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Please log in to Ci 3 T. org … Professional Learning

Please log in to Ci 3 T. org … Professional Learning

Supporting Behavior for School Success: Teacher-Level Strategies to Manage Behavior and Support Instruction May

Supporting Behavior for School Success: Teacher-Level Strategies to Manage Behavior and Support Instruction May 24, 2016 Schenectady, NY Kathleen Lynne Lane, Ph. D. , BCBA-D

Agenda 1. Frame the use of low intensity strategies for increasing student engagement within

Agenda 1. Frame the use of low intensity strategies for increasing student engagement within a Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-tiered (CI 3 T) model of prevention. 2. Learn about three research-based strategies to improve academic engagement: 1. incorporating choice into instruction 2. increasing opportunities to respond 3. Using precorrections 3. Discuss importance of implementing these low-intensity strategies with integrity and monitoring changes in student performance, with attention to issues of social validity.

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk ≈ Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) ≈ Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk PBIS Framework Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Validated Curricula ≈ Primary Prevention (Tier 1) Academic Behavioral Social 2014 -2015 CI 3 T Training Project 4

Primary Intervention Plan Statement Purpose Statement School-Wide Expectations 1. 2. 3. Area I: Academics

Primary Intervention Plan Statement Purpose Statement School-Wide Expectations 1. 2. 3. Area I: Academics Responsibilities Students will: *see Expectation Matrix Area II: Behavior Responsibilities Students will: Area III: Social Skills Responsibilities Students will: Faculty and Staff will: Parents will: Administrators will: Lane & Oakes 2012

Dis tric Hig t h Q Stan & St ua dar ate lity ds

Dis tric Hig t h Q Stan & St ua dar ate lity ds Ins tru cti on Po Int sitiv e e Su rven Beh pp a ort tions vior s ( an PB d IS)

What do I need to know? Sunflower Elementary

What do I need to know? Sunflower Elementary

Procedures for Teaching Faculty and Staff: Students: Parents/ Community: https: //youtu. be/b 4 swsa_kn.

Procedures for Teaching Faculty and Staff: Students: Parents/ Community: https: //youtu. be/b 4 swsa_kn. YE Lane & Oakes 2012

Procedures for Reinforcing Faculty and Staff: Students: Parents/ Community: Do Cou 1 bo n

Procedures for Reinforcing Faculty and Staff: Students: Parents/ Community: Do Cou 1 bo n atio pon x of n for Mac to C omm aroni : and unit Chee y Fo od D se Laneriv &e. Oakes 2012

Ticket Examples

Ticket Examples

Reactive Plan

Reactive Plan

Essential Components of Primary Prevention Efforts Social Validity Treatment Integrity Systematic Screening Academic Behavior

Essential Components of Primary Prevention Efforts Social Validity Treatment Integrity Systematic Screening Academic Behavior

See Lane, Menzies, Oakes, and Kalberg (2012) WHAT SCREENING TOOLS ARE AVAILABLE? Lane &

See Lane, Menzies, Oakes, and Kalberg (2012) WHAT SCREENING TOOLS ARE AVAILABLE? Lane & Oakes

Student Risk Screening Scale (Drummond, 1994) The SRSS is 7 -item mass screener used

Student Risk Screening Scale (Drummond, 1994) The SRSS is 7 -item mass screener used to identify students who are at risk for antisocial behavior. Uses 4 -point Likert-type scale: never = 0, occasionally = 1, sometimes = 2, frequently = 3 Teachers evaluate each student on the following items - Steal - Low Academic Achievement - Lie, Cheat, Sneak - Negative Attitude - Behavior Problems - Aggressive Behavior - Peer Rejection Student Risk is divided into 3 categories Low 0 – 3 Moderate 4 – 8 High 9 – 21 (SRSS; Drummond, 1994)

STUDENT RISK SCREENING SCALE-IE Anxious Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior Lonely Aggressive Behavior Sad; Depressed Shy; Withdrawn

