PreAP English II AUGUST 23 2017 AS YOU

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Pre-AP English II AUGUST 23, 2017 AS YOU COME IN TAKE OUT YOUR JOURNAL

Pre-AP English II AUGUST 23, 2017 AS YOU COME IN TAKE OUT YOUR JOURNAL OR A SHEET OF PAPER AND RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING: IN MARY SHELLEY'S FRANKENSTEIN, THE CREATURE IS REPEATEDLY REJECTED; FIRST BY HIS CREATOR, THEN BY SOCIETY. THIS REJECTION HAS AN ENORMOUS IMPACT ON HIS THOUGHTS AND ACTIONS. DESCRIBE A SPECIFIC SITUATION IN WHICH A PERSON MIGHT FEEL HE OR SHE IS BEING REPEATEDLY REJECTED BY OTHERS. WHAT EMOTIONAL RESPONSE MIGHT THE PERSON HAVE? WHY?

Yesterday We… Discussed the historical context surrounding the writing of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Events

Yesterday We… Discussed the historical context surrounding the writing of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Events in Shelley’s life Cultural responses to The Enlightenment Scientific & medical experimentation Discussed the differences between the 1818 and 1831 versions of Frankenstein and what may have caused Shelley to make those changes

Objectives Students will continue their analysis of Frankenstein by focusing on the characteristics of

Objectives Students will continue their analysis of Frankenstein by focusing on the characteristics of sub-genres associated with the novel. They will make complex inferences and draw conclusions about how those characteristics impact the plot, characters, settings, and themes of the novel. They will analyze the novel’s form and narration. They will demonstrate their understanding of mood, tone, diction, syntax and apply that knowledge to their understanding of the novel. TEKS: E 2(2), (5)(A, C, D); CCRS: ELA (II. A. 2, 3, 7)(II. C. 1, 2, 3)

Characteristics of Romantic Literature Began in the late 1700 s and continued and flourished

Characteristics of Romantic Literature Began in the late 1700 s and continued and flourished in the early to mid 1800 s Not just literature – also included music and other arts; new wealth, social stability, progress during The Enlightenment Though the Romantic period is over, its styles and values continue on Feelings, emotions, imagination take priority over knowledge and facts Youth as the “golden age”; child-like innocence Nature as beauty and truth Heroic individualism “Outsiders” sometimes referred to as “freaks” Nostalgia for the past Desire or “will” as motivation Excesses and extremes celebrated Common man idealized Idealized and abstract settings

Roses are red, violets are blue Frankenstein is Romantic, it’s true Finding the Romantic

Roses are red, violets are blue Frankenstein is Romantic, it’s true Finding the Romantic in Frankenstein Love of Nature “. . . I feel a cold northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces my nerves, and fills me with delight. “ (Letter #1) "I have often attributed my attachment to, my passionate enthusiasm for, the dangerous mysteries of the ocean, to that production of the most imaginative of modern poets. “ (Letter #2) Belief in the Power of the Individual “Six years have passed since I resolved on my present undertaking. I can, even now, remember the hour from which I dedicated myself to this great enterprise. ” (Letter #1) Desire to Explore the Unknown “…when shall I return? …If I succeed, many months, perhaps years, will pass before you and I may meet. If I fail, you will see me again soon, or never. ” (Letter #1)

Roses are red, violets are blue Frankenstein is Romantic, it’s true What are some

Roses are red, violets are blue Frankenstein is Romantic, it’s true What are some more examples of how the Romantic Period is manifest in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein? Can you name other Romantic novels? Authors? Composers?

Characteristics of Gothic Literature There is a lot of overlap between Gothic and Romantic

Characteristics of Gothic Literature There is a lot of overlap between Gothic and Romantic literature Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto is accepted as the first Gothic Novel Elements of a Gothic Novel Setting in a castle Atmosphere of mystery and suspense An ancient prophecy Omens, portents, visions Supernatural or unexplainable events Extreme emotion Women in distress Gloom and horror (metonymy)

Gothic, not Goth Monsters don’t wear all black Finding the Gothic in Frankenstein Gothic

Gothic, not Goth Monsters don’t wear all black Finding the Gothic in Frankenstein Gothic settings Gothic themes Rain and darkness, “It was a dreary night of November…” (Ch 4) “You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of enterprise which you have regarded with evil forebodings…” (Letter #1) The creature himself Victor’s creation is a violation of nature and the natural order Using body parts from dead bodies alludes to horror; supernatural consequences

Gothic, not Goth Monsters don’t wear all black What are some more examples of

Gothic, not Goth Monsters don’t wear all black What are some more examples of the gothic in Frankenstein? Can you name any other Gothic novels?

Epistolary Novel Epistolary novel: a novel written in the form of a series of

Epistolary Novel Epistolary novel: a novel written in the form of a series of letters What impact does this form have on the story? What “person” is the story written in? Does this matter? Why?

Mood & Tone In the literary sense, what are mood and tone? Mood: the

Mood & Tone In the literary sense, what are mood and tone? Mood: the literary element that evokes certain feelings in the reader through words and descriptions; it creates the emotional situation that surrounds the reader Tone: the attitude of the writer toward the subject or audience; conveyed through word choice or viewpoint

Mood and tone…not how loud your mom screams when she’s mad What is/are the

Mood and tone…not how loud your mom screams when she’s mad What is/are the mood(s) present in Frankenstein? Give examples of how Shelley establishes mood? What is/are the general tone(s) of the novel? What can we infer about Shelley’s attitude toward the story? Her readers (audience)?

Questions?

Questions?

Tomorrow We Will… Look more deeply at the characters in Frankenstein Who are they?

Tomorrow We Will… Look more deeply at the characters in Frankenstein Who are they? Who is the hero? The villain? And why does Mary Shelley tell so many stories that don’t seem to belong? Learn about tropes, motifs, and archetypes and why you’ll recognize a lot of literary characters from other stories in Mary Shelley’s characters

Homework Work on your group study guides If you want to come to my

Homework Work on your group study guides If you want to come to my room during tutorials to work, please get a pass BEFORE YOU LEAVE, check in with your teacher and get permission before coming here. Work together! You will be working with this group on an extension lesson after we finish our discussion and exam.