Reading Pyramid Handbook Table of Contents Reading Goal

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Reading Pyramid Handbook Table of Contents Reading Goal Record Sheet Reading (Pyramid) Recording Sheet

Reading Pyramid Handbook Table of Contents Reading Goal Record Sheet Reading (Pyramid) Recording Sheet Reading Pyramid Scoring Guide Dewey Decimal Numbers for Kids Multicultural Fiction Journal Sheet Classic or Award Winner Journal Sheet Realistic Fiction Journal Sheet Adventure/Survival Journal Sheet Science fiction or Fantasy Journal Sheet Mystery Journal Sheet Historical Fiction Journal Sheet Fiction (Your Choice) Journal Sheet Non-Fiction (Your Choice) Journal Sheet Biography Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 000 -299 Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 300 -399 Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 500 -699 Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 700 -799 Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 800 -899 Journal Sheet Non-Fiction 900 -999 Journal Sheet Glossary … … … … … … 1 2 4 5 6/7 8/9 10/11 12/13 14/15 16/17 18/19 20/21 & 28/29 22/23 & 26/27 24/25 30/31 32/33 34/35 36/37 38/39 40/41 42 -48

The Pyramid Reading Challenge Name ________________ Pack______________ Grade _________ Year _______ ZPD (Zone of

The Pyramid Reading Challenge Name ________________ Pack______________ Grade _________ Year _______ ZPD (Zone of Personal Development)_____ MULTI-CULTURAL FICTION CLASSIC/AWARD WINNER (FIC) REALISTIC FICTION Journal pgs 6/7 Journal pgs 8/9 Journal pgs. 10/11 Title ____________________ Title __________ Minimum requirement: Author__________________ Author_________ Rdg Level ________ 3 books per term Rdg Level _______________ Term __________________ Term _________ Tcher Approv _____________ Tcher Approv _______ Pyramid # 1 ADVEN/SURVIVAL (FIC) SCI-FI/FANTASY (FIC) MYSTERY (FIC) Journal pgs. 12/13 Journal pgs. 14/15 Journal pgs. 16/17 Journal pgs. 18/19 Title ____________________ Author__________________ Rdg Level _______________ Term __________________ Tcher Approv _____________ HISTORICAL FICTION YOUR CHOICE (FIC) YOUR CHOICE (NON-FIC) BIOGRAPHY YOUR CHOICE (NON-FIC) Journal pgs. 20/21 Journal pgs. 22/23 Journal pgs. 24/25 Journal pgs. 26/27 Journal pgs. 28/29 Title ____________________ Title __________ Author__________________ Author_________ Rdg Level _______________ Rdg Level _______________ Term __________________ Term _________ Tcher Approv _____________ Tcher Approv _______ NON-FICTION (000 -299) Journal pgs. 30/31 NON-FICTION (300 -399) Journal pgs 32/33 YOUR CHOICE (FIC) NON-FICTION (500 -699) NON-FICTION (700 -799) NON-FICTION (800 -899) Journal pgs 34/35 Journal pgs 36/37 Journal pgs 38/39 NON-FICTION (900 -999) Journal pgs 40/41 Title____________________ Title __________ Title __________ Author__________________ Author__________________ Rdg Level _______________ Rdg Level _______________ Term __________________ Term _________ Term _________ Tcher Approv____________ Tcher Approv _____________ Tcher Approv _______ 2 Copyright 1998 All Rights Reserved

Term 1 Term 4 Did you meet your term 3 goals? ___________________ How many

Term 1 Term 4 Did you meet your term 3 goals? ___________________ How many books will you read? ____________________ How will you select your books? ____________________ What did you do well and how can you improve? _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________ How often will you respond in this journal? ____________________________________________________ What reading strategies are you using? _________________ What types of books will you read this term? ________________________________________________ What new goals can you set? _____________________ How many pyramids can you realistically finish this year? ___________________________________________ Term 2 Did you meet your term 1 goals? ___________________ Term 5 Did you meet your term 4 goals? ___________________ What did you do well and how can you improve? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ What reading strategies are you using? _________________________________________________________________ What new goals can you set? _________________________________________________________________ Term 3 Did you meet your term 2 goals? ___________________ Term 6 Did you meet your term 5 goals? ___________________ What did you do well and how can you improve? ___________________________________________________________________________________________ What reading strategies are you using? _________________________________________________________________ What new goals can you set? _____________________________________________________ What new goals can you set? _____________________ 1 _________________________________

