Sentence Fragments A Breakdown Sentence Fragments A sentence

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Sentence Fragments A Breakdown

Sentence Fragments A Breakdown

Sentence Fragments • A sentence is a group of words that conveys a complete,

Sentence Fragments • A sentence is a group of words that conveys a complete, stand-alone thought. • Mario likes to drive fast. • Every sentence includes a subject (the noun part; who or what the sentence is about) and a predicate (the action, event or being part of the sentence). • Mario likes to drive fast. Subject: Gold Predicate: Orange

What is a sentence fragment? • A sentence fragment is an incomplete sentence. •

What is a sentence fragment? • A sentence fragment is an incomplete sentence. • Sentence fragments come in many forms: • • • Dependent clauses: Because it is raining outside. Subjects: The man with the yellow hat. Predicates: Kept her friend’s secret. Prepositional phrases: With high hopes. Gerund phrases: Singing in the choir. Infinitive phrases: To meet my hero. Participial phrases: Determined to climb to the top. Adverb phrases: Today before we leave. Adjective phrases: Who was angry at his neighbor.

Sentence Fragments: Dependent Clauses • Dependent clauses are probably the most common type of

Sentence Fragments: Dependent Clauses • Dependent clauses are probably the most common type of sentence fragments. • Incorrect: Mitchell wanted to take the train. Because he liked trains. • Correct: Mitchell wanted to take the train because he liked trains. • Incorrect: Becca ran home. When she heard Pat was visiting. • Correct: Becca ran home when she heard Pat was visiting. Dependent clauses can generally be identified by the subordinating conjunctions that so often begin them. These conjunctions include: because, when, after, whether, so that, though, as if, while, etc.

Sentence Fragments Subjects/Objects • Subjects and objects that include prepositional phrases and/or other lengthy

Sentence Fragments Subjects/Objects • Subjects and objects that include prepositional phrases and/or other lengthy modifiers can sometimes be confused for complete sentences. • I talked to her. The girl standing under the tree. • The store with the brightest sign. That’s my favorite. • Mom called us in and we saw. The dinner laid out on the table. Predicates • Lengthy predicates can sometimes be confused for complete sentences. • I left Carl’s house. Walked past Mr. Johnson’s house. • Covered my answers with blank paper. That was so no one could see them. • Told Sarah he was busy. Then he hung out with someone else. Fragments in green

Sentence Fragments Gerund Phrases Infinitive Phrases • Gerund phrases (phrases that include an –ing

Sentence Fragments Gerund Phrases Infinitive Phrases • Gerund phrases (phrases that include an –ing verb used as a noun) can sometimes be confused for complete sentences. They are not. They are fragments. • Infinitives, verbs beginning with “to” used as other parts of speech, are not complete sentences. If they are set apart alone, with a period, they are sentence fragments. • Gene Kelly enjoyed. Singing in the rain. • Swimming in my pool. Is something I enjoy. • To laugh with my friends. Would be my delight. • Her favorite pastime is. To watch classic movies.

Sentence Fragments Participial Phrases Prepositional Phrases • Participial phrases, which contain verbs used as

Sentence Fragments Participial Phrases Prepositional Phrases • Participial phrases, which contain verbs used as modifiers, can be mistaken for complete sentences. • Prepositional phrases can be mistaken for complete sentences. • Angered by what her boyfriend said. Ashley went home. • Covered in chocolate syrup. The strawberries were delicious. • Derrick went dancing around the room. Marked by a look • We need to make sure we pack lunch. Before we leave for work. • Sam decided to study. With the man who writes those books. • In the box of Christmas cards. I found the one I wanted.

Sentence Fragments • Follow these steps to determine whether a group of words is

Sentence Fragments • Follow these steps to determine whether a group of words is a sentence or a sentence fragment: • 1. Look for a subject. • 2. Look for a predicate. • 3. Look for a subordinating conjunction or a preposition, as these often begin sentence fragments. • 4. If you find a subject and predicate and they are not preceded by a subordinating conjunction or a preposition, ask yourself if the group of words creates a complete thought. • 5. If 1, 2 and 4 apply, you’ve got yourself a sentence. • 6. If either 1, 2 or 4 does not apply or if 3 does apply, you’ve got a sentence fragment on your hands. Now… practice these steps with the sentences and sentence fragments on the next page.

Sentence or Fragment? Sentences and Fragments • 1. The butterfly fell because the rain

Sentence or Fragment? Sentences and Fragments • 1. The butterfly fell because the rain struck it. • 2. After I knocked over the lamp. • 3. The child who was eating a lollipop. • 4. Bells ring. • 5. With everything I had and everything I believed. • 6. Because Davy wanted a part in the play. • 7. After swinging on the swing, Kiki ran to the slide. Answers • • • 1. Sentence 2. Fragment 3. Fragment 4. Sentence 4. Yes, 4 is a complete sentence—tiny, but complete. • 5. Fragment • 6. Fragment • 7. Sentence

Congratulatio ns! You’re so awesome that you finished this Powerpoint lesson. Heck yes, you

Congratulatio ns! You’re so awesome that you finished this Powerpoint lesson. Heck yes, you did. Now, make sure you’re ready and see Mrs. Shankle for your quiz. (The zebra is smiling because he’s proud of you. )