PublicPrivate Dialogue Gender and PPD Malcolm Toland Sevi

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Public-Private Dialogue Gender and PPD Malcolm Toland, Sevi Simavi, Shihab Ansari Azhar Vienna, Austria

Public-Private Dialogue Gender and PPD Malcolm Toland, Sevi Simavi, Shihab Ansari Azhar Vienna, Austria 1 -3 June 2010

Options for Application of Gender Lens to PPD 1. Apply gender lens as part

Options for Application of Gender Lens to PPD 1. Apply gender lens as part of more ‘formal’ PPD arrangement • across-the-board application to all policy-level work of the PPD • participation of women in all PPD structures • application of gender-specific indicators • if necessary, establishment of Gender Working Group to supplement efforts of the PPD Working Groups. 2. Focus on sector-specific issues and make link between gender and growth in selected sectors • dialogue platform organized around that specific industry • role of women along the value chain of that industry • (male) actors more likely to weigh-in because they would have a particular stake in that value chain 3. Community-Private Dialogue (CPD) • private sector articulates issues and constraints at the community level in a dialogue with traditional/community leaders Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 2

Why Gender in Investment Climate Reform? § 80 % of the private sector is

Why Gender in Investment Climate Reform? § 80 % of the private sector is comprised of micro businesses, and women are estimated to head over 40 percent of them § Women wait 37% longer than men to see the same government official § It takes women 8 months longer to resolve commercial disputes than men in commercial courts § Annual food production, largely the responsibility of women, has been valued at $55 million per year. § Women are three times more likely to be in the informal sector. Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Gender Challenges in IC work Women have limited voice in public decision making Networks

Gender Challenges in IC work Women have limited voice in public decision making Networks Role Models Access to information Gender neutral laws can have gender-biased outcomes in practice Expensive and lengthy procedures impact women more Interference and harassment from gov’t officials Legal rights may differ for men and women Male consent required to start a business Limited inheritance rights Lobbying Source: Gender Dimensions of Investment Climate Reform: A Guide for Policy Makers and Practitioners, World Bank 2010 4 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Gender Lens – Policy Level Diagnostic Solution Design Implementation and M&E Understand gender roles

Gender Lens – Policy Level Diagnostic Solution Design Implementation and M&E Understand gender roles in the economy Test political / cultural acceptability and create a conducive environment for reform Establish baselines View reform within broader social & cultural context Involve women as well as men in developing appropriate solutions Integrate gender-focused indicators into reform program M&E system Analyze legal status of men & women Link with existing reform strategies for Government Identify laws, regulations, procedures & business obstacles perceived differently by men & women Draw on in-country resources and experience Source: Gender Dimensions of Investment Climate Reform: A Guide for Policy Makers and Practitioners, World Bank 2010 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Gender Lens: PPD process Stage One Diagnostic 1. 1 Consider existing business organizations with

Gender Lens: PPD process Stage One Diagnostic 1. 1 Consider existing business organizations with a gender lens 1. 2 Consider existing PPD structures with a gender lens 1. 3 If appropriate, undertake preliminary dialogue with businesswomen Stage Two Solution Design 2. 1 Ensure women are represented in public- private dialogue structures 2. 2 Undertake training and capacity building activities and build coalitions 2. 3 Adopt pro-active policies to strengthen women’s voice 2. 4 Link advocacy to CEDAW and other international reporting processes 2. 5 Draw on international resources Stage Three M&E 3. 1 Incorporate indicators that throw light on gender aspects of public-private dialogue Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 6

Gender Lens & M&E Indicators (Evaluation Wheel) Mandate and Institutional Alignment § Does the

Gender Lens & M&E Indicators (Evaluation Wheel) Mandate and Institutional Alignment § Does the mission statement explicitly address gender equality and/or women’s issues? Structure and Participation § Are women equally represented in PPD structures? Champions and Leadership § Are there female champions? Do the champions represent women’s issues? Facilitation and Management § Are there women facilitators? Outputs § Do the hard outputs of the PPD address gender issues? Outreach and Communications § Is there outreach specifically focused on women’s issues or groups? Monitoring § Has gender-focused monitoring facilitated better gender-informed target-setting? Sub-National § Does outreach at different levels reach women stakeholders? Sector Specific § Are gender-specific sectoral issues, or gender issues faced by participants, addressed? Relevance to FDI § Do the FDI issues discussed in the PPD have any impact on women entrepreneurship? Post-Conflict/Disaster – Crisis Mitigation/Management § Does the PPD address conflict/disaster/crisis gender-specific issues? Development Partners § Are DPs engaged in promoting a gender focus as part of their support to the PPD? 7

An Idea to test further: Community Private Dialogue § Exchange platform between private sector

