Rhetorical Analysis Terms 9090 Terms 2 21 terms

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Rhetorical Analysis Terms (90/90 Terms #2) 21 terms

Rhetorical Analysis Terms (90/90 Terms #2) 21 terms

Expository Highly organized prose which presents a viewpoint supported by fact and explanation Characteristics:

Expository Highly organized prose which presents a viewpoint supported by fact and explanation Characteristics: clear thesis, examples, analysis, structured, formal Examples: ●Essay ●Research project ●ERWC!!

Allegory (adj. Allegorical) The use of fictional characters and actions to represent truths about

Allegory (adj. Allegorical) The use of fictional characters and actions to represent truths about human nature ●Is an “extended analogy” ●Two levels of meaning-- the surface-level story and the deeper meaning (moral, political, philosophical, or religious)

Parable A brief story which teaches a moral and often a religious lesson ●Is

Parable A brief story which teaches a moral and often a religious lesson ●Is a type of allegory ●Interest lies in what things stand for rather than exactly what happens ●Example: Stories in the New Testament

Parody (verb- Parodies) A piece of writing or music that deliberately copies another work

Parody (verb- Parodies) A piece of writing or music that deliberately copies another work in a comical or satirical way

Weird Al- A master of parody

Weird Al- A master of parody

Satire (Adj- satirical; verb- satirizes) A work that attacks human vice or foolishness using

Satire (Adj- satirical; verb- satirizes) A work that attacks human vice or foolishness using irony, wit, and sarcasm ● ● ● Primary purpose is to provoke a response or a reform (rather than just for entertainment) Has a purpose Tone: humorous, critical, sarcastic, sardonic (disdainfully or ironically mocking), tongue-incheek (gentle irony; meant as a joke), hyperbolic (exaggerated)

Irony (adj. - Ironic) Device used to convey a meaning opposite of what is

Irony (adj. - Ironic) Device used to convey a meaning opposite of what is expected

Examples of Irony: Why are these pictures ironic?

Examples of Irony: Why are these pictures ironic?

Paradox (adj. paradoxical) A statement that seems self-contradictory but contains an underlying truth ●

Paradox (adj. paradoxical) A statement that seems self-contradictory but contains an underlying truth ● Examples: ● We had to destroy the village in order to save it. ● He is guilty of being innocent. ● The past in the prologue.

Oxymoron Two contradictory words used together Examples: ● Sweet pain ● Cheerful pessimist ●

Oxymoron Two contradictory words used together Examples: ● Sweet pain ● Cheerful pessimist ● Civil war ● Special curse

Anecdote A short personal account or story used to illustrate a point Anecdotal evidence=

Anecdote A short personal account or story used to illustrate a point Anecdotal evidence= proof derived from observation (stories one can tell to prove an assertion)

Allusion (Verb- alludes ; The author alluded to WWI as an illustration of youth

Allusion (Verb- alludes ; The author alluded to WWI as an illustration of youth being “ruined” by war… References to material outside of the work (Usually are just mentioned rather than explained as an example; must be familiar to reader to work) 1) Literary 2)Historical 3)Current events 4)Pop culture 5)Personal

How many allusions can you find in this short clip? Write bullet notes of

How many allusions can you find in this short clip? Write bullet notes of the allusions as you watch the clip. Show Shrek clip

Synecdoche (si-nek-duk-kee) A figure of speech in which a part of something represents the

Synecdoche (si-nek-duk-kee) A figure of speech in which a part of something represents the whole.

Examples of Synecdoche:

Examples of Synecdoche:

Metonymy (mi-ton-uh-mee) A figure of speech which substitutes a suggestive word for what is

Metonymy (mi-ton-uh-mee) A figure of speech which substitutes a suggestive word for what is actually meant. Examples: ● Using “crown” for royalty ● “Bottle” for booze ● “Bread” for food ● Very closely related to synecdoche

Analogy (adj. - analogous) A comparison of related ideas or things ● ● Extended

Analogy (adj. - analogous) A comparison of related ideas or things ● ● Extended analogy- analogy that is used throughout a passage- Murder analogy in Gregory Peck’s speech and Prayer analogy in Danny De. Vito’s speech in movie Other People’s Money Two types: Metaphor and simile

Epithet A word or phrase which is used as a name to describe a

Epithet A word or phrase which is used as a name to describe a person’s special characteristic

Examples of Epithets: “Magic” Johnson (For his “magical skills on the court) Barbara Bush.