READING PYRAMID SCORING GUIDE The Reading Pyramid will be assessed by each student’s Humanities

READING PYRAMID SCORING GUIDE The Reading Pyramid will be assessed by each student’s Humanities teacher by term based upon the number of books read with journal writing and reading goals recorded. Standards for terms 1 - 6 Students will read at least 3 books in the 6 weeks of each term, with journal and goal writing. √ If a student read 4 or more books in the 6 weeks of a term, wrote in journal and set their goal, they would receive a “ 4”. √ If a student read 3 books in the 6 weeks of a term, wrote in journal and set their reading goal, they would receive a “ 3”. √ If a student read 2 books in the 6 weeks of the term, wrote in their journal, set their goal, they would receive a “ 2”. √ If a student read 1 book in the 6 weeks of the term with some journal writing and set their goal, they would receive a “ 1”. √ If a student did not have any evidence of reading (i. e. did not have journal, pyramid, etc. ) they would receive a “ 0”. Term Deadlines: Term 1 __________ Term 2 _________ Term 3 ________ Term 4 __________ Term 5 _________ Term 6 ________ Pyramid Fast Facts: Δ Students will not be able to carry over to the following term additional books over 4 in order to assure that the student is reading all year long. Δ There will be rewards for meeting and exceeding standard… to be announced! Δ The completion of ONE pyramid is required. Anything above and beyond may be rewarded with Reading Celebrations. Δ In order to participate in any Reading Celebrations, students must have met standard. Δ Student book entries on the Reading Pyramid must be within their personal ZPD (Zone of Personal Development). For example: a student with a ZPD range of 4. 0 - 5. 5 should not be reading a book that is 3. 5. Students may read a measure above their ZPD range. Δ Students should not expect to complete several books just a few days before the end of a term. This rush is not viewed as responsible reading and journal writing. Δ The fiction genre and non-fiction Dewey decimal distinctions are to be followed. If a student is struggling to understand or find books within these different areas, please ask for help. 4

 Dewey Decimal Numbers for Kids 000 GENERALITIES 000 Computers, Loch Ness, Bigfoot, UFOs,