STUDENT RISK SCREENING SCALE-IE Anxious Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior Lonely Aggressive Behavior Sad; Depressed Shy; Withdrawn Emotionally Flat Negative Attitude Low Academic Achievement Peer Rejection 0 = Never Behavior Problem TEACHER NAME 2 = Sometimes Use the above scale to rate each item for each student. Steal Student Name Lie, Cheat, Sneak 3 = Frequently Original SRSS-IE 14 12 items retained for use at the elementary level 14 items under development in middle and high schools (Lane, Oakes, Harris, Menzies, Cox, & Lambert, 2012) Self-Inflicts Pain 1 = Occasionally

How do we score and interpret the SRSS-IE at the Elementary Level? 1. All

How do we score and interpret the SRSS-IE at the Elementary Level? 1. All scores will be automatically calculated. 2. SRSS scores are the sum of items 1 – 7 (range 0 – 21) 3. Internalizing scores are the sum of items 8 -12 (range 0 -15)

Sample Elementary School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS-E 7 Results – All

Sample Elementary School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS-E 7 Results – All Students 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% N = 25 4. 56% 6. 93% N = 86 9. 97% 23. 82% N = 250 N = 35 N = 300 85. 47% 69. 25% School F 14 N = 16 School F 15 Time School Screening Point. F 16 Low Risk (0 -3) Moderate (4 -8) School F 17 High (9 -21)

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-E 7 Comparison by Grade Level K 1

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-E 7 Comparison by Grade Level K 1 st 2 nd N Screened Low (0 -3) Moderate (4 -8) High (9 -21) 65 54 (83. 08%) 7 (10. 77%) 4 (6. 15%) 53 45 (84. 91%) 3 (5. 66%) 5 (9. 43%) 46 31 (67. 39%) 8 (17. 39%) 7 (15. 22%)

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-E 7 Comparison by Grade Level 3 rd

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-E 7 Comparison by Grade Level 3 rd 4 th 5 th N Screened Low (0 -3) Moderate (4 -8) High (9 -21) 68 64 (94. 12%) 4 (5. 88%) 0 (0%) 57 52 (91. 23%) 5 (8. 77%) 0 (0%) 62 54 (87. 10%) 8 (12. 90%) 0 (0%)

Sample Elementary School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS-I 5 Results – All

Sample Elementary School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS-I 5 Results – All Students 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% N = 72 N = 19 5. 41% 19. 94% N = 85 12. 25% N = 43 23. 55% N = 204 N = 289 82. 34% 56. 51% School F 14 School F 15 Time School Screening Point. F 16 Low Risk (0 -1) Moderate (2 -3) School F 17 High (4 -15)

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-I 5 Comparison by Grade Level 3 rd

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-I 5 Comparison by Grade Level 3 rd 4 th 5 th N Screened Low (0 -1) Moderate (2 -3) High (4 -15) 68 60 (88. 24%) 6 (8. 82%) 2 (2. 94%) 57 51 (89. 47%) 5 (8. 77%) 1 (1. 75%) 62 53 (85. 48%) 8 (12. 90%) 1 (1. 61%)

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-I 5 Comparison by Grade Level K 1

Sample Elementary School … Fall 2015 SRSS-I 5 Comparison by Grade Level K 1 st 2 nd N Screened Low (0 -1) Moderate (2 -3) High (4 -15) 65 49 (75. 38%) 9 (13. 85%) 7 (10. 77%) 53 40 (75. 47%) 9 (16. 98%) 4 (7. 55%) 46 36 (78. 26%) 6 (13. 04%) 4 (8. 70%)

Sample High School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS Results – All Students

Sample High School … Fall % of Students Screened SRSS Results – All Students 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2. 42% 8. 02% N = 29 N = 96 N = 1072 89. 56% School F 15 School F 16 School F 17 School F 18 Screening Time Point N = 1197 Low Risk (0 -3) Moderate (4 -8) High (9 -21) School F 19

