Place Powerful Knowledge and Powerful Pedagogies Lauren Hammond

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Place, Powerful Knowledge, and Powerful Pedagogies… Lauren Hammond L. Hammond@ioe. ac. uk 23 rd

Place, Powerful Knowledge, and Powerful Pedagogies… Lauren Hammond L. [email protected] ac. uk 23 rd January 2016

What’s the link between place, Powerful Knowledge, and Powerful Pedagogies? ‘All knowledge is inescapably

What’s the link between place, Powerful Knowledge, and Powerful Pedagogies? ‘All knowledge is inescapably a human product that is developed by people in every period of history and in every society to make sense of the world they experience. At the same time , knowledge is progressive; in very different ways in different fields from science to the humanities, it changes and develops’ Young (2014, page 15)

1 Place as threshold concept in enabling students to think geographically 2 How has

1 Place as threshold concept in enabling students to think geographically 2 How has place been represented in the geography curriculum, and what impacts has this had? 3 How is ‘place’ conceptualised in the discipline of geography? 4 How can we support students in learning about place?

Why place? Lambert (2015) identifies ‘thinking geographically’ – integrating place, space and environment with

Why place? Lambert (2015) identifies ‘thinking geographically’ – integrating place, space and environment with a sense of the global’ as a threshold concept in the education of geography teachers.

‘Concepts can be seen as link between the school and academic discipline’ Brooks (2013,

‘Concepts can be seen as link between the school and academic discipline’ Brooks (2013, page 82) (The fundamental question of ‘what shall we teach? ’) ‘is not answered by the “national curriculum”, and is only partially answered by an examination specification or syllabus – or even a text book. ’ Lambert and Biddulph (2015, page 214) ‘It is important to grasp that at the practical heart of curriculum making is a progressive conception of subject knowledge. This is in line with what young and Muller (2010) have referred to as “Future 3” (F 3) knowledge’ Lambert and Biddulph (2015, page 216)

How has place been constructed and explored in the curriculum? What are the (potential)

How has place been constructed and explored in the curriculum? What are the (potential) impacts of this? QCA, 2007 Socio-political space of education

Place in the curriculum – 2014 changes… Df. E, 2013

Place in the curriculum – 2014 changes… Df. E, 2013

Slide taken from Roberts (2013) Debate with Michael Young

Slide taken from Roberts (2013) Debate with Michael Young

‘Thinking geographically’ – integrating place, space and environment with a sense of the global’

‘Thinking geographically’ – integrating place, space and environment with a sense of the global’ Lambert (2015) *What powerful geographical knowledge students need to develop as geographers? *How that knowledge about place created and tested, and how we support students in developing their knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to this?

Relationship to space and time (Lefebvre) Geographical imagination -How we imagine the world -How

Relationship to space and time (Lefebvre) Geographical imagination -How we imagine the world -How we represent it to others (Balderstone) Place is a construct which ‘always exists between objective fact and subjective place’ Cresswell (2008, page 115) Consideration of individual and disciplinary imaginations and representations. The construction of place Lambert and Morgan (2010), quote Harvey and question ‘by what social process is place constructed? ’ Place and becoming a geographer (some considerations) Young People’s Geographies (Biddulph and Firth) -’Whose place’ -Personal and experiential geographies (e. g. fear) Physical processes that construct place

Thank you for listening! Any questions, comments, or suggestions? Lauren Hammond L. Hammond@ioe. ac.

Thank you for listening! Any questions, comments, or suggestions? Lauren Hammond L. [email protected] ac. uk 23 rd January 2016

Bibliography *Balderstone, D. (2006) ‘What’s the point of learning geography? ’ In Secondary geography

Bibliography *Balderstone, D. (2006) ‘What’s the point of learning geography? ’ In Secondary geography Handbook (Balderstone eds) Geographical Association: Sheffield *Brooks, C. (2013) ‘How do we Understand Conceptual Development in School Geography? ’ in Lambert, D. Jones, M. (eds) Debates in Geography Education Routledge Abingdon *Cresswell, T. (1996) In Place / Out of Place: Geography, Ideology and Transgression University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis *Cresswell, T. (2008) ‘Place: Encountering Geography as Philosophy’ in Geography 93(3) pages 132 – 139 *Lambert, D. Morgan, J. (2010) Teaching Geography 11 -18: A Conceptual Approach Open University Press: Maidenhead *Lambert, D. Biddulph, M. (2014) ‘The Dialogic Space Offered by Curriculum-Making in the Process of Learning to Teach, and the Creation of a Progressive Knowledge-led Curriculum in Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education *Lambert, D. (2015) unpublished GER paper Learning to Teach Geography: the Threshold Concepts *Lefebvre, H. (1992) Critique of Everyday Life Verso: London *Meyer, J. Land, R. Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge: Linkages to Ways of Thinking and Practicing within the Disciplines available at: http: //www. etl. tla. ed. ac. uk//docs/ETLreport 4. pdf (accessed 17/01/2016) *Roberts, M. Young, M. ‘Powerful Knowledge and Geography Debate’ available at : https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Dy. Gwb. Pmim 7 o (accessed on 03/11/2014) *Young, M. Muller, J. (201) ‘Three Educational Scenarios for the Future: Lessons from the Sociology of Knowledge’ in ‘European Journal of Education 45(1) pages 11 -27 *Young, M. Lambert, D. Roberts, C. Roberts, M. (2014) Knowledge and the Future School: Curriculum and Social Justice Bloomsbury Academic: London *Young People’s Geographies Project available at: http: //www. young-peoples-geographies. co. uk (accessed 17/01/2016)