape of fear’ • Suggests violence of rape. • ‘Gape’ disbelief and surprise could be a facial expression. Suggests she is faceless to him. Her identity has been erased. • Done this to many women • Spoonerism (gagged rape).

‘After immense suffering someone takes tea on the lawn’ • Easily forgotten. • Duffy

‘After immense suffering someone takes tea on the lawn’ • Easily forgotten. • Duffy trying to create awareness. • ‘someone’ suggests it could be anyone as we know torment was not an isolated case.

‘Sister if seas part us do you not consider me? ’ • Rhetorical question.

‘Sister if seas part us do you not consider me? ’ • Rhetorical question. • 2 nd person. • Metaphor of being separated and segregated because of religion. • Directly appealing to women.

‘I heard a click not yet a trick. ’ • Use of internal rhyme.

‘I heard a click not yet a trick. ’ • Use of internal rhyme. • Recreates the silence that would have been faced. • Mental torture from Nazi. • Full stop strong punctuation.

‘Rebecca Rachael Ruth Aaron Emanual David’ • • Jewish names as sign of their

‘Rebecca Rachael Ruth Aaron Emanual David’ • • Jewish names as sign of their religion. Names identify people cultural ID. Nazis do not see them as individual. Lack of commas suggests more names to come. • No individuality therefore writer gives their names so they have a voice.

‘Upright as statues’ • Use of simile compares the women to a statue. •

‘Upright as statues’ • Use of simile compares the women to a statue. • They are brave like statues as they wont move. However could also be because they are petrified. • Statues made of stone so effective comparison.

Themes/purpose • • • Brutality of war. Cruelty of human nature. Prejudice / intolerance.

Themes/purpose • • • Brutality of war. Cruelty of human nature. Prejudice / intolerance. Oppression of women by men. Remembrance- taking responsibility for human suffering and past events. • Identity.