Reduction activities Context Ted Hughes 1930 1998 was

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Reduction activities

Reduction activities

Context: • Ted Hughes (1930 -1998) was born in Yorkshire, in the North of

Context: • Ted Hughes (1930 -1998) was born in Yorkshire, in the North of England, and grew up in the countryside. After serving in the RAF for two years, he won a scholarship to Cambridge University where he studied Archaeology and Anthropology. The themes of the countryside, human history and mythology therefore already deeply influenced his imagination by the time he started writing poetry as a student. • He made his name as a poet in the late 1950 s and 1960 s and also wrote many well-known children's books including The Iron Man (which was filmed as the Iron Giant). It is for his poetry that he remains important. He was poet laureate from 1984 until his death from cancer in 1998. • The poem itself looks at the scene of a Bayonet Charge, common in World War 1. Task: Summarise the main points on this slide in no more than 5 bullet points. Task 2: What do we imagine Hughes’ overall message might be?

27 December 2021 Exposure Continued • Wilfred Owen was a political poet in many

27 December 2021 Exposure Continued • Wilfred Owen was a political poet in many ways. He went to War in World War 1 as a young officer and suffered a great deal on mental trauma, instead of giving up, he went back to the front to help his soldiers. • Many of his poems were written to show the truth about war and the suffering of the men. He wanted people to understand exactly what they had experienced, often though people thought he was just complaining. • He died just before the end of the war and is work was published by another poet on his behalf. • He is arguably one of the most famous war poets of all time. • In this poem he looks at how the conditions of war were as lethal as the enemy. Do now: Summarise this in no more than 5 short bullet points.

1572 -1631 Metaphysical poet John Donne was born into a Roman Catholic family at

1572 -1631 Metaphysical poet John Donne was born into a Roman Catholic family at a time when the religion was illegal in England. He was educated at Oxford and Cambridge but because of his faith he could not receive a degree. His brother was arrested for harbouring a Catholic priest and died of bubonic plague whilst in prison. During and after his education, Donne spent much of his considerable inheritance on women, literature, pastimes and travel. At the age of 25, he was appointed chief secretary to Sir Thomas Edgerton – and promptly eloped with his niece. This ruined his career and led to a spell in prison and a life of poverty with his new wife. She bore him 16 children, dying in childbirth after 12 years of marriage. He never remarried. Task: Reduce this to no more than 5 bullet points. Donne himself died in 1631, probably of stomach cancer. At that time, he had given up the Catholic faith and had become a famous preacher in the Anglican church.

The Supernatural Task: Reduce this paragraph to no more than its 4 most important

The Supernatural Task: Reduce this paragraph to no more than its 4 most important sentences. You can combine or edit sentences to keep important information. Copy this into your book. Stretch & Challenge: When you’ve finished, use the analysis it provides to complete the revision table. In Shakespeare's time, the powers of evil were thought to be absolutely real; to most people Hell was an actual place and the Devil a constant threat to their souls. In particular there was a fascination with witches and witchcraft. Hundreds of innocent people (mostly women) were executed as suspected witches. The interest came from the very top, led by King James I himself who published a book on the subject called Demonology. When Shakespeare came to write his play, he knew that his audience were terrified by the possibility of supernatural spirits possessing individuals to conduct evil. That James I was almost assassinated in the Gunpowder Plot seemed to challenge traditional notions of God’s election of kings, and this uncertainty caused by fear of the supernatural and Jacobean politics led Shakespeare to write Macbeth.

Reading • Let’s hear a performance of the poem. • Task 1: We will

Reading • Let’s hear a performance of the poem. • Task 1: We will then listen once more. In your book, summarise what each stanza is about in no more than 6 words. • Task 2: Write down 1 word to explain the main emotion in each stanza. https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=x. PF 5 z. Ho. A-7 s Reduction for listening tasks. Can work well with worksheets or printed tables.

Let’s read some critical analysis: Extract A Decide first; work silently; share in 4

Let’s read some critical analysis: Extract A Decide first; work silently; share in 4 minutes Task: You will be allocated with your partner an extract. Then, read through and summarise the key points made in the following table: Focused on: Extract B Extract C Extract D Extract E Extract F Focused on: Focused on: Stretch & Challenge: Which theme do you think is most important to Shakespeare’s message and why? Write a paragraph answering this question referencing the text as evidence.

For Year 11 s, it can work well to have them reduce from the

For Year 11 s, it can work well to have them reduce from the macro to the micro for planning essays/revision. • This activity is from after we have read an entire text and recap the five or so crucial quotations students have to remember. • Model the process on the board, and allow HPAs to complete. Guide from start LPAs and less confident students. This also provides plans for their paragraphs! Macbet h is an unsym patheti c charact er. Key sections for Macbeth Quotation Key word(s) Technique What this says about Macbeth Link to context Act 1, Scene 2 “unseam’d him from the nave to the chaps” “unseam’d” “nave to the chaps” Graphic physical imagery of dismemberment Macbeth is capable of extreme violence from early on. Memories of sectarian violence in Europe in the 16 th century returned with the Gunpowder Plot. Fear of the potential for good Christians to do evil. Act 1, Scene 3 Act 1, Scene 7 Image to aid memory

Mixing reduction with inference-making… • Reduce a visual source to a few key observations.

Mixing reduction with inference-making… • Reduce a visual source to a few key observations. • Use this to make broader inferences. • Assess this with writing. Group activity where students competed to make as many observations as possible on a few identified areas. Students then presented to the class and made inferences, before debating which were more believable claims using evidence from the picture. Students produce a paragraph min. of writing to make inferences about whether life was good or bad in the industrial era.

Task: 1. You will be given a group to work with for this task.

Task: 1. You will be given a group to work with for this task. 2. Your group will receive 3 pictures. 3. Using these images, list as many inferences as you can make about Industrial-era Britain relating to the following questions: • What kind of jobs are available? • What types of buildings are there? Are these new or old? • What crimes can you see happening? • Is there a sewage system? • Is Britain a poor or rich country? • What types of transport are used? Stretch & Challenge: Does life similar better or worse than life today? What are the main similarities and differences? Prepare a group presentation for the rest of the class answering these questions.