Physics I Class 18 Coulombs Law 1 Forces

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Physics I Class 18 Coulomb’s Law 1

Physics I Class 18 Coulomb’s Law 1

Forces Known to Physics (Review) 2

Forces Known to Physics (Review) 2

A New Property of Matter Charge 3

A New Property of Matter Charge 3

Conservation of Charge 4

Conservation of Charge 4

Coulomb - A Man, A Unit, A Law 5

Coulomb - A Man, A Unit, A Law 5

Coulomb’s Law of Electrostatic Force 6

Coulomb’s Law of Electrostatic Force 6

Direction of Electrostatic Force “Opposites Attract” 7

Direction of Electrostatic Force “Opposites Attract” 7

Properties of Electrostatic Force Similarities with Gravity 8

Properties of Electrostatic Force Similarities with Gravity 8

Properties of Electrostatic Force Differences with Gravity 9

Properties of Electrostatic Force Differences with Gravity 9

Comparison of Gravity and Electrostatic Force 10

Comparison of Gravity and Electrostatic Force 10

Superposition of Electrostatic Forces 11

Superposition of Electrostatic Forces 11

Two Ways of Calculating the Electric Force Vector 12

Two Ways of Calculating the Electric Force Vector 12

Class #18 Take-Away Concepts 13

Class #18 Take-Away Concepts 13

Class #18 Problems of the Day 14

Class #18 Problems of the Day 14

Class #18 Problems of the Day 15

Class #18 Problems of the Day 15

Activity #18 Coulomb’s Law 16

Activity #18 Coulomb’s Law 16

Class #18 Optional Material A Prof. B’s Method of Calculation 17

Class #18 Optional Material A Prof. B’s Method of Calculation 17

How to Calculate a General Unit Direction Vector A “unit vector” is a special

How to Calculate a General Unit Direction Vector A “unit vector” is a special vector with dimensionless length of one unit. 18

How to Calculate the Electric Force Vector (Prof. B’s Method) 19

How to Calculate the Electric Force Vector (Prof. B’s Method) 19

Class #18 Optional Material B “Three Quarks for Muster Mark” 20

Class #18 Optional Material B “Three Quarks for Muster Mark” 20

“Elementary” Particles An Embarrassment of Riches Beginning with the discovery of the electron in

“Elementary” Particles An Embarrassment of Riches Beginning with the discovery of the electron in 1898, physicists encountered an increasing array of so-called “elementary” particles. It became evident to physicists in the 1960’s that these particles must themselves be combinations of deeper fundamental particles. Joseph F. Alward, Ph. D Department of Physics University of the Pacific 21

The Origin of Quark Theory 1929 - Murray Gell-Mann took the name quark from

The Origin of Quark Theory 1929 - Murray Gell-Mann took the name quark from "Three quarks for muster Mark", in James Joyce's book Finnegan's Wake. (1963) (Nobel Prize 1969) In the early 1960’s, Gell-Mann and others proposed the Quark Theory to explain the “elementary” particles and their interactions in terms of 3 deeper fundamental particles called quarks. Further developments have shown there actually 6 different quarks and their corresponding anti-quarks. The quarks and their properties have been given whimsical names like “charm” that have no physical significance. 22

6 Quark Building Blocks Quarks Anti-Bottom 23

6 Quark Building Blocks Quarks Anti-Bottom 23