Dewey Decimal Numbers for Kids 000 GENERALITIES 000 Computers, Loch Ness, Bigfoot, UFOs, Aliens 020 Libraries 030 Encyclopedias & World Record Books 060 Museums 070 Newspapers 500 SCIENCE AND MATH 700 ARTS and RECREATION 500 Science Experiments, Science Sets, 710 Art Appreciation, History of Art 510 Mathematics 720 Houses, Buildings 520 Stars, planets, astronomy, space 730 Origami, Paper Crafts 530 Physical Science - force & motion, electricity, 740 Drawing, Crafts, magnetism, light 750 Painting 540 Chemistry, Atoms & Molecules, Rocks and 760 Printing Minerals 100 PHILOSOPHY 770 Photography 550 Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Weather, 130 Ghosts, Witches & the Supernatural 780 Music Hurricanes, Tornadoes 150 Optical Illusions, Feelings 790 Sports, Games, Magic, I Spy, 560 Dinosaurs, Prehistoric Animals, Fossils 170 Emotions, Values, Animal Rights Camping, Fishing, Racing, 570 Forests, Rain Forests, Deserts, Mountains, Hunting Oceans, Evolution 200 RELIGION 580 Plants, Flowers & Trees 220 Bible Stories 800 LITERATURE 590 Animals & Insects 290 Mythology, World Religions 810 Poetry, Plays, Jokes & Riddles 591 820 Shakespeare 592 Worms, Invertebrates 300 SOCIAL SCIENCES 860 Poetry in Spanish 593 Corals, Sea Invertebrates 300 Social Issues - immigration, racism, 890 Japanese Poetry, Haiku 594 Seashells, Snails, Octopus World Cultures 595 Insects, Spiders 310 Almanacs 900 GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY 596 320 Government 910 Explorers, Atlases 597 Fish, Frogs, Toads, Reptiles, Amphibians, 920 Flags, People (Biography) 330 Money, Working Snakes 340 Court System, Famous Trials 930 Archeology, Ancient Civilizations Birds 350 Armed Forces – Army, Navy, Air Force, etc. 598 940 Knights, Castles, World War I & II, 599 Mammals of the Land Ocean, Whales 360 Drugs, Environmental Issues, Titanic, European Countries Police, Firefighters 950 Asian & Middle Eastern Countries 600 PEOPLE USING SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY 370 Schools 960 African Countries 600 Inventions 380 Transportation, 970 North & Central American 610 Human body, Health 390 Holidays, Folktales, Fairy Tales Countries, Native American 620 Rockets, Trains, Cars, Trucks Tribes, American History, States 630 Farming, Farm Animals, Cats, Dogs, Pets, 400 LANGUAGES 980 South American Countries Horses 410 Sign Language 990 Pacific Islands, Australia, Hawaii, 640 Cookbooks, Sewing 420 Dictionaries, Grammar Arctic, Antarctica 650 Secret Codes 430 German Language 660 How Food is made 440 French Language 670 Paper Making 450 Italian Language 680 Woodworking 460 Spanish Language 690 Building 490 Hieroglyphics, Japanese Language 5

Glossary Alliteration Repetition of the same sound at the beginning of two or more

Glossary Alliteration Repetition of the same sound at the beginning of two or more words that are next to each other or near each other. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles. (The bad guy or thing) Catastrophe The action at the end of a tragedy, could be the resolution to the conflict. Character An imaginary person that inhabits a literary work. Literary characters may be major or minor, static (unchanging) or dynamic (capable of change). Characterization The means by which writers present and reveal character. Although techniques of characterization are complex, writers typically reveal characters through their speech, dress, manner, and actions. Climax The high point of a story. It is followed by an ending called a resolution, or denouement. Comedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the better. In comedy, things work out happily in the end. Complication One part of the problem or conflict in a story. Complication builds up, accumulates, and develops the primary or central conflict in a literary work. 42

Glossary Conflict (Problem) A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually

Glossary Conflict (Problem) A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. The conflict may occur within a character as well as between characters. Connotation The associations called up by a word that goes beyond its dictionary meaning. Poets, especially, tend to use words rich in connotation. Denotation The dictionary meaning of a word. Dialogue Conversations or discussion in literature. Exposition The first stage of a fictional or dramatic plot, in which necessary background information is provided. Fable A brief story with an explicit moral provided by the author. Fables typically include animals as characters. Falling action In the plot of a story or play, the action following the climax of the work that moves it towards its denouement or resolution. Fiction An imagined story, whether in prose, poetry, or drama. Figurative language A form of language use in which writers and speakers convey something other than the literal meaning of their words. Examples include hyperbole or exaggeration, , simile and metaphor, etc. 43

Glossary Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident

Glossary Flashback An interruption of a work's chronology to describe or present an incident that occurred prior to the main time frame of a work's action. Foreshadowing Hints of what is to come in the action of a play or a story. Image Word painting, or creating imaginary pictures with words. Imagery helps readers form pictures in their minds. Irony In verbal irony, characters say the opposite of what they mean. In irony of circumstance or situation, the opposite of what is expected occurs. In dramatic irony, a character speaks in ignorance of a situation or event known to the audience or to the other characters. Literal language A form of language in which writers and speakers mean exactly what their words denote. 44

Glossary Metaphor A comparison of two different things to show a likeness between them

