Rebuilding Alabama Chapter 6 Chapter 6 Rebuilding Alabama

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Rebuilding Alabama Chapter 6

Rebuilding Alabama Chapter 6

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Think about a time when you and another

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Think about a time when you and another person got into an argument. How did you resolve it? Did you ever regain your friendship? TURN and TALK

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Think about a time when you and another

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Think about a time when you and another person got into an argument. How did you resolve it? Did you ever regain your friendship? Much like an argument you may have gotten in, the northern and southern states disagreed, physically fought, then eventually reunited. Even though the actual “fight” was over…many consequences followed. Though we may make up with our friends, there always apologies that need to be made and trust must be earned back. This was the also the situation with Alabama becoming a part of the U. S. after the Civil War.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 The end of the Civil War brought many

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 The end of the Civil War brought many changes to Alabama, but the most dramatic was the end of slavery. Before the war, almost half of the people in Alabama were in slavery. But after the war, everyone was free. White Alabamians who had supported the Union were excited about a new and different state.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Picking Up the Pieces No one knows

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Picking Up the Pieces No one knows for sure how many Alabamians died in the war, but 20, 000 of the 90, 000 that served never returned home. Another 20, 000 came back wounded. Alabama’s economy was in terrible condition; confederate money was worthless, large cities had been destroyed, many goods had not been available before the war, crops had not been planted, animals were lost, stolen, or eaten, and there were no slaves to work large farms and plantations. There also wasn’t much government. Local officials, judges, and sheriffs weren’t sure how much authority they had.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Picking Up the Pieces President Lincoln announced

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Picking Up the Pieces President Lincoln announced his plan for Reconstruction (remaking the governments of the Confederate states so that they could be readmitted to the Union. Lincoln’s plan: nullify the Ordinance of Secession (cancel the succession), ratify the 13 th Amendment (to follow the law that ended slavery), swear an oath of loyalty to the United States though they could not vote, and promise to pay back any debts from the war. April 14, 1865 - John Wilkes Booth, who supported the southern cause, assassinated President Lincoln. He was shot while attending a play at Ford’s Theater in Washington D. C. After Lincoln’s death, no one was sure if his plan for Reconstruction would ever go into effect, but Vice President Andrew Johnson announced that Lincoln’s plan would still be followed.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Black Alabamians and Reconstruction During the Reconstruction,

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Black Alabamians and Reconstruction During the Reconstruction, slaves began to find out what freedom meant, but needed help. Congress created Freedmen’s Bureau, which distributed food and clothing to former slaves as well as poor whites. It also opened school and found former slaves jobs. Some northerners came to the south to make money. They came with their belongings in a suitcase made of carpet, so they were called carpetbaggers. Many carpetbaggers came to invest money in the state and became good citizens, but others were dishonest. Freedmen became allies with the white Alabamians that had opposed the war. They hoped that blacks would help them keep the wealthy planters form controlling the state government. These white Alabamians were known as scalawags.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Politics After the War President Johnson appointed

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Politics After the War President Johnson appointed Lewis Parsons as governor. He took office in June 1865 and met to draw up a constitution that would allow Alabama to be readmitted into the Union. 6 months later, Robert Patton was sworn into office as governor. Most Alabamians thought the state was reconstructed, but a group called the Radical Republicans believed that the southern states were still under the control of the Confederates that were not doing much to protect the freedmen. To fix the problem, March 1867 the Radical Republicans passed the 1 st Reconstruction Act that removed elected officials from office and placed the state under military rule.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Politics After the War The act stated

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Politics After the War The act stated that black and white men who had not been leaders in the Confederate military would create a new constitution for the state. It had to be approved by US Congress. Finally, the voters had to obey the 14 th Amendment. This amendment made former slaves citizens if the United States. October 1867 -citizens (even freed men) voted on having a constitutional convention. The vote favored a convention and 18 blacks were a part of the 100 delegates elected. This convention wrote the constitution of 1868. In this constitution, many northern ideas were express, women gained some rights, and it required that one fifth of all the state’s revenue($) support public education. ALABAMA RETURNED TO THE UNION!!!

