PSLE The Hearing Screening Hearing Screening Follow directions

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PSLE The Hearing Screening

PSLE The Hearing Screening

Hearing Screening § Follow directions on the Language Test Cabinet in the materials room

Hearing Screening § Follow directions on the Language Test Cabinet in the materials room on the correct protocol for screening hearing. § The directions are also on the audiometers. § Make your own record sheet.

Hearing Screening For children between 2 and 3 years: It is difficult for us

Hearing Screening For children between 2 and 3 years: It is difficult for us to do a screening with the audiometer. We can try to do conditioned play audiometry (child is trained to place blocks in a container every time they hear the beep) Training the child to the task is crucial and can take a lot of time.

Hearing Screening For children between 3 – 4 years: Children should be able to

Hearing Screening For children between 3 – 4 years: Children should be able to participate in the screening (if not, we have concerns about cognition). Use play audiometry (child places blocks in a container every time they hear the beep). Training the child to the task is crucial and can take a lot of time.

Hearing Screening For children 4 years and up: Children should be able to easily

Hearing Screening For children 4 years and up: Children should be able to easily participate in the screening. You can probably just ask the child to raise his/her hand when s/he hears the beep. Training the child to the task is still crucial.

Hearing Screening Set up and test your equipment BEFORE the child comes into the

Hearing Screening Set up and test your equipment BEFORE the child comes into the room

Hearing Screening Using Conditioned Play Audiometric Screening for the very young child

Hearing Screening Using Conditioned Play Audiometric Screening for the very young child

Step 1. Prepare your materials Have prepared the following: a chair for the child

Step 1. Prepare your materials Have prepared the following: a chair for the child facing the wall (so child can’t watch you in mirror) with a picture to look at a container (i. e. , box or bucket) at least 8 bean bags or blocks or some other small objects that the child can easily throw in the bucket

Step 2. Train the child § Talk to the child about playing “The Pilot

Step 2. Train the child § Talk to the child about playing “The Pilot Game” § Have the child sit in the seat. § Start your training with “voice beeps. ” “Every time you hear a ‘beep’, you throw the X in the bucket. ”

Step 2. Train the child § Give the child a block, and you or

Step 2. Train the child § Give the child a block, and you or your assistant also holds a block/beanbag. “Let’s do it together. Beep” § You/assistant throws in block/beanbag and child throws in block/beanbag.

Step 2. Train the child § Celebrate success! “Yay! You put the block/beanbag in

Step 2. Train the child § Celebrate success! “Yay! You put the block/beanbag in when you heard the ‘beep’. Let’s try it again. ”

Step 2. Train the child § Repeat this a couple of times, gradually letting

Step 2. Train the child § Repeat this a couple of times, gradually letting the child become more independent in throwing the block in. So the clinician can wait until the child throws his/her block in first, then the clinician throw his/hers in. Finally, you stop throwing the block/beanbag at all.

Step 2. Train the child The child should be able to throw the block/beanbag

Step 2. Train the child The child should be able to throw the block/beanbag in independently to a voice “beep” before you put the head phones on.

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Introduce the headphones, turn the d. B up

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Introduce the headphones, turn the d. B up to 80 or 90: “These are headphones, just like what pilots wear. We’re going to listen for beeps out of these. The beeps will be very quiet. Let’s listen together and see if you can put your block in when you hear the beep. ”

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Give the child a block and hold the

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Give the child a block and hold the earphone between yours and the child’s ear: “Did you hear the beep? Throw the block in. ”

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones NOTE: The child should be able to throw the

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones NOTE: The child should be able to throw the block/beanbag in independently in response to the loud headphone “beep” before you put the headphones on.

Step 4. Put the Headphones On § Make sure the headphones are on the

Step 4. Put the Headphones On § Make sure the headphones are on the correct ear. § If the child resists having them put on, your assistant can just hold the earphone on the child’s ear.

Step 4. Put the Headphones On Important Make sure that you have turned the

Step 4. Put the Headphones On Important Make sure that you have turned the d. B back down to the screening level 25 d. B.

Step 4. Conduct the Screening § The assistant gives just 1 block/beanbag to the

Step 4. Conduct the Screening § The assistant gives just 1 block/beanbag to the child at a time. § Present the tones starting at 1000 Hz § Then, move up and down the other frequencies as appropriate.

Step 5. Trouble Shooting § Assistant watches child’s face. § If the child does

Step 5. Trouble Shooting § Assistant watches child’s face. § If the child does not throw the block in, assistant can ask, “Did you hear the beep? ” § If the child nods “Yes, ” remind him/her “Throw the block in. ” § Re-present the tone until you get a reliable response or you must increase the d. B.

Hearing Screening Using the Hand Raise Response for the older child

Hearing Screening Using the Hand Raise Response for the older child

Step 1. Prepare your materials You will need: Audiometer (set up and tested) Chair

Step 1. Prepare your materials You will need: Audiometer (set up and tested) Chair facing away from you and from the mirror

Step 2. Train the child Tell the child: “Every time you hear the beep,

Step 2. Train the child Tell the child: “Every time you hear the beep, raise your hand. Let’s practice. Beep” Make sure the child understands the task!

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Warn the child that you will be placing

Step 3. Introduce the Headphones § Warn the child that you will be placing the headphones on and that the s/he will hear beeps.

Step 4. Put the Headphones On § Make sure you put the correct headphone

Step 4. Put the Headphones On § Make sure you put the correct headphone on the correct ear.

Step 4. Conduct the Screening § Remind the child to “raise your hand when

Step 4. Conduct the Screening § Remind the child to “raise your hand when you hear the beep. ” § Present the tones starting at 1000 Hz § Then, move up and down the other frequencies as appropriate.

Step 5. Trouble Shooting § Assistant watches child’s face. § If the child does

Step 5. Trouble Shooting § Assistant watches child’s face. § If the child does not raise a hand, assistant can ask, “Did you hear the beep? ” § If the child nods “Yes, ” remind him/her “Raise your hand. ” § Re-present the tone until you get a reliable response or you must increase the d. B.

Final Words § To get good at anything you must practice, practice! § Take

Final Words § To get good at anything you must practice, practice! § Take the time to practice doing hearing screenings (both Conditioned Play Audiometry and the Hand Raising Response) several times with your teammates before you do it on an actual client.