Examples of Epithets: “Magic” Johnson (For his “magical skills on the court) Barbara Bush. The Silver Fox (For her silver hair) ●(Epithet in other contexts is an insulting word or phrase (curse words) ●She used an epithet before leaving him at the altar.

Idiom An expression which is understood by a group of people because it has

Idiom An expression which is understood by a group of people because it has become an accepted saying; usually does not mean what it literally says ● ● Idioms are especially difficult for nonnative speakers Idioms are different in every language

Examples of idioms: ● ● ● ● ● Take a hike. Are you pulling

Examples of idioms: ● ● ● ● ● Take a hike. Are you pulling my leg? It’s raining cats and dogs. Break a leg. Take it easy. Mending fences Don’t choke. Chew on it Basketcase

“It’s raining cats and dogs!” Where does this idiom come from?

“It’s raining cats and dogs!” Where does this idiom come from?

This phrase's origin is unknown. Possible explanations include: ● Lightning and thunder sounds like

This phrase's origin is unknown. Possible explanations include: ● Lightning and thunder sounds like that of a cat/dog fight ● Cats had a big influence on the weather, and the sky dog Odin was attended to by wolves according to Norse Mythology. ● Another theory is that in old England, they had hay roofs on their houses and the cats and dogs would sleep on the roof. When it rained, the roofs got slippery and the cats and dogs would slide off of the roofs. Therefore, it was "Raining Cats and Dogs".

● A scapegoat is someone who gets the blame for a scandal/mistake; typically, the

● A scapegoat is someone who gets the blame for a scandal/mistake; typically, the scapegoat is either completely innocent, or at least is only one of many guilty people. This originates from the Old Testament of the Bible, in which a goat was sent into the wilderness for the sins of its owner. Lev 16: 10: "But the goat on which the lot for the scapegoat fell shall be presented alive before the LORD, to make atonement upon it, to send it into the wilderness as a scapegoat. "

Rhetorical question (erotema) A question which is asked for effect rather than for an

Rhetorical question (erotema) A question which is asked for effect rather than for an answer.

Aphorism A statement that reveals a truth or principle that can be attributed to

Aphorism A statement that reveals a truth or principle that can be attributed to a specific person

Examples of aphorisms “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet. ”

Examples of aphorisms “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet. ” -Shakespeare “Life is like a box of chocolates. ” - Forrest Gump

Proverb The same as an aphorism, but is so generally known that the authorship

Proverb The same as an aphorism, but is so generally known that the authorship is lost Examples: ● “Still waters run deep. ” ● “A rolling stone gathers no moss. ” ● Money is the root of all evil.

Maxim A statement that gives behavioral advice Examples: ● “The early bird gets the

Maxim A statement that gives behavioral advice Examples: ● “The early bird gets the worm. ” ● “Practice makes perfect. ”

Apostrophe Addressing or speaking to a non-living thing or an absent person Examples: ●

Apostrophe Addressing or speaking to a non-living thing or an absent person Examples: ● “Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean, roll. ” ● “I said to Love…” ● “O eloquent, just and mighty Death!” ● A form of personification

Anachronism A reference to something which did not exist at the time of the

Anachronism A reference to something which did not exist at the time of the story. Example: ● The clock that strikes in Julius Caesar even though clocks did not exist in Rome during the time of Caesar ● Many believe that cursive is an anachronism and some elementary schools have stopped teaching it. ● Many believe that cursive is anachronistic and some elementary schools have stopped teaching it.

THE END 90/90 #1 on Monday!!

THE END 90/90 #1 on Monday!!