Sample High School … Fall 2015 SRSS Comparison by Grade Level N = 1197

Sample High School … Fall 2015 SRSS Comparison by Grade Level N = 1197 Screened Low (0 -3) Moderate (4 -8) High (9 -21) 327 287 (87. 77%) 32 (9. 79%) 8 (2. 45%) 10 th 318 271 (85. 22%) 34 (10. 69%) 13 (4. 09%) 11 th 289 264 (91. 35%) 19 (6. 57%) 6 (2. 08%) 263 250 (95. 06%) 11 (4. 18%) 2 (0. 76%) 9 th 12 th

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

Social Skills Improvement System – Performance Screening Guide Spring 2012 – Total School 100%

Social Skills Improvement System – Performance Screening Guide Spring 2012 – Total School 100% Adequate progress Moderate Difficulties 11. 04 4. 49 45. 60 N = 22 N = 54 47. 55 90% Significant Difficulties 7. 14 Percent of Students 80% 70% 60% 50% N = 35 36. 73 N = 180 N = 187 N = 212 N = 235 N = 271 55. 42 47. 96 10% 56. 12 0% Reading Skills 38. 24 N = 233 30% 43. 35 N = 31 N = 223 40% 20% 6. 34 Math Skills Prosocial Behavior Motivation to Learn n = 489 n = 490 n = 489 Subscales

Student Risk Screening Scale Middle School Fall 2004 - Fall 2011 n = 12

Student Risk Screening Scale Middle School Fall 2004 - Fall 2011 n = 12 Percentage of Students n = 20 n = 507 N=534 N=502 N=454 N=470 N=477 Fall Screeners N=476 N=524 N= 539 Lane & Oakes

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

Examining Academic and Behavioral Data: Elementary Level Lane, K. L. , Menzies, H. M.

Examining Academic and Behavioral Data: Elementary Level Lane, K. L. , Menzies, H. M. , Ennis, R. P. , & Oakes, W. P. (2015). Supporting Behavior for School Success: A Step-by-Step Guide to Key Strategies. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Teacher-Level Considerations 1. Instructional Considerations 2. General Classroom Management 3. Low-intensity Strategies

Teacher-Level Considerations 1. Instructional Considerations 2. General Classroom Management 3. Low-intensity Strategies

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High p Requests Precorrection Incorporating Choice Behavior Contracts

Monitoring Progress Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What do Integrity: Is it stakeholders happening?

Monitoring Progress Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What do Integrity: Is it stakeholders happening? think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Experimental Design How well did this support work for this student? 2014 -2015 CI 3 T Training Project 38

Building Your Toolbox 1. Increasing opportunities to respond 2. Incorporating choice into instruction 3.

Building Your Toolbox 1. Increasing opportunities to respond 2. Incorporating choice into instruction 3. Using precorrections

Ci 3 T. org

Ci 3 T. org

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High p Requests Precorrection Incorporating Choice Behavior Contracts

A Look at Instructional Choice

A Look at Instructional Choice

Agenda • What is instructional choice? • Why is instructional choice effective? • What

Agenda • What is instructional choice? • Why is instructional choice effective? • What does the supporting research for instructional choice say? • What are the benefits and challenges? • How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success • How well is it working? Examining the Effects 43

What is instructional choice? • Instructional Choice – “…opportunities to make choices means that

What is instructional choice? • Instructional Choice – “…opportunities to make choices means that the student is provided with two or more options, is allowed to independently select an option, and is provided with the selected option" (Jolivette, Stichter, & Mc. Cormick, 2002, p. 28). • Types of instructional choices (Rispoli et al. , 2013) – Across-activity choices – Within-activities choices

Examples Across-task Choices Within-task Choices • Paper, presentation, or Youtube video to show me

Examples Across-task Choices Within-task Choices • Paper, presentation, or Youtube video to show me what you know? • Which activity would you like to do first? • Pick a learning center? • Make your schedule for the day? • Crayons or sparkly markers? • At your desk or in the library? • In the reading corner or at your desk? • Work independently or with a partner? • Which book would you like to read? • Finish in class or at home? • Typed or handwritten? • Even or odds?

