Remember Christina Georgina Rossetti Remember me when I

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Remember Christina Georgina Rossetti

Remember Christina Georgina Rossetti

Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land;

Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land; When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you plann'd: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve: For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige of the thoughts that once I had, Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad.

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ 5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894 ▪ Christina Rossetti

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ 5 December 1830 – 29 December 1894 ▪ Christina Rossetti was born in Charlotte Street, London ▪ Father was Gabriele Rossetti, a poet and a political exile from Vasto, Abruzzo. ▪ Mother was Frances Polidori, the sister of Lord Byron's friend and physician, John William Polidori. ▪ Rossetti was educated at home by her mother and father, who had her study religious works, classics, fairy tales and novels.

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ In the 1840 s, her family faced severe financial difficulties

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ In the 1840 s, her family faced severe financial difficulties due to the deterioration of her father's physical and mental health. ▪ In 1843, he was diagnosed with persistent bronchitis, possibly tuberculosis, and faced losing his sight. ▪ He gave up his teaching post at King's College and though he lived another 11 years, he suffered from depression and was never physically well again. ▪ Rossetti's mother began teaching to keep the family out of poverty.

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ Rossetti began writing down and dating her poems from 1842,

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ Rossetti began writing down and dating her poems from 1842, mostly imitating her favoured poets. ▪ From 1847 she began experimenting with verse forms such as sonnets, hymns and ballads; drawing narratives from the Bible, folk tales and the lives of the saints. ▪ Under the pen-name "Ellen Alleyne", she contributed to the literary magazine, The Germ, published by the Pre-Raphaelites from January – April 1850. ▪ Her most famous collection, Goblin Market and Other Poems, appeared in 1862, when she was 31. ▪ It received widespread critical praise, establishing her as the foremost female poet of the time. ▪ With the death of Elizabeth Barrett Browning in 1861 Rossetti was hailed as her natural successor. [

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ She was ambivalent about women's suffrage, but many scholars have

Christina Georgina Rossetti ▪ She was ambivalent about women's suffrage, but many scholars have identified feminist themes in her poetry. ▪ She was opposed to slavery (in the American South), cruelty to animals (in the prevalent practice of animal experimentation), and the exploitation of girls in underage prostitution. ▪ In the later decades of her life, Rossetti suffered from Graves' Disease, diagnosed in 1872 suffering a nearly fatal attack in the early 1870 s. ▪ In 1893, she developed breast cancer and though the tumour was removed, she suffered a recurrence in September 1894. ▪ She died in Bloomsbury on 29 December 1894 and was buried in Highgate Cemetery.

Summary: ▪ The narrator, who presumably represents Rossetti, addresses her beloved and encourages him

Summary: ▪ The narrator, who presumably represents Rossetti, addresses her beloved and encourages him to remember her after her death. ▪ She asks him to remember her even when his memory of her begins to fade. ▪ Eventually, the narrator gives this person (it is unclear if he or she is real or imagined) her permission to forget her gradually because it is better to "forget and smile" than to "remember and be sad. “ ▪ In this poem Rossetti hones in on the Victorian “cult of mourning”.

Analysis ▪ “Remember” is a Petrarchan sonnet in iambic pentameter, consisting of an ABBA

Analysis ▪ “Remember” is a Petrarchan sonnet in iambic pentameter, consisting of an ABBA octave and a CDE sestet. ▪ Rossetti repeats the word “remember” throughout the entire poem, as if the narrator fears that her beloved will not heed her request. ▪ She also uses repetition to underline the vast boundary between life and death, writing “gone away, ” and later, “gone far away. ” ▪ The “silent land” is a symbol of death, emphasizing the narrator's loneliness without her beloved rather, which is stronger than her fear of death itself. ▪ Acceptance of death is common in Pre-Raphaelite philosophy. Pre-Raphaelites believed that material troubles pale in comparison to the struggles of the mind.

Analysis: ▪ The tone of the octave is contemplative and reconciliatory on the topic

Analysis: ▪ The tone of the octave is contemplative and reconciliatory on the topic of death. ▪ The narrator can finally be at peace because she has renounced her desire for earthly pleasures, such as the physical presence of her beloved. ▪ She is even accepting of death, content to exist only in her beloved's memory. ▪ However, she has not yet made peace with the possibility that her lover will forget her; this form of death would be more painful than her physical expiration.

Analysis: ▪ Even though the narrator seems to reach peace with her death at

Analysis: ▪ Even though the narrator seems to reach peace with her death at the end of the octave, the Pre-Raphaelite belief system demands a further renunciation of human desire. ▪ The narrator’s tone changes with the volta, which is the break between the octave and the sestet. ▪ The volta typically accompanies a change in attitude, which is true in this poem. ▪ This ‘turn’ is signalled by Rossetti’s use of the word ‘Yet’: the argument of the sonnet changes direction at this point.

Analysis: ▪ The narrator even renounces the need to be remembered, which is ironic

Analysis: ▪ The narrator even renounces the need to be remembered, which is ironic because the poem is titled “Remember. ” ▪ She wishes for her beloved to be happy, even if that means forgetting her. ▪ The narrator sacrifices her personal desire in an expression of true love. ▪ "Remember" ultimately deals with the struggle between physical existence and the afterlife. ▪ Rossetti grapples with the idea of a physical body, which is subject to decay and death, and how it relates to an eternal soul.

Questions: 1. What is the effect of compressing such a topic (death and remembrance)

Questions: 1. What is the effect of compressing such a topic (death and remembrance) into just 14 lines (a sonnet)? (2) 2. What is the tone at the beginning of the poem and how does it change? (3) 3. What type of sonnet is this, give reasons? Why is a sonnet an appropriate form of poem? (4) 4. Was Rossetti was a deeply religious person. How does the poem show this? What give quotes to justify your response. (3) 5. Does the speaker seem worried about anything? Give examples. (3) 6. How does the poet use imperatives to underscore her message? In your opinion is this effective? (3)