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be elected and sent to Washington D. C. to serve in the U. S. Congress. Some blacks were even voted into these positions. James Thomas Rapier: -born November 13, 1837 -son of a free black barber -educated in Canada; lawyer -came back to Al. to write for a northern newspaper -became a successful cotton planter and got involved in politics -served in the 1 st Republican convention -representative to the U. S. Congress

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be elected and sent to Washington D. C. to serve in the U. S. Congress. Some blacks were even voted into these positions. Jeremiah Haralson: -born April 1, 1846 -born into slavery -educated himself ; minister -moved to Al. and elected to state house of representatives and state senate and later worked for the federal government -he must have felt the tug of adventure because he moved all around the southern states, then to Oklahoma, and then to Colorado where he was killed by wild beasts.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Freedom and Politics Congressmen could now be elected and sent to Washington D. C. to serve in the U. S. Congress. Some blacks were even voted into these positions. Benjamin Turner: -born 1825 -born into slavery in North Carolina -he managed a hotel in Selma for his owner -by the end of the Civil War, he had over $10, 000 in savings -1870 he became the 1 st black man from Alabama to be elected to Congress

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Review Questions 1. About how many 2.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Review Questions 1. About how many 2. 3. 4. 5. Alabamians died during the Civil War? Who were the freedmen? Name 2 requirements that Alabama had to meet to reenter the Union. Why is the 13 th Amendment important? How did carpetbaggers get their name?

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Review Answers 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 - Review Answers 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. About 20, 000 Alabamians died during the Civil War. The freedmen were former slaves that now had their freedom. Some requirements that Alabama had to meet to reenter the Union were ratify the 13 th Amendment, swear an oath of loyalty, and pay back debts The 13 th Amendment is important because it outlawed slavery in the United States. Carpetbaggers got their name because they came from the north to the south carrying all their belongings in a suitcase made of carpet.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Activity In order for Alabama to be readmitted

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 1 Activity In order for Alabama to be readmitted to the Union, they had to do many things. Discuss with your group the requirements the southern states had to meet in order to be readmitted to the Union. Think about all the consequences of the Civil War and the damage caused by the secession of the southern states. 1. Fold a sheet of paper two times so that when unfolded, 3 columns are shown. Trace the columns with a pencil. 2. Head your columns with the following headings: Requirements I Agree With, Requirements I Disagree With, and Additional Requirements 3. Requirements I Agree With - List the requirements that you agree should be met by the southern states before being readmitted to the Union. 4. Requirements I Disagree With - List the requirements that you do not think should be met by the southern states before being readmitted to the Union. 5. Additional Requirements – List at least 2 other requirements that you feel should have been met before being readmitted to the Union. ***Illustrate each column***

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A 3 -2 -1 In your notebook complete

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A 3 -2 -1 In your notebook complete the following: List 3 requirements Alabama had to meet to reenter the Union List 2 problems that freedmen were now experiencing List 1 word to describe the south during this time period

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Land Grant Colleges Morrill Land-Grant Act was

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Land Grant Colleges Morrill Land-Grant Act was passed in 1862 to help support colleges that would prepare young people for practical careers like engineering, agriculture, and veterinary medicine. The college at Auburn (AUBURN UNIVERSITY )-named Alabama’s land grant college in 1872. 1890 - Agricultural and Mechanical College at Huntsville was given land grant funds 1899 -Tuskegee Institute (Tuskegee University) received land grant status

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: Man of Vision William Savery

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: Man of Vision William Savery taught himself to read and write will doing his work as a slave carpenter After the war, he continued his interest in education and began educating other former slaves Attended a Freedmen’s Bureau convention in Mobile in 1865. He then decided to start a school in the home of David White. They hired a young teacher and asked the Freedmen’s Bureau to get more teachers but he still wanted more With the help of General Wager Swayne and the American Missionary Association, Savery bought an old white Baptist college (Oct. 1867) A month later-140 students enrolled in the new Talladega College He continued to work closely with the college until his death

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- The End of Reconstruction Many white Alabamians,

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- The End of Reconstruction Many white Alabamians, former confederates and members of the Democratic Party, didn’t agree with reconstruction They didn’t believe that slaves should have rights that were now taken away from their former masters, didn’t like carpetbaggers holding high political offices, and they wanted things to return to the ways they were before the Civil War. Some disagreed peacefully but others turned to violence. Ku Klux Klan (KKK)-secret club that terrorized blacks and white Republicans to keep them from voting. They wore white robes, pointed hoods, masks, and rode around frightening, beating, and even killing these people.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: After Reconstruction You may think

