Poetry personal assessment Must you must be able

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Poetry - personal assessment Must - you must be able to understand copy these

Poetry - personal assessment Must - you must be able to understand copy these techniques. Should - you should be able to understand copy these techniques. Could - you could show your understanding and ability to copy these techniques.

Show the poetic techniques you have understood. (You must have evidence on your individual

Show the poetic techniques you have understood. (You must have evidence on your individual slides). Poetic technique Date (dd/mm) Teacher checked assonance ballad enjambment acrostic imagery alliteration metaphor haiku ode limerick onomatopoeia rhyme repetition rhythm caesura simile couplet stanza personification

Example: Acrostic Happy right off the BBQ Always best with bacon Mustard is mighty

Example: Acrostic Happy right off the BBQ Always best with bacon Mustard is mighty nice Explanation: BACON! A poem in which the first letter of each line spells out a word, name, or phrase when read vertically. Usually cheese makes it better Relish makes me gag Great with fresh cooked fries Everyone loves bacon! Really I just want bacon! Hamburger - Anonymous

Acrostic Write your own: Explain your choices:

Acrostic Write your own: Explain your choices:

Alliteration Explanation: The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words

Alliteration Explanation: The repetition of initial stressed, consonant sounds in a series of words within a phrase or verse line. Example: Without the A, you couldn’t aim an arrow in the air. You wouldn’t ask for apricots or almonds at a fair. Aruba and Australia would be missing from a map. The letter A - Darren Sardelli

Alliteration Write your own: Explain your choices:

Alliteration Write your own: Explain your choices:

Assonance Example Explanation: The repetition of vowel sounds without repeating consonants; sometimes called vowel

Assonance Example Explanation: The repetition of vowel sounds without repeating consonants; sometimes called vowel rhyme. The rain in Spain falls mainly in the plains.

Assonance Write your own: Explain your choices:

Assonance Write your own: Explain your choices:

Ballad Explanation: A popular narrative song passed down orally. In the English tradition, it

Ballad Explanation: A popular narrative song passed down orally. In the English tradition, it usually follows a form of rhymed (abcb) Example: "Tell us a story Grandad" The bunny rabbits implored "About the block of concrete Out of which you clawed. " Tell every gory detail Of how you struggled free From the teeth of the iron monster And swam through a quicksand sea. " Rabbit in the Mixer - Roger Mc. Gough

Ballad Write your own: Explain your choices:

Ballad Write your own: Explain your choices:

Caesura Explanation: A stop or pause in a line, often marked by a punctuation

Caesura Explanation: A stop or pause in a line, often marked by a punctuation mark such as a comma, semi-colon or exclamation mark! Example Dead ! One of them shot by the sea in the east, And one of them shot in the west by the sea. Dead ! both my boys ! When you sit at the feast And are wanting a great song for Italy free, Let none look at me ! Mother and Poet - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Caesura Write your own: Explain your choices:

Caesura Write your own: Explain your choices:

Couplet Example: Explanation: Parting is such sweet sorrow A pair of successive rhyming lines,

Couplet Example: Explanation: Parting is such sweet sorrow A pair of successive rhyming lines, usually of the same length. That I shall say good night till it be morrow. Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare

Couplet Write your own: Explain your choices:

Couplet Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example: Enjambment Explanation: The running-over of a sentence or phrase from one poetic line

Example: Enjambment Explanation: The running-over of a sentence or phrase from one poetic line to the next, with punctuation at the end of the line. the back wings of the hospital where nothing will grow lie cinders in which shine the broken pieces of a green Bottle Between Walls - William Carlos Williams

Enjambment Write your own: Explain your choices:

Enjambment Write your own: Explain your choices:

Haiku Explanation: A Japanese poem made up of three unrhymed lines of five, seven,

Haiku Explanation: A Japanese poem made up of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Example: On a branch floating downriver a cricket, singing. Kobayashi Issa, translated by Jane Hirshfield A haiku often features an image, or a pair of images, meant to capture a specific moment in time.

