RESEARCHING COLD WAR TOPICS Starting points in your

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RESEARCHING COLD WAR TOPICS Starting points in your research project. 1

RESEARCHING COLD WAR TOPICS Starting points in your research project. 1

Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Where to begin? • Data bases: SSI; Historical Abstracts; Library

Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Where to begin? • Data bases: SSI; Historical Abstracts; Library reference guides; browsing in library; Internet sites. • Newspaper/Journal accounts in Western countries (Europe, U. S. ) • Other media sources: BBC; VOA; Radio Free Europe • Government sources: Foreign Office reports (U. K. ); Hungarian/Soviet official agencies • Eye-witness accounts: film and radio documentaries; published recollections. • Memoir literature: autobiographical accounts of leading participants, e. g. Nikita Khrushchev. • Secondary scholarly literature: Published (academic) journal articles and monographs on Hungarian rising. 2

Researching the Hungarian Revolution, cont. • Evaluating primary source material: Pro-communist accounts; Anticommunist accounts;

Researching the Hungarian Revolution, cont. • Evaluating primary source material: Pro-communist accounts; Anticommunist accounts; “Neutral” observers. • Government documents: Which agency? Who is reporting? Completeness of descriptive narrative? • Newspapers and journal reports: Based on first-hand observations or news services? Caliber of source: reputable paper and/or journal? • Eye-witness testimonies: Participants; neutral observers; partisans of a political group or movement. • Secondary sources: Quality of academic publication (University or Institution known for upholding scholarly standards. For example, peer reviewed articles. ) 3

Interpreting sources: • Do sources present a wide-ranging view of the event(s) being studied?

Interpreting sources: • Do sources present a wide-ranging view of the event(s) being studied? • Can sources – even those which appear to be one-sided -- be independently corroborated? • Is the range of research material you are using to develop your narrative broadly based? • Does your analysis take into account existing historiographical concerns/trends? • Are your conclusions supported by discussions and supporting evidence cited earlier in the essay? 4

Essay’s analysis • Can you identify clearly the major features of the event/topic you

Essay’s analysis • Can you identify clearly the major features of the event/topic you are developing in the paper? • Does you description of event follow a well-established chronology? • Is your interpretation/analysis grounded in a wide-range of sources? Do your views correspondent to existing interpretations of the events? • Have you properly attributed in your narrative and/or footnotes insights and information obtained from other sources? • Does your bibliography reflect the full range of materials you consulted in the course of investigating your chosen topic(s)? 5