Part IV Facilitating Reviews Transitions Module IVA Reviews

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Part IV Facilitating Reviews & Transitions

Part IV Facilitating Reviews & Transitions

Module IVA: Reviews

Module IVA: Reviews

Rationale for This Module The IFSP is the instrument specified by the Infant. Toddler

Rationale for This Module The IFSP is the instrument specified by the Infant. Toddler Program for implementing services for eligible infants and toddlers and their families. It is both a process and a written document. This document provides written documentation of desired outcomes, services, strategies to meet outcomes, and the results