Primate Evolution THINK ABOUT IT Primates means first

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Primate Evolution

Primate Evolution

THINK ABOUT IT – Primates means “first” in Latin. But what are primates “first”

THINK ABOUT IT – Primates means “first” in Latin. But what are primates “first” in? – When primates appeared, there was little to distinguish them from other mammals. As primates evolved, however, several characteristics became distinctive.

What Is a Primate? – Primates share several adaptations for a life spent in

What Is a Primate? – Primates share several adaptations for a life spent in trees. – In general, a primate is a mammal that has relatively long fingers and toes with nails instead of claws, arms that can rotate around shoulder joints, a strong clavicle, binocular vision, and a well-developed cerebrum. – You can see most of these characteristics in a lemur.

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Primates typically have five flexible fingers and toes on

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Primates typically have five flexible fingers and toes on each hand or foot that can grip objects firmly and precisely, enabling many primates to run along tree limbs and swing from branches with ease.

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Most primates have thumbs and big toes that can

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Most primates have thumbs and big toes that can move against the other digits, allowing them to hold objects firmly in their hands or feet.

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Primates’ arms can rotate in broad circles around a

Fingers, Toes, and Shoulders – Primates’ arms can rotate in broad circles around a strong shoulder joint attached to a strong clavicle, or collar bone, making them well suited for climbing.

Binocular Vision – Many primates have forward-facing eyes, giving them excellent binocular vision. –

Binocular Vision – Many primates have forward-facing eyes, giving them excellent binocular vision. – Binocular vision is the ability to combine visual images from both eyes, providing depth perception and a three-dimensional view of the world. – This comes in handy for judging the locations of tree branches, from which many primates, like this lemur, swing.

Well-Developed Cerebrum – In primates, the “thinking” part of the brain—the cerebrum—is large and

Well-Developed Cerebrum – In primates, the “thinking” part of the brain—the cerebrum—is large and intricate, which enables more-complex behaviors than are found in many other mammals. – For example, many primate species create elaborate social systems that include extended families, adoption of orphans, and even warfare between rival troops.

Evolution of Primates – Humans and other primates evolved from a common ancestor that

Evolution of Primates – Humans and other primates evolved from a common ancestor that lived more than 65 million years ago.

Evolution of Primates: – Early in their history, primates split into two groups.

Evolution of Primates: – Early in their history, primates split into two groups.

Evolution of Primates – Primates in one of these groups look very little like

Evolution of Primates – Primates in one of these groups look very little like typical monkeys. This group contains the lemurs and lorises. • Prosimians

Lemurs and Lorises – Lemurs and lorises are small, nocturnal primates with large eyes

Lemurs and Lorises – Lemurs and lorises are small, nocturnal primates with large eyes adapted to seeing in the dark. Many have long snouts. – Living members include the bush babies of Africa, the lemurs of Madagascar, and the lorises of Asia.

Evolution of Primates: • The other group includes tarsiers and the anthropoids.

Evolution of Primates: • The other group includes tarsiers and the anthropoids.

Tarsiers and Anthropoids • Anthropoids, or humanlike primates, include monkeys, great apes, and humans.

Tarsiers and Anthropoids • Anthropoids, or humanlike primates, include monkeys, great apes, and humans.

Tarsiers and Anthropoids – Anthropoids split into two groups around 45 million years ago,

Tarsiers and Anthropoids – Anthropoids split into two groups around 45 million years ago, as the continents on which they lived moved apart. • old world monkeys • new world monkeys

New World Monkeys – The New World monkeys are found in Central and South

New World Monkeys – The New World monkeys are found in Central and South America. – Members of this group live almost entirely in trees. They have long, flexible arms that enable them to swing from branches. – New World monkeys also have a long, prehensile tail that can coil tightly enough around a branch to serve as a “fifth hand. ”

Old World Monkeys and Great Apes – The other anthropoid branch, which evolved in

Old World Monkeys and Great Apes – The other anthropoid branch, which evolved in Africa and Asia, includes the Old World monkeys and great apes. – Old World monkeys spend time in trees but lack prehensile tails.

Old World Monkeys and Great Apes – Recent DNA analyses confirm that, among the

Old World Monkeys and Great Apes – Recent DNA analyses confirm that, among the old world monkeys, chimpanzees are humans’ closest relatives. http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=v. JFo 3 tr. Mu. D 8

Family Hominidae • The Hominidae also known as great apes form a taxonomic family

Family Hominidae • The Hominidae also known as great apes form a taxonomic family of primates, including four extant genera: – chimpanzees (Pan) – 2 species – gorillas (Gorilla) – 2 species – humans (Homo) – 1 species – orangutans (Pongo) – 2 species.

Hominine Evolution – Hominines evolved the ability to walk upright, grasping thumbs, and large

Hominine Evolution – Hominines evolved the ability to walk upright, grasping thumbs, and large brains. – The skull, neck, spinal column, hip bones, and leg bones of early hominine species changed shape in ways that enabled later species to walk upright.