Why is instructional choice effective? • • Easy Little time Offers students control Promotes

Why is instructional choice effective? • • Easy Little time Offers students control Promotes decision making and other self-determined behaviors

What does the supporting research for instructional choice say? Engagement Disruption Self-contained classrooms (Dunlap

What does the supporting research for instructional choice say? Engagement Disruption Self-contained classrooms (Dunlap et al. , 994) Time on task Task Completion Accuracy Residential facilities (Ramsey, Jolivette, Patterson, & Kennedy, 2010) Task engagement Academic performance Inclusive Setting (Skerbetz & Kostweicz, 2013)

Supporting Research See “Instructional Choice Resource Guide” at Ci 3 t. org for additional

Supporting Research See “Instructional Choice Resource Guide” at Ci 3 t. org for additional supporting research and information.

What are the benefits & challenges? Benefits Challenges • feasible, does not require excessive

What are the benefits & challenges? Benefits Challenges • feasible, does not require excessive preparation, is easy to implement, and supports content instruction (Kern & State, 2008; Morgan, 2006; Ramsey et al. , 2010). • challenges in preparing independent tasks for the time provided • teaches self-determined behaviors • important to think about procedures for collecting and evaluating different types of assignments

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success ! Step

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success ! Step 1 Determine which type of choices you feel comfortable offering and create a menu of choices. Step 2 Use the menu to determine which type of choice to add to a particular lesson. Step 3 After choice is built into the lesson, offer the established choices. Step 4 Ask the student to make his or her choice.

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success ! Step

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success ! Step 5 Provide wait time for the student to select their choice. Step 6 Listen to (or observe) the student’s response Step 7 Prompt the student to make a choice from one of the available options if the student has not made a choice within the time allotted. Step 8 Reinforce the student’s choice, providing them with the option they selected.

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success! Step 9

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? Checklist for Success! Step 9 Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on the choice they selected.

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What do Integrity: Is it stakeholders happening? think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Experimental Design How well did this support work for this student?

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? • Step 1: Determine which

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? • Step 1: Determine which type of choices you feel comfortable offering students in your classroom and create a menu of choices. – Consider within activity or across activity choices. • Step 2: Use the menu to determine which type of choices to add to a particular lesson. • Step 3: After choice is built into the lesson, offer the established choices. • Step 4: Ask the student to make his or her choice. See “Instructional Choice Implementation Checklist” at Ci 3 t. org

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? • Step 5: Provide wait

How do I implement instructional choice in my classroom? • Step 5: Provide wait time for the student to select their choice. • Step 6: Listen to (or observe) the student’s response. • Step 7: Prompt the student to make a choice from one of the available options if the student has not made a choice within the time allotted. • Step 8: Reinforce the student’s choice, providing them with the option they selected. • Step 9: Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on the choice they selected.

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Is it

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Is it What do happening? stakeholders think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Experimental Design How well did this support work for this student?

Making Certain the Strategy is in Place: Treatment Integrity Monitor whether instructional choice is

Making Certain the Strategy is in Place: Treatment Integrity Monitor whether instructional choice is used as intended: Treatment Integrity Checklist Example items: 1. I offered _______ the established choices. 2. I asked _______ to make their choice. 3. I provided ______ wait time to select their choice. 4. I listened or observed _______’s response. 5. I prompted _______ to make a choice from one of the available options if they had not made a choice within the time allotted. 6. I praised _______’s choice and provided them with the option selected. See “Instructional Choice Treatment Integrity Checklist” at Ci 3 t. org

What does the student think about it? See “Instructional Choice Social Validity - Student”

What does the student think about it? See “Instructional Choice Social Validity - Student” Completed by the student participating in the intervention Pre and Post Intervention

What does the teacher think about it? See “Social Validity Adapted. IRP 15 -

What does the teacher think about it? See “Social Validity Adapted. IRP 15 - Adult” Completed by the teacher/parent participating in the intervention Pre and Post intervention