Haiku Write your own: Explain your choices:

Haiku Write your own: Explain your choices:

Imagery Explanation: Elements of a poem that use any of the five senses to

Imagery Explanation: Elements of a poem that use any of the five senses to create a set of mental images. Example: The winter evening settles down With smell of steaks in passageways. Six o’clock. The burnt-out ends of smoky days. Preludes - T. S. Eliot

Imagery Write your own: Explain your choices:

Imagery Write your own: Explain your choices:

Limerick Explanation: A fixed light-verse form of five generally anapestic lines rhyming AABBA. They

Limerick Explanation: A fixed light-verse form of five generally anapestic lines rhyming AABBA. They are usually funny. Example: There was a young lady of Lynn, Who was so uncommonly thin That when she essayed To drink lemonade She slipped through the straw and fell in. Anonymous

Limerick Write your own: Explain your choices:

Limerick Write your own: Explain your choices:

Metaphor Example: Explanation: The promise between us was a delicate flower. A comparison that

Metaphor Example: Explanation: The promise between us was a delicate flower. A comparison that is made without pointing out a similarity by using words such as “like, ” “as, ” or “than. ” Kathy arrived at the grocery store with an army of children.

Metaphor Write your own: Explain your choices:

Metaphor Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Ode Explanation: A formal, often ceremonious lyric poem that addresses and often celebrates

Example Ode Explanation: A formal, often ceremonious lyric poem that addresses and often celebrates a person, place, thing, or idea. Its stanza forms vary. I love the sound of marbles scattered on the worn wooden floor, like children running away in a game of hideand-seek. I love the sight of white marbles, blue marbles, green marbles, black, new marbles, old marbles, iridescent marbles, with glass-ribboned swirls, dancing round and round. I love the feel of marbles, cool, smooth, rolling freely in my palm, like smooth-sided stars that light up the worn world. Ode to Marbles - Max Mendelsohn

Ode Write your own: Explain your choices:

Ode Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Onomatopoeia Explanation: A figure of speech in which the sound of a word

Example Onomatopoeia Explanation: A figure of speech in which the sound of a word imitates its sense (for example, “choo-choo, ” “hiss, ” or “buzz”). Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me; Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings. Piano - D. H. Lawrence

Onomatopoeia Write your own: Explain your choices:

Onomatopoeia Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Personification Explanation: A figure of speech in which the poet describes an abstraction,

Example Personification Explanation: A figure of speech in which the poet describes an abstraction, a thing, or a nonhuman form as if it were a person. O Rose thou art sick. The invisible worm, That flies in the night In the howling storm: Has found out thy bed Of crimson joy: And his dark secret love Does thy life destroy. The sick rose - William Blake

Personification Write your own: Explain your choices:

Personification Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Repetition/Refrain Explanation: A phrase or line repeated at intervals within a poem, especially

Example Repetition/Refrain Explanation: A phrase or line repeated at intervals within a poem, especially at the end of a stanza. How she let her long hair down over her shoulders, making a love cave around her face. Return and return again. How when the lamplight was lowered she pressed against him, twining her fingers in his. Return and return again. How their legs swam together like dolphins and their toes played like little tunnies. Return and return again. How she sat beside him cross-legged, telling him stories of her childhood. Return and return again. O best of all nights, return and return again - James Laughlin

Repetition/Refrain Write your own: Explain your choices:

Repetition/Refrain Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Rhyme And here on this turning of the stair Between passion and doubt,

Example Rhyme And here on this turning of the stair Between passion and doubt, Explanation: The repetition of syllables, typically at the end of a verse line. I pause and say a double prayer, One for you, and one for you; And so they cancel out. Midstairs - Virginia Hamilton Adair

Rhyme Write your own: Explain your choices:

Rhyme Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Rhythm Explanation: An audible pattern in verse established by the intervals between stressed

Example Rhythm Explanation: An audible pattern in verse established by the intervals between stressed syllables.

Rhythm Write your own: Explain your choices:

Rhythm Write your own: Explain your choices:

Simile Explanation: A comparison made with “as, ” “like, ” or “than. ” Example

Simile Explanation: A comparison made with “as, ” “like, ” or “than. ” Example O my Luve is like a red, red rose That’s newly sprung in June; O my Luve is like the melody That’s sweetly played in tune. A Red, Red Rose - Robert Burns

Simile Write your own: Explain your choices:

Simile Write your own: Explain your choices:

Example Stanza Explanation: Stanza 1 A grouping of lines separated from others in a

Example Stanza Explanation: Stanza 1 A grouping of lines separated from others in a poem. Stanza 2 Stanza 3 Stanza 4

Stanza Write your own: Explain your choices:

Stanza Write your own: Explain your choices:

Reflection - explain how you found the tasks. How do you think you did

Reflection - explain how you found the tasks. How do you think you did overall? (100 to 200 words) Rate your creativity on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 - what’s creativity? 10 - I’m the next Shakespeare!) 1 I found. . . 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10