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: After Reconstruction You may think things would have been different now that freedmen were allowed to vote, but white Democrats regained power because they could control the black vote. The wealthy Democrats controlled the jobs of the freed slaves and white farmers because the freed slaves had no money to buy land many of the white farmers had lost their property. Those who owned large plantations needed help working the land. Sharecropping then developed.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: After Reconstruction Sharecropping-large landowners would

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: After Reconstruction Sharecropping-large landowners would give a sharecropper a place to live, seed, equipment, and anything else needed to make a crop. The share cropper would then plant, harvest, and sell his crop giving a portion of the profit to the landowner Tenant Farming was the same as sharecropping except they usually owned their own livestock and equipment Children of a sharecropper helped with the crops, tended the farm animals, worked in the garden, and looked after siblings. They didn’t have time to go to school because their family needed them to work on the farm. Because the large land owners controlled the lives of the sharecroppers and tenant farmers, they had a lot of political power because they could influence how they voted.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: The End of Reconstruction Many

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- William Savery: The End of Reconstruction Many Alabamians did not agree with the ways of the KKK, it took an act of Congress in 1870 and federal troops to stop the violence they caused. Klan activity decreased when Congress gave former Confederates the right to vote again. 1874 -Democrats elected George Houston as governor. Over the next 3 years Union troops left the state, most carpetbaggers left, and scalawags had very little power. Conservative white Democrats were now in control and Reconstruction was over.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Review Questions 1. What was the Ku

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Review Questions 1. What was the Ku Klux Klan? 2. How did the Democrats gain control of the Alabama government? 3. What was life like for the child of a sharecropper?

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Answers The Ku Klux Klan was a

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A- Answers The Ku Klux Klan was a secret club that terrorized blacks and white Republicans to keep them from voting. 2. The Democrats gained control of the Alabama government when the Confederates were given the right to vote, elected their candidate as governor, and sent out Union troops. 3. Children of a sharecropper helped with the crops, tended the farm animals, worked in the garden, and looked after siblings. They didn’t have time to go to school because their family needed them to work on the farm. 1.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A If you were a freed slave or

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A If you were a freed slave or a poor white farmer in Alabama, what would you do or where would you go for help. Remember…you and your family need things like food, shelter, education, and a way to earn money. Explain your thinking. Turn and Talk Be ready to discuss your thoughts with the rest of the class.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A If you were a freed slave or

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 A If you were a freed slave or a poor white farmer in Alabama, what would you do or where would you go for help. Remember…you and your family need things like food, shelter, education, and a way to earn money. Explain your thinking. Possible responses: Freedman’s Bureau, family members, sharecropping, tenant farming

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Villages, Towns, and Cities Urban areas (city)-Men

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Villages, Towns, and Cities Urban areas (city)-Men worked as store keepers, doctors, lawyers, and teachers. They had public and private schools. There were school and they were in session longer because children didn’t have to work. If families living in the country had money, then they sent their children to boarding schools. Schools in town were better than those in rural areas (country). Schools were segregated-separate schools for white and black. Schools attended by black children didn’t receive as much money.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Birmingham was known as a New South

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Birmingham was known as a New South city of industry. It was called “the Magic City” because it sprang suddenly from an old cornfield. The closest town was Elyton and they didn’t want a railroad to come through their town, so Birmingham began as a railroad crossroads.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Industry and Transportation Many Alabamians left the

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Industry and Transportation Many Alabamians left the farms for towns and cities. Foreigners settled in the larger cities. Mobile and Birmingham had many immigrants living there. Before the Civil War, Birmingham had not existed. During Reconstruction, people became interested in all its natural resources that were able to produce iron and steel (iron ore, limestone, and coal). Work in Birmingham was plentiful and people came from all over the South as well as other countries to live there. Birmingham was on its way to becoming the largest and most diverse city in the state.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Railroads were the main reason towns and

