Poetry What is poetry How is poetry different

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Poetry What is poetry? How is poetry different from prose? What are the features

Poetry What is poetry? How is poetry different from prose? What are the features of poetry? What kinds of poems are there? How do I approach and interpret poetry?

Poetry is: A form of expression (arguably the purest there is) A creative use

Poetry is: A form of expression (arguably the purest there is) A creative use of words intended to stir emotion in the reader Often written in verse, but it can take any shape. There are no rules for writing poetry, but it is usually structured differently than prose.

Poetical Terms Line – the basic unit of a poem. Serves the same purpose

Poetical Terms Line – the basic unit of a poem. Serves the same purpose as a sentence in prose. Two roads diverged in a yellow w

Poetical Terms Meter – A set number of syllables in each line. (Think beat!)

Poetical Terms Meter – A set number of syllables in each line. (Think beat!) Iambic Pentameter – arguably the most well known meter, famously used by William Shakespeare to write his sonnets. Eminem also uses iambic pentameter in many of his rap songs.

Poetical Terms Stanza – A grouping of lines. The equivalent to a paragraph in

Poetical Terms Stanza – A grouping of lines. The equivalent to a paragraph in prose. They will usually be at least two lines. Couplet – a two-line stanza Triplet – a three line stanza Quatrain – a four line stanza Cinquain – a five line stanza

Poetical Terms Rhyme Scheme – The pattern of rhymes in a stanza. Not all

Poetical Terms Rhyme Scheme – The pattern of rhymes in a stanza. Not all poems will have one because not all poems rhyme. Dust of Snow by Robert Frost Poems of more than one stanza often repeat the same rhyme scheme in each stanza. A B C D The way a crow Shook down on me The dust of snow From a hemlock tree Has given my heart A change of mood And save some part Of a day I had rued.

Poetical Terms Repetition – The repeating of a sound, word, or phrase for emphasis

Poetical Terms Repetition – The repeating of a sound, word, or phrase for emphasis Inside the house (I get ready) Inside the car (I go to school) Inside the school (I wait for the bell to ring)

Poetical Terms Figurative Language – When you describe something by comparing it to something

Poetical Terms Figurative Language – When you describe something by comparing it to something else. It goes beyond literal meaning to compare two things that aren’t usually thought of being a like. The sun hung like an orange in the sky No, silly! I was speaking figuratively.

Kinds of figurative language Simile – compares two things that are essentially unlike. Usually

Kinds of figurative language Simile – compares two things that are essentially unlike. Usually contains the words like or as. The clouds looked like cotton candy. Grandpa was as stubborn as a mule Tom's head is as hard as a rock. Metaphor – makes an implied comparison between two unlike things that actually have something important in common. Clouds are cotton candy. They are fluffy. Grandpa was a mule. They are stubborn. Tom is a rock. They are hard.

Poetical terms Alliteration – repetition of the same sounds at the beginning of words

Poetical terms Alliteration – repetition of the same sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables. Silvery snowflakes fall silently Softly sheathing all with moonlight Until sunrise slowly shows Snow softening swiftly.

Poetical Terms Imagery - an appeal to the five senses to help you imagine

Poetical Terms Imagery - an appeal to the five senses to help you imagine seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, or touching what they are describing. Fog The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches and then moves on. By: Carl Sandburg

Poetical Terms Hyperbole – an exaggerated statement used to emphasize a point. Ex. “I’ve

Poetical Terms Hyperbole – an exaggerated statement used to emphasize a point. Ex. “I’ve told you students a million times, turn your homework in on time!” Onomatopoeia – words that imitate the sounds of objects or actions. Ex. “The bees buzzed freely. ” “Bang, bang went the gun. ” “The cat meowed. ” Personification – when the author gives the qualities of a human to an animal, object, or idea. Ex. The brave, handsome tree fell with a creaking, rendering cry.

Kinds of Poems come in all shapes and sizes. They can be generally categorized

Kinds of Poems come in all shapes and sizes. They can be generally categorized based on common features. Free Verse – Contains no apparent structure in terms of rhyme, rhythm, or meter. Haiku – Traditional Japanese poem containing exactly 17 syllables in a 5 -7 -5 structure. They usually refer to a season. HAIL by Paul Mc. Cann They fell in showers. Like diamonds upon the ground Big hailstones were found.

More kinds of Poems Limerick – Consists of five lines with an A A

More kinds of Poems Limerick – Consists of five lines with an A A B B A rhyme scheme. The 1 st, 2 nd, and 5 th line are a trimeter (three distinct beats) while the 3 rd and 4 th are a dimeter (two distinct beats). Old Man with a Beard Edward Lear There was an Old Man with a beard, Who said, 'It is just as I feared! Two Owls and a Hen, Four Larks and a Wren, Have all built their nests in my beard!' A A B B A

Even more kinds of Poems Narrative Poem – consists of simple stanzas and usually

Even more kinds of Poems Narrative Poem – consists of simple stanzas and usually has a refrain. Intended to be sung. Usually of folk origin Epic Poem – A long and stylized poem detailing the heroic accomplishments of a hero. Ex. The Odyssey, The Iliad, Beowulf, Paradise Lost Lyric Poem – A short poem of songlike quality.

Three steps to successfully understanding a poem 1. What is definitely going on? What

Three steps to successfully understanding a poem 1. What is definitely going on? What concrete actions occur? 2. How does this poem make me feel? What are my impressions of the poem? 3. Go back to the text of the poem and look at the details (the words, the form, the meter). Do they support your feelings and impressions? If so, how? Go deeper.

Step 1: What is actually happening? Examine the text of the poem. Summarize the

Step 1: What is actually happening? Examine the text of the poem. Summarize the events that occur. Draw a picture or a map if it helps.

Step 2: How does this make me feel? What are my impressions? Write down

Step 2: How does this make me feel? What are my impressions? Write down your initial feelings and impressions. Think about those feelings. What resonated with you?

Step 3: Look at the details of the poem. Do they support your feelings

Step 3: Look at the details of the poem. Do they support your feelings and impressions? Look at the details. Does it support how you feel? Go deeper. Can you identify other feelings that either contradict or support your initial impression. Do you have other feelings now? If so, why?

More on Step 3: The Form Every piece of a poem is a clue

More on Step 3: The Form Every piece of a poem is a clue to it’s meaning, and we must consider it. Some questions you might ask yourself are: What kind of poem is this? What is the rhyme scheme (is there one? ) The meter? What poetical devices does the poet use? Hyperbole? Onomatopoeia? Alliteration? Personification? Are there metaphors or similes present? WHAT IS THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THIS?

IMPORTANT! Remember! Most poetry is open to interpretation. There is usually more than one

IMPORTANT! Remember! Most poetry is open to interpretation. There is usually more than one way to take it. As long as you can find textual support (words, phrases, or lines from the poem) that backs up your impression of it, you have a valid interpretation. This does not mean every interpretation is correct. You must be able to back yours up with evidence from the poem. The more evidence you find, the stronger your interpretation is!