An Idea to test further: Community Private Dialogue § Exchange platform between private sector (including and especially informal) and community authorities. § Bottom up gender approach that starts from the chiefs or community leaders to see how to address the concerns of people in their communities. § Lay out issues faced by women in front of commnity chiefs in one-onone meetings not openly threatening their authority, and which could be followed by more open platforms. § CPD based on benefits of reform for the community and the debate carried out to make sense to informal leaders. § Strategic communication plan could be used with specific messages for each community authority to get their help in bettering the business environment for their women constituents. Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 8

PPD Support for Gender Nepal - Federation of Women Entrepreneurs Association of Nepal (FWEAN)

PPD Support for Gender Nepal - Federation of Women Entrepreneurs Association of Nepal (FWEAN) a key input into design of Nepal Business Forum (NBF). Women business issues recognized as key priorities, Women-in. Business Working Group one of 6 WGs. Latin America - Public-Private sector Steering Committee created to support the Single Window for Foreign Trade, women’s participation reached 30%, with actual 50% parity attained for the Single Window Communications Committee. Liberia - Liberia Better Business Forum (LBBF) enabled women entrepreneurs to advocate as part of WGs on regulatory streamlining. Two LBBF WG co-chairs are women, Head of the Governing Board is a woman, Women’s Chamber of Commerce a key stakeholder. Uganda 2005 – creation of Gender Coalition in Uganda and its recommendations incorporated into Uganda's Private Sector Development Strategy 2005 -2009, National Gender Strategy 2005 -2014, and 4 labor laws 2006. Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 9

 CASE STUDY: Pacific Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 10

CASE STUDY: Pacific Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 10

Pacific Business Women Forum • Informal through to big business • Celebrating success and

Pacific Business Women Forum • Informal through to big business • Celebrating success and examining constraints • Examples from other countries and Africa Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Diagnostics 12 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Diagnostics 12 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Investment Climate Solutions and Prioritization 13 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

Investment Climate Solutions and Prioritization 13 Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

PPD in Pacific Improved training and networking for business women • Business Women’s Forum

PPD in Pacific Improved training and networking for business women • Business Women’s Forum created - a network of formal and informal women entrepreneurs, to meet monthly for networking, receive training on business issues, and develop linkages with regional and international organizations • Issues identified through BWF to feed into Gender Working Group of PPD Improved policy dialogue for women’s economic empowerment Improved legal framework for business women • Ensure appropriate representation of business women’s interests in PPD structures • Form a Gender Working Group if the existing PPD structures do not have the capacity to address issues identified ( high level 4 -8 members to form the group) • Ensure reforms to improve investment climate for women are enacted and implemented Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010

 CASE STUDY: Bangladesh Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 15

CASE STUDY: Bangladesh Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 15

Bangladesh Subnational Case Study § Piloted in 4 districts (out of 64) in 2008

Bangladesh Subnational Case Study § Piloted in 4 districts (out of 64) in 2008 § District Women Business Forums established in each district; advocacy and leadership training provided § In all districts: § WBF advocated for establishment of an information center for women entrepreneurs. § In Sylhet § WBF identified trade license process as too lengthy; up to 1 month required § Solution design: WBF approached Mayor to request this requirement be removed. § Solution implemented: Women can now get trade licenses in 6 hours. § WBF identified Access to Finance as a major constraint § Solution design: WBF approached local bank § Solution implemented: Bank has agreed to provide loans to 20 women entrepreneurs, nominated by WBF. Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 16

Voices of the Beneficiaries… § Youtube Video: http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=z. LV 1

Voices of the Beneficiaries… § Youtube Video: http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=z. LV 1 MTp. C 5 q. A Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 17

 CASE STUDY: Cambodia Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 18

CASE STUDY: Cambodia Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 18

Cambodia In March 2010, IFC + Ministry of Women’s Affairs (Mo. WA) hosted workshop

Cambodia In March 2010, IFC + Ministry of Women’s Affairs (Mo. WA) hosted workshop for business women to identify key issues faced by women in business and to develop an action plan to address them. Recommendations: § Strengthening the Women’s Association for Small & Medium Business (WASMB) through reorganization and capacity building to ensure WASMB becomes an effective means for proposing the prioritized actions to the existing PPD structure in Cambodia. § Bring representatives from each sectoral PPD working group into WASMB; will enable getting women entrepreneurs’ issues on the agendas of the most appropriate G-PSF working groups. § Use of modern social networking tools such as Facebook. Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 19

Cambodia Businesswomen in Action Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 20

Cambodia Businesswomen in Action Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 20

Cambodian Businesswomen on Facebook Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 21

Cambodian Businesswomen on Facebook Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 21

Options for Application of Gender Lens to PPD 1. Apply gender lens as part

Options for Application of Gender Lens to PPD 1. Apply gender lens as part of more ‘formal’ PPD arrangement 2. Focus on sector-specific issues and make link between gender and growth in selected sectors 3. Customary-Private Dialogue (CPD) Toland, Simavi, Azhar, 2010 22