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Railroads were the main reason towns and cities grew during the years after the Reconstruction. Railroads connected towns and offered access to places outside the state. Dothan, Monroeville, Anniston, and Birmingham became major market centers because of the railroad. They also allowed Alabama cotton and iron to be shipped overland to markets outside the state. Alabama goods could now compete on the world market, which offered more jobs and opportunities to Alabamians.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Cotton Mill Towns Cotton mills helped improve

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Cotton Mill Towns Cotton mills helped improve Alabama’s economy. They were built close to where the cotton was grown. Alabama’s thread and cloth could be more cheaply produced in the state than in New England or Europe because mills were built close to where cotton was grown and wages were low. These industries were usually located along a fall line, where waterpower was available. Life for cotton mill families were a lot like the lives of sharecroppers. Everyone worked…even children. The owner of the mill provided housing and credit so workers could buy food, clothing, and other goods. Many owners built schools, churches, company stores, recreational halls, and medical clinics. Many Alabamians wanted to live in cotton mill towns

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Review Questions 1. Name 3 kinds of

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Review Questions 1. Name 3 kinds of schools common in Alabama after Reconstruction. 2. What was the main reason for the growth of many Alabama cities after the Civil War? 3. Where were most cotton mills located?

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Review Questions 1. 3 kinds of schools

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 2 B- Review Questions 1. 3 kinds of schools common in Alabama after Reconstruction were public, private, and boarding schools. 2. Railroads were the main reason for the growth of many Alabama cities after the Civil War. 3. Most cotton mills were located along a fall line where cotton was grown.

Lesson 2: Activity 1 Pager Step 1: Your teacher will assign your group one

Lesson 2: Activity 1 Pager Step 1: Your teacher will assign your group one of the following topics: Freedmen’s Bureau, Ku Klux Klan, Sharecropping, Industry, Transportation, Schools, and Cotton Mill Towns. Your group will be an EXPERT group on this topic. Your job is to teach the class about your topic. Step 2: In the middle of a sheet chart paper, you should illustrate a scene that involves your group’s topic. Use your textbook pictures to guide you. Illustration must be true to the time period. Step 2: Any where on the paper, write 5 words that you think are important in learning the information in this lesson. These words can be words used in the textbook. Step 3: At the top of the page-write 3 facts about your topic you learned in the lesson. Be sure these facts are meaningful to this lesson on life in Alabama during the late 1800’s. Step 4: Answer the following question at the bottom of your paper by using the question as part of your answer: How is your life different/like a child living in Alabama during the late 1800’s? Use details from the text to support your comparison.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Apaches in Alabama September 1886 - Geronimo,

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Apaches in Alabama September 1886 - Geronimo, an Apache war chief and 500 other Apache Indians surrendered to General Miles in Arizona and were sent to Fort Pickens near Pensacola, Florida and others to old army barracks in Mount Vernon, Alabama. They were not used to the rainy weather and the shortage of food and medicine. Many died of Tuberculosis (TB) After a while, things improved. Some of the men worked with local farmers and were able to row and buy better food. 1894, the Apaches were moved to Oklahoma but conditions there were not much better.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War 1898 -U. S.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War 1898 -U. S. went to war with Spain. Cuba (a Spanish colony) was fighting for its independence. Americans wanted to help Cuba gain freedom so the U. S. sent a battleship, the Maine, to Cuba While the Maine was in Havana Harbor it was blown up. April 1898, the U. S. declared war on Spain. Many Alabamians wanted to fight in this war to prove their loyalty to the Unites States after all that had happened during the Civil War.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Though not everyone

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Though not everyone who enlisted actually fought, many Alabamians did and became heroes. Joseph “Fighting Joe” Wheeler: -a confederate general at 28 -an excellent officer in the Spanish. American War -a symbol of southern loyalty to the U. S.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Richmond Pearson Hobson:

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Richmond Pearson Hobson: -a graduate of the U. S naval academy -was captured during the war while bravely attempting to sink a boat and trap a Spanish fleet -later served as a U. S. Congressman -was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1933

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Dr. William Crawford

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - The Spanish American War Dr. William Crawford Gorgas: -an army physician (doctor) -was sent to Cuba where hundreds of soldiers were dying of yellow fever -he concluded that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes -he was able to lower the cases of yellow fever by having oil sprayed on water where mosquitoes laid there eggs -became the surgeon general of the United States

