Physical Health Nutrition Intro to Wellness Medway High

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Physical Health: Nutrition Intro to Wellness Medway High School

Physical Health: Nutrition Intro to Wellness Medway High School

What is nutrition? The science that studies food and how food nourishes our bodies

What is nutrition? The science that studies food and how food nourishes our bodies and influences our health

Nutrients Substances in food that your body needs for energy, proper growth, body maintenance,

Nutrients Substances in food that your body needs for energy, proper growth, body maintenance, and functioning. Six classes of nutrients: Carbohydrates Proteins Fats Vitamins Minerals Water

Carbohydrates The starches and sugars found in food. The body’s chief source of energy.

Carbohydrates The starches and sugars found in food. The body’s chief source of energy. 1 gram of carbohydrates = 4 calories. Between 45 – 65 % of your daily calories. Sources?

Proteins Nutrients that help build, maintain, & repair body tissues. 1 gram of protein

Proteins Nutrients that help build, maintain, & repair body tissues. 1 gram of protein = 4 calories. Between 10 -35% of your daily calories. Sources?

Fats Supply a concentrated form of energy and help transport other nutrients to locations

Fats Supply a concentrated form of energy and help transport other nutrients to locations in the body where they are needed. Good Fat vs. Bad Fat 1 gram of fats = 9 calories. Between 20 – 30% of daily calories. Sources?

Influences on Your Food Choices Hunger Appetite Culture Family & friends Emotions Convenience &

Influences on Your Food Choices Hunger Appetite Culture Family & friends Emotions Convenience & cost Advertising

Calories The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of

Calories The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water by 1 degree Celcius. The amount of energy in food. Caloric intake depends on gender, age, and level of daily activity. 2800 Calories 2200 Calories 1600 Calories Active Male Teenagers Active Female Teenagers Inactive Teenagers

Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) The energy the body uses to maintain bodily functions 60

Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) The energy the body uses to maintain bodily functions 60 – 70% of daily energy output is used for daily functions Regular cardio exercise can increase your BMR Increasing % muscle will increase BMR Age can decrease your BMR Depriving yourself of food to try to lose weight decreases your BMR An average person can burn between 1200 – 1500 calories a day just going through everyday life

The Energy Balance Equation Energy input = calories from food Energy output = BMR

The Energy Balance Equation Energy input = calories from food Energy output = BMR + physical activity Energy stored = Energy input – energy output It takes 3500 calories to make 1 pound of stored fat If you eat an extra 350 calories a day, in one month your could gain 3 pounds Calories in = Calories out: Maintain Calories in > Calories out: Gain weight Calories in < Calories out: Lose weight

Body Fat Ranges Body Mass Index: a measuring system used to estimate the amount

Body Fat Ranges Body Mass Index: a measuring system used to estimate the amount of body fat a person has calculated from a person’s weight and height Overweight & Obese: Ranges of weight that are greater than what is generally considered healthy for a given height The terms also identify ranges of weight that have been shown to increase the likelihood of certain diseases and other health problems. Massachusetts has one of the lowest obesity rates in the nation at 22. 9 percent, yet almost 1. 2 million adults are obese in the state

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% ≥ 20%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% ≥ 20%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% ≥ 20%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% ≥ 20%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% ≥ 25%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% ≥ 25%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% ≥ 25%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% ≥ 25%

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2010 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 2010 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 29% ≥ 30% 10%– 14% 15%– 19% 20%– 24% 25%–

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30

Obesity Trends* Among U. S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%– 14%

Fast Food Field Trip With your partner: Choose a restaurant and select an entrée,

Fast Food Field Trip With your partner: Choose a restaurant and select an entrée, side, & beverage. Have a dessert, too! Review the calories, fat, saturated fat, protein, fiber, sodium Do you consider your choice to be a healthy meal? Males Females Calories 2200 -2400 2000 Proteins (g) 52 46 Fat (g) 61 – 85 55 – 78 Saturated Fat (g) 20 20 Sodium (mg) 1500 - 2300 Dietary Fiber (g) 31 – 34 23 Carbohydrates (g) 269 - 374 225 - 325

Too much…Sodium? Disrupts the fluid balance in your body by making you retain water

Too much…Sodium? Disrupts the fluid balance in your body by making you retain water for a period of time. BLOATING! As sodium intakes increase, average blood pressure rises. As blood pressure rises, the risk of death from cardiovascular disease climbs steadily. The daily recommended allowance for sodium is not more than 2300 mg/day

Too much…Sugar? Insatiable Hunger - Leptin resistance Weight Gain Insulin resistance Diabetes The recommended

Too much…Sugar? Insatiable Hunger - Leptin resistance Weight Gain Insulin resistance Diabetes The recommended level of sugar intake in a day is not more than 25 grams.

This is your brain on …SUGAR!

This is your brain on …SUGAR!

Too much…Saturated Fat? Eating too much saturated fat is one of the major risk

Too much…Saturated Fat? Eating too much saturated fat is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. A diet high in saturated fat causes a soft, waxy substance called cholesterol to build up in the arteries. Too much fat also increases the risk of heart disease because of its high calorie content, which increases the chance of becoming obese. The daily recommended allowance is not more than 6% of your daily calories – if you eat 2000 calories a day, that is no more than 13 grams

Calorie King http: //www. calorieking. com/

Calorie King http: //www. calorieking. com/

Homework Bring in the nutritional label from your favorite snack food

Homework Bring in the nutritional label from your favorite snack food