(Kern, Mantegna, Vorndran, Bailin, & Hilt, 2001)

(Kern, Mantegna, Vorndran, Bailin, & Hilt, 2001)

Sample Secondary Intervention Grid (Lane, Menzies, Ennis, & Oakes, 2015)

Sample Secondary Intervention Grid (Lane, Menzies, Ennis, & Oakes, 2015)

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High

Low-Intensity Strategies Opportunities to Respond Behavior Specific Praise Active Supervision Instructional Feedback Self-monitoring High p Requests Precorrection Incorporating Choice Behavior Contracts

A Look at Increasing Opportunities to Respond

A Look at Increasing Opportunities to Respond

Agenda • • • What are opportunities to respond (OTR)? Why is OTR effective?

Agenda • • • What are opportunities to respond (OTR)? Why is OTR effective? What does the supporting research for OTR say? What are the benefits and challenges? How do I implement increased Opportunities to Respond in my classroom? Checklist for Success • How well is it working? Examining the Effects 65

What is opportunities to respond (OTR)? • Opportunities to Respond (OTR): – OTR strategy

What is opportunities to respond (OTR)? • Opportunities to Respond (OTR): – OTR strategy is designed to offer students frequent opportunities, within a set time period, to respond to teacher questions or prompts about targeted academic material – OTR can be conducted so that students respond individually or in unison

Opportunities to Respond (OTRs) Providing students with a high number of opportunities to answer

Opportunities to Respond (OTRs) Providing students with a high number of opportunities to answer or actively respond to academic requests promotes good behavior in students with even the most resistant behavior problems. Teachers Presents: • instructional information • ask questions • provide wait time • prompt when necessary • cue • provide feedback Students Responses can be: • verbal • written • signal • choral

Examples Verbal Responding Non-Verbal Responding • Coral Response (Haydon • et al. , 2009)

Examples Verbal Responding Non-Verbal Responding • Coral Response (Haydon • et al. , 2009) – Every student answers • question/prompt • Questioning – Think, Pair, Share • – Partners • Signal – Thumbs up/down Response Card – Agree/Disagree, A/B/C/D, True/False Individual white boards Guided Notes • Student Response Systems (Clickers; Blood & Gulchak, 2013)

Opportunities to Respond (OTRs) Teacher presents instruction/demand Teacher provides feedback Cues students Fast Paced!

Opportunities to Respond (OTRs) Teacher presents instruction/demand Teacher provides feedback Cues students Fast Paced! 3 -6/min for new instruction 8 -12/min for review Wait time (prompt) Students respond

Why is increasing OTRs effective? • OTR can greatly increase active participation. • Fluency

Why is increasing OTRs effective? • OTR can greatly increase active participation. • Fluency and automaticity with the basics of any content or skill frees students to tackle complex and nuanced concepts • Teachers can quickly determine students’ proficiency with the material and to decide whether more practice is needed

What does the supporting research for OTR say? Increased Opportunities to Respond • Decreasing

What does the supporting research for OTR say? Increased Opportunities to Respond • Decreasing Disruptive Behavior in an Elementary Self-Contained Classroom (Haydon, Mancil, & Van Loan, 2009) • Improving Academic Outcomes for Students with Behavior Disorders (Sutherland, Alder, & Gunter, 2003) • Using Choral Responding to Increase Student Participation (Haydon & Hunter, 2011) 2014 -2015 STL CI 3 T Training Project 71

Haydon, Mancil, and Van Loan (2009) Rate of OTR per Minute Rate of Disruptions/Correct

Haydon, Mancil, and Van Loan (2009) Rate of OTR per Minute Rate of Disruptions/Correct Responses Rate of disruptive behavior Rate of correct responses (Haydon, Mancil, & Van Loan 2009)

What are the benefits and challenges? Benefits Challenges • efficient, • engaging • facilitates