Glossary Metaphor A comparison of two different things to show a likeness between them that does not use like or as. Monologue A speech by a single character without another character's response. Narrative poem A poem that tells a story. Narrator The voice and implied speaker of a fictional work, to be distinguished from the actual living author. Onomatopoeia The use of words to imitate the sounds they describe. Words such as buzz and crack are onomatopoetic. Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Personification The endowment of inanimate objects or abstract concepts with animate or living qualities. An example: "The yellow leaves flaunted their color gaily in the breeze. " Wordsworth's "I wandered lonely as a cloud" includes personification. 45

Glossary Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often

Glossary Parody A humorous, mocking imitation of a literary work, sometimes sarcastic, but often playful and even respectful in its playful imitation. Personification The endowment of inanimate objects or abstract concepts with animate or living qualities. An example: "The yellow leaves flaunted their color gaily in the breeze. " Wordsworth's "I wandered lonely as a cloud" includes personification. Plot The actions or events in a short story, novel, or play. Point of view The angle of vision from which a story is narrated. A work's point of view can be: first person, in which the narrator is a character or an observer, respectively; objective, in which the narrator knows or appears to know no more than the reader; omniscient, in which the narrator knows everything about the characters; and limited omniscient, which allows the narrator to know some things about the characters but not everything. Props Articles or objects that appear on stage during a play. Protagonist The main character of a literary work. (The GOOD guy or thing) Recognition The point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is. Resolution The sorting out or unraveling of a plot at the end of a play, novel, or story. See Plot 46

Glossary Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an

Glossary Reversal The point at which the action of the plot turns in an unexpected direction for the protagonist. Rhyme The matching of final vowel or consonant sounds in two or more words. Rhythm The recurrence of accent or stress in lines of verse. Rising action A set of conflicts and crises that constitute the part of a play's or story's plot leading up to the climax. Satire A literary work that criticizes human misconduct and ridicules vices, stupidities, and follies. Setting the time and place in which a story, poem, or play takes place. A setting can be a forest , a house, a city, the present, the past , the future, etc. . Simile A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things using like, as, or as though. An example: "My love is like a red, red rose. " Sonnet A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter. Stage direction A playwright's descriptive or interpretive comments that provide readers (and actors) with information about the dialogue, setting, and action of a play. Staging The spectacle a play presents in performance, including the position of actors on stage, the scenic background, the props and costumes 47

Glossary Style The way an author chooses words, arranges them in sentences or in

Glossary Style The way an author chooses words, arranges them in sentences or in lines of dialogue or verse, and develops ideas and actions with description, imagery, and other literary techniques. See Connotation, Denotation, Diction, Figurative language, Imagery, Irony, Metaphor, Narrator, Point of view, Syntax, and Tone. Subject What a story or play is about; to be distinguished from plot and theme. Symbol An object or action in a literary work that means more than itself, that stands for something beyond itself. Syntax The grammatical order of words in a sentence or line of verse or dialogue. The organization of words and phrases and clauses in sentences of prose, verse, and dialogue. Tale A story that narrates strange happenings in a direct manner, without detailed descriptions of character. Theme the main idea or topic in a piece of writing. (ex. struggle against nature, struggle against societal pressure, crime does not pay, overcoming adversity, friendship is dependant on sacrifice, importance of family, Yin and Yang -when all is well, something bad may happen and balance it out- Love is the worthies of pursuits, death is part of the life cycle, sacrifices bring reward, human beings all have the same needs, etc. ) www. life 123. com/parenting/education/children-reading/12 -most-common-themes-in-literature. shtml Tone The implied attitude of a writer toward the subject and characters of a work. Tragedy A type of drama in which the characters experience reversals of fortune, usually for the worse. In tragedy, catastrophe and suffering await many of the characters, especially the hero. Tragic flaw A weakness or limitation of character, resulting in the fall of the tragic hero. Understatement A figure of speech in which a writer or speaker says less than what he or she means; the opposite of exaggeration. 48