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Annie Wheeler: The Angel of Santiago Fighting

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Annie Wheeler: The Angel of Santiago Fighting Joe Wheeler’s daughter Annie made her own mark in the world. She wanted to go to Cuba with her father to help the wounded soldiers but could not. She eventually found her way to Cuba and worked with Clara Barton (founder of the Red Cross) Because of her work with the soldiers, she was called the “Angel of Santiago” She moved back home to Alabama when her father died in 1906. She left home again during World War to serve in the Red Cross in England France She returned home and continued to care for the sick and needy until her death in 1955. Her home (Pond Springs) is open to visitors.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Alabama at the End of the Century

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Alabama at the End of the Century 1888 -1892: Farm prices were low and farmers were having a hard time paying their bills and taking care of their families. Small farmers supported Reuben Kolb for governor because he was an agricultural reformer. They founded a political party called the Populist Party because it stood for helping poor black and white farmers. They were never able to elect Kolb

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Alabama at the End of the Century

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Alabama at the End of the Century Late 1890’s- many Alabamians felt the future was bright: cotton mills, steel mills, and mines were offering jobs, towns were growing, stores were opening, people talked of progress, and railroads were the link to other places. Sadly, not everyone shared in this prosperity. Sharecroppers and mill workers were in debt and barely taking care of their families. Alabamians remained in good spirits by fishing, hunting, playing baseball, going to church, attending company dinners, and celebrating the 4 th of July by having picnics, contests, and parades. Many children passed the time by playing hopscotch, marbles, and hide and seek. They also invented new games. As the new century began, they looked forward with hope for a period of increased prosperity and progress.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Review Questions 1. What happened to the

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Review Questions 1. What happened to the Maine? 2. Name 2 heroes of the Spanish American War from Alabama. 3. What disease did William Crawford Gorgas help fight against? 4. At the end of the 1800 s, what 3 industries offered new job opportunities to Alabamians? 5. Name 3 favorite activities of Alabama children during this time.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Review Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Chapter 6: Rebuilding Alabama Lesson 3 - Review Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Maine was blown up in the Havana Harbor. 2 heroes of the Spanish American War from Alabama were Fighting Joe Wheeler and Richard Pearson Hobson. William Crawford Gorgas helped fight against yellow fever. At the end of the 1800 s, the 3 industries that offered new job opportunities to Alabamians were cotton mills, steel mills, and mines. 3 favorite activities of Alabama children during this time were marbles, hopscotch, and hide and seek.

Chapter 6 Activity Venn Diagram Step 1: On a sheet of chart paper, your

Chapter 6 Activity Venn Diagram Step 1: On a sheet of chart paper, your group should compare and contrast Alabama before the Civil War (A), After the Civil War (B), and Alabama today (C). Use as many details from the textbook as possible Step 2: Answer the following question on your chart paper by using the question as part of your answer: Would you rather be an Alabamian before the Civil War, After the Civil War, or TODAY? Explain why you feel this way. Give many reasons to validate your opinion. Extension: On your chart paper, illustrate a day in Alabama during the late 1800’s (during the Reconstruction).

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review mercantile Relating to merchants and the goods they sell

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review mercantile Relating to merchants and the goods they sell

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review carpetbagger Northerners who came south after the war for political

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review carpetbagger Northerners who came south after the war for political or economic gain

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review scalawag Southerners who supported Reconstruction in order to take advantage

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review scalawag Southerners who supported Reconstruction in order to take advantage of other Southerners

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Freedmen’s Bureau Distributed food and clothing to former slaves

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Freedmen’s Bureau Distributed food and clothing to former slaves

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Radical Republicans A group that passed the 1 st Reconstruction

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Radical Republicans A group that passed the 1 st Reconstruction Act

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review sharecropper A person who gave part of the proceeds of

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review sharecropper A person who gave part of the proceeds of crop sales to landowner in exchange for rent and seeds

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Populist Party Stood for helping poor white and black farmers

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Populist Party Stood for helping poor white and black farmers

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Market center Locations in which goods are produced and/or traded

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review Market center Locations in which goods are produced and/or traded

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review speculator People who engage in risky business ventures that offer

Chapter 6 Vocabulary Review speculator People who engage in risky business ventures that offer the chance of large profits