POL 101 Responsible Citizenship Faithful Citizenship Faithful Citizenship

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POL 101: Responsible Citizenship Faithful Citizenship

POL 101: Responsible Citizenship Faithful Citizenship

Faithful Citizenship I. III. IV. V. What does it mean to be a “faithful

Faithful Citizenship I. III. IV. V. What does it mean to be a “faithful citizen? ” Seven Key themes to Catholic Social Teaching Further exploration of issues Moral responsibilities of citizens Putting it all together…

What does it mean to be a “faithful citizen? ” Forming Consciences for Faithful

What does it mean to be a “faithful citizen? ” Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship • Chapter touches on the important connection between Catholic church and political life. • Issues of conscience, justice, and rights are important consideration in life. • Faithful Citizenship is more than just being Catholic and is not limited to the issues addressed in this chapter.

Seven Key themes to Catholic Social Teaching 1. The Right to Life and Dignity

Seven Key themes to Catholic Social Teaching 1. The Right to Life and Dignity of the Human Person – human life is sacred and must be protected. 2. Call to Family, Community, and Participation – family as man and woman, everyone has obligation to participate, community in large and small settings. 3. Rights and Responsibilities – “food and shelter, education and employment, health care and housing, freedom of religion, and family life. ”

Seven Key themes to Catholic Social Teaching 4. Option for the Poor and Vulnerable

Seven Key themes to Catholic Social Teaching 4. Option for the Poor and Vulnerable – “those who are weak, vulnerable, and most in need deserve preferential treatment. ” 5. Dignity of work and the Rights of Workers – “economic justice and well-being of all. ” 6. Solidarity – “we are one human family, whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic, and ideological differences. ” 7. Caring for God’s Creation – stewards of the earth.

Further exploration of issues The “art of the possible” allows someone to oppose laws

Further exploration of issues The “art of the possible” allows someone to oppose laws while understanding they may not change. Examine the following within the context of the chapter and your own views on the topics: • Abortion • Human Cloning • Euthenasia • Stem Cell Research

Further exploration of issues More issues: • Health care reform • War in Iraq/Afghanistan

Further exploration of issues More issues: • Health care reform • War in Iraq/Afghanistan • Immigration • Welfare • Death penalty • Torture of enemy combatants • Definition of marriage and family • Global warming

Moral responsibilities of citizens What is moral responsibility? • Obligation to others in a

Moral responsibilities of citizens What is moral responsibility? • Obligation to others in a democracy? • What values do we want in government? • What should be the U. S. response to other countries? • How should the U. S. address hunger, poverty, murder, etc. ?

Moral responsibilities of citizens • What are obligations of citizens in a democracy? •

Moral responsibilities of citizens • What are obligations of citizens in a democracy? • What are the consequences for not being a “good” citizen? • Differences between legal, ethical, and spiritual beliefs – conflict in values? Which one should we follow to be morally “right? ”

Putting it all together… • Chapter explains U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops views

Putting it all together… • Chapter explains U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops views on Faithful Citizenship. • Many issues are contained within the document and impact policy decisions. • Decisions based on morality exist in present society. • Legal, ethical, and spiritual obligations are present in American society; participation is necessary to put in your views.