Hominine Evolution – The evolution of bipedal, or two-footed, locomotion was very important, because

Hominine Evolution – The evolution of bipedal, or two-footed, locomotion was very important, because it freed both hands to use tools. – The hominine hand evolved an opposable thumb that could touch the tips of the fingers, enabling the grasping of objects and the use of tools.

Hominine Evolution – Hominines evolved much larger brains. – Most of the difference in

Hominine Evolution – Hominines evolved much larger brains. – Most of the difference in brain size results from an expanded cerebrum, which is, as you recall, the “thinking” part of the brain.

Hominine Evolution – Between 6 and 7 million years ago, the lineage that led

Hominine Evolution – Between 6 and 7 million years ago, the lineage that led to humans split from the lineage that led to chimpanzees.

Hominine Evolution – This figure shows some ways in which the skeletons of modern

Hominine Evolution – This figure shows some ways in which the skeletons of modern humans differ from those of hominoids such as gorillas.

Human Relatives Versus Ancestors

Human Relatives Versus Ancestors

Ancient Hominids – In 2002, paleontologists in Africa discovered a fossil skull roughly 7

Ancient Hominids – In 2002, paleontologists in Africa discovered a fossil skull roughly 7 million years old. This fossil, called Sahelanthropus, is a million years older than any known hominine.

Ancient Hominids Australopithecus – Hominines of the genus Australopithecus lived from about 4 million

Ancient Hominids Australopithecus – Hominines of the genus Australopithecus lived from about 4 million to about 1. 5 million years ago. Australopithecus afarensis fossils are shown. – These hominines were bipedal apes, but their skeletons suggest that they probably spent some time in trees. – The structure of their teeth suggests a diet rich in fruit.

Ancient Hominids Australopithecus – Australopithecus afarensis fossils indicate the species had small brains. Excavations

Ancient Hominids Australopithecus – Australopithecus afarensis fossils indicate the species had small brains. Excavations have found fossilized humanlike footprints that were probably made by members of A. afarensis about 3. 6 million years ago. Such finds show that homines walked bipedally before large brains evolved.

Ancient Hominids Lucy – The best-known A. afarensis specimen is a partial skeleton of

Ancient Hominids Lucy – The best-known A. afarensis specimen is a partial skeleton of an adult female discovered in 1974, nicknamed “Lucy. ” – Lucy stood about 1 meter tall and lived about 3. 2 million years ago.

Ancient Hominids The Dikika Baby – In 2006, an Ethiopian researcher announced the discovery

Ancient Hominids The Dikika Baby – In 2006, an Ethiopian researcher announced the discovery of some 3. 3 million-year-old fossils of a very young A. afarensis female, nicknamed “the Dikika Baby. ” – The skeleton included a nearly full skull and jaws, torso, spinal column, limbs, and left foot. – Leg bones confirmed that the Dikika Baby walked bipedally, while her arm and shoulder bones suggest that she would have been a better climber than modern humans.

Hominine Relationships

Hominine Relationships

Out of Africa—But When and Who? – Researchers agree that our genus originated in

Out of Africa—But When and Who? – Researchers agree that our genus originated in Africa and migrated from there to populate the world. – Some current hypotheses about when hominines first left Africa and which species made the trip are shown in the figure.

Modern Humans – The story of modern humans over the past 200, 000 years

Modern Humans – The story of modern humans over the past 200, 000 years involves two main species: Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens.

Homo neanderthalensis – Neanderthals flourished in Europe and western Asia beginning about 200, 000

Homo neanderthalensis – Neanderthals flourished in Europe and western Asia beginning about 200, 000 years ago. – Evidence suggests that they made stone tools, lived in complex social groups, had controlled use of fire, were excellent hunters, and performed simple burial rituals. – Neanderthals survived in parts of Europe until about 28, 000– 24, 000 years ago.

Modern Homo sapiens – Anatomically modern Homo sapiens arrived in the Middle East from

Modern Homo sapiens – Anatomically modern Homo sapiens arrived in the Middle East from Africa about 100, 000 years ago.

Modern Homo sapiens – By about 50, 000 years ago, H. sapiens populations, including

Modern Homo sapiens – By about 50, 000 years ago, H. sapiens populations, including some now known as Cro-Magnons, were using new technology to make more sophisticated stone blades and were making tools from bones and antlers. – They produced spectacular cave paintings and buried their dead with elaborate rituals.

Modern Homo sapiens – Neanderthals and H. sapiens lived side by side in the

Modern Homo sapiens – Neanderthals and H. sapiens lived side by side in the Middle East for about 50, 000 years. – Later, both groups moved into Europe, where they coexisted for several thousand years. – For the last 24, 000 years, however, Homo sapiens have been Earth’s only hominine. – Why did Neanderthals disappear? Did they interbreed with H. sapiens? No one knows for sure.