What are the benefits and challenges? Benefits Challenges • efficient, • engaging • facilitates participation of all students • rapid pace of instruction • initially requires advance preparation as a sufficient number of prompts or questions have to be created before beginning the lesson • shifting to a rapid pace of instruction a minimum of three opportunities to respond per min so the teacher must practice moving through a lesson quickly to ensure the pace has sufficient momentum, but not so rapid that students are lost 2014 -2015 CI 3 T Training Project 73

How do I implement increased Opportunities to Respond in my classroom? Checklist for Success

How do I implement increased Opportunities to Respond in my classroom? Checklist for Success ! Step 1 Identify the lesson content to be taught and the instructional objective. Step 2 Prepare a list of questions, prompts, or cues related to the content. Step 3 Determine the modality by which the content will be delivered. Step 4 Determine the modality by which students will respond.

How do I implement increased Opportunities to Respond in my classroom? Checklist for Success

How do I implement increased Opportunities to Respond in my classroom? Checklist for Success Step 5 ! how the format works and the Explain to students rational for using it. Step 6 Conduct the lesson with a minimum of 3 OTRs per min (single-student or unison responding). Step 7 Respond to student answers with evaluative and encouraging feedback. Step 8 Offer students an opportunity to give feedback.

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Social Validity Integrity Treatment What do Integrity: Is it stakeholders happening? think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Experimental Design How well did this support work for this student? 2014 -2015 CI 3 T Training Project 76

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Low Intensity Strategies: A Look at Precorrection

Low Intensity Strategies: A Look at Precorrection

What is a Precorrection? A Antecedent B C Behavior Consequence Identifies predictable contexts that

What is a Precorrection? A Antecedent B C Behavior Consequence Identifies predictable contexts that often result in problem behavior and provides students with supports, prompts, and reinforcement for engaging in appropriate behavior

What is a Precorrection? Managing behavior with precorrection: Managing behavior with consequences: • Anticipate

What is a Precorrection? Managing behavior with precorrection: Managing behavior with consequences: • Anticipate what activities • Requires waiting until the may cause inappropriate behavior occurs to behaviors respond • “Getting in front” of • Example: Creating an problem behaviors action plan for three alternatives to yelling at a • Example: Gentle reminder peer of expected behaviors in the hallway before dismissing for lunch vs.

Why is Precorrection Effective? Where might students currently have challenges? Precorrection: Get in front

Why is Precorrection Effective? Where might students currently have challenges? Precorrection: Get in front of problem behavior! • Manipulation of antecedents and consequences • Anticipates activities, settings, or time of day that could potentially result in problem behavior • Proactive • Focuses on what students should do instead of problem behaviors • Prevents the potential for escalating behavior patterns and allows more time for positive student-teacher interactions (Colvin et al, 1993)

Why is Precorrection Effective? • Fits seamlessly in a Ci 3 T framework –

Why is Precorrection Effective? • Fits seamlessly in a Ci 3 T framework – Proactive strategy that seeks to teach, monitor, and reinforce appropriate behavior – Used to teach behavioral expectations for common areas in the building where problem behaviors occur (e. g. lunchroom) – May be used as a Tier 2 intervention • Target a group of students

Supporting Research See “Precorrection Resource Guide” for additional supporting research and information.

Supporting Research See “Precorrection Resource Guide” for additional supporting research and information.

What are the benefits and challenges? Benefits Challenges • Making contextual • Shift in

What are the benefits and challenges? Benefits Challenges • Making contextual • Shift in thinking changes to • Need to reflect on daily activities/settings that schedule and routines traditionally occasion to anticipate when problem behaviors may • Proactive arise • Varying levels of • Must have some intensity knowledge of a given setting

How do I implement a precorrection in my classroom? Checklist for Success Step 1

How do I implement a precorrection in my classroom? Checklist for Success Step 1 Identify contexts and anticipated behaviors Step 2 Determine the expected behaviors Step 3 Adjust the environment Step 4 Provide opportunities for behavioral rehearsal

How do I implement a precorrection in my classroom? Checklist for Success Step 5

How do I implement a precorrection in my classroom? Checklist for Success Step 5 Provide strong reinforcement to students engaging in expected behaviors Step 6 Develop a prompting plan to remind students about the expected behavior Step 7 Develop a monitoring plan to determine the effectiveness of the precorrection plan Step 8 Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on this strategy

SMS Expectations Matrix

SMS Expectations Matrix

CI 3 T Ticket Examples

CI 3 T Ticket Examples

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Integrity Is it happening? Social

How well is it working? Examining the Effects Treatment Integrity Is it happening? Social Validity What do stakeholders think about the goals, procedures, and outcomes? Experimental Design How well did this support work for this student?

How do I implement precorrection in my classroom? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

How do I implement precorrection in my classroom? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Identify context and anticipated behaviors. Determine the expected behaviors. Adjust the environment. Provide opportunities for behavioral rehearsal. Provide strong reinforcement to students engaging in expected behavior. Develop a prompting plan to remind students about the expected behavior. Develop a monitoring plan to determine the effectiveness of the precorrection plan. Offer students an opportunity to give feedback on this strategy. See “Precorrection Implementation Checklist for Success”

Ensuring the Strategy is in Place: Treatment Integrity Have structures in place to monitor

Ensuring the Strategy is in Place: Treatment Integrity Have structures in place to monitor whether precorrection is carried out as intended: Treatment integrity checklist Example items: 1. Did I identify the context and determine the expected behavior? 2. Did I modify the environment to promote student success? 3. Did I provide students with an opportunity to practice the expected behavior? 4. Did I provide students with strong reinforcement for completing the expected behavior? 5. Did I prompt students to remind them to engage in the expected behavior? 6. Did I monitor student behavior? See “Precorrection Treatment Integrity Checklist”

What do students think about it? See “Precorrection Social Validity Student” Completed by the

What do students think about it? See “Precorrection Social Validity Student” Completed by the student(s) participating in the intervention at two time points: P r e a n d P o s t Intervention

What does the teacher think about it? See “Social Validity Adapted. IRP 15 Adult”

What does the teacher think about it? See “Social Validity Adapted. IRP 15 Adult” Completed by the teacher(s) and parent(s) involved in the intervention at two time points: Pre and P o s t Intervention

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Questions, thoughts, and considerations …. Let’s talk …

Ci 3 T. org

Ci 3 T. org

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for

Examining your screening data … … implications for primary prevention efforts … implications for teachers … implications for student-based interventions See Lane, Menzies, Bruhn, and Crnobori (2011)

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tiered Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk ≈ Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) ≈ Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk PBIS Framework Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Validated Curricula ≈ Primary Prevention (Tier 1) Academic Behavioral Social

Sample Secondary Intervention Grid Support Description Schoolwide Data: Entry Criteria Data to Monitor Progress

Sample Secondary Intervention Grid Support Description Schoolwide Data: Entry Criteria Data to Monitor Progress Exit Criteria mod to high risk Academic: 2 or more missing assignments with in a grading period completion, or other behavior addressed in contract Treatment Integrity Social Validity Completion of behavior contract Students who score in the abnormal range for H and CP on the SDQ; course failure or at risk on CBM Work completion and accuracy in the academic area of concern; passing grades Passing grade on the report card in the academic area of concern Sample Secondary Intervention Grid. Successful Behavior: SRSS Work Behavior Contract A written agreement between two parties used to specify the contingent relationship between the completion of a behavior and access to or delivery of a specific reward. Contract may involve administrator, teacher, parent, and student. Selfmonitoring Students will monitor and record their academic production (completion/ accuracy) and on-task behavior each day. Treatment Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies (2009). pp. 131 -Integrity 137, Boxes 6. 1 - 6. 4

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm

Comprehensive, Integrated, Three-Tier Model of Prevention (Lane, Kalberg, & Menzies, 2009) Goal: Reduce Harm Specialized Individual Systems for Students with High-Risk ≈ Tertiary Prevention (Tier 3) ≈ Secondary Prevention (Tier 2) Goal: Reverse Harm Specialized Group Systems for Students At-Risk PBIS Framework Goal: Prevent Harm School/Classroom-Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings Validated Curricula ≈ Primary Prevention (Tier 1) Academic Behavioral Social

Changes in Harry’s Behavior Baseline 1 Intervention 1 Baseline 2 100 Intervention 2 90

Changes in Harry’s Behavior Baseline 1 Intervention 1 Baseline 2 100 Intervention 2 90 Percentage of AET 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 4/27 4/28 4/29 4/30 5/5 5/10 5/13 5/14 5/17 5/18 5/19 5/20 Date of Session 5/21 5/24 5/25 5/26 5/27 5/28 Cox, M. , Griffin, M. M. , Hall, R. , Oakes, W. P. , & Lane, K. L. (2012). Using a functional assessment-based intervention to increase academic engaged time in an inclusive middle school setting. Beyond Behavior, 2, 44 – 54.

Low Intensity Strategies to Support Instruction

Low Intensity Strategies to Support Instruction

Building a CI 3 T Tier Library Teacher Delivered Strategies (T 1 T 2)

Building a CI 3 T Tier Library Teacher Delivered Strategies (T 1 T 2) Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3

Consider Teacher-Delivered Strategies Across the Tiers Opportunites to Respond High Probability Requests Behavior Specific

Consider Teacher-Delivered Strategies Across the Tiers Opportunites to Respond High Probability Requests Behavior Specific Praise Precorrection Active Supervision Instructional Choice Instructional Feedback

Connect your library to your Secondary Intervention Grid Behavior Contracts BEP (Check In/ Check

Connect your library to your Secondary Intervention Grid Behavior Contracts BEP (Check In/ Check Out) Self. Monitoring Lunch Bunch Social Skills Club Homework Club

Connect your library to your Tertiary Intervention Grid Functional Assessment-Based Interventions (FABI) Lindamood Phoneme

Connect your library to your Tertiary Intervention Grid Functional Assessment-Based Interventions (FABI) Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing

MTSS: CI 3 T Training Series Overview of Teacher focused Strategies Overview of Student

MTSS: CI 3 T Training Series Overview of Teacher focused Strategies Overview of Student Focused Strategies Using data to determine Draft the Secondary Intervention Grid based on existing supports Session 4: Revise Primary Plan using Stakeholder feedback Prepare presentation Additional Professional Development on Specific Topics tation n e m Imple f Tier 2 o Stages hin CI 3 T wit and 3 Session 6: Final revisions of CI 3 T Plan based on stakeholder feedback Draft Tertiary Prevention Intervention Grids Design Implementation Manual and Plan for roll out to faculty, students, and parents CI 3 T: Tertiary Prevention Session 5: CI 3 T: Secondary Prevention Overview of CI 3 T Prevention Models Setting a Purpose Establish team meetings and roles Session 2: Mission and Purpose Establish Roles and Responsibilities Procedures for Teaching Procedures for Reinforcing Reactive Plan Session 3: Procedures for Monitoring CI 3 T: Primary Prevention CI 3 T Team Training Sequence Session 1: Core Content Curriculum Check In - Check Out Functional Assessmentbased Interventions Reading, Math, Writing Benchmarking and Progress Monitoring Tools Student Driven Interventions, Strategies, & Practices Additional Tier 3 Supports Teacher Drive Supports: Instructional Techniques to Improve Students’ Motivation; General Classroom Management Practices; Low Intensity Behavior Supports

Ci 3 T. org Ci 3 t. org Professional Learning Resources: Overview Presentation Intervention

Ci 3 T. org Ci 3 t. org Professional Learning Resources: Overview Presentation Intervention Grid Implementation checklist Treatment integrity checklist Social validity surveys Resource guide Examples

Moving Forward … thank you! Kathleen. Lane@ku. edu Learning outcomes: Participants will learn about

Moving Forward … thank you! Kathleen. [email protected] edu Learning outcomes: Participants will learn about three low intensity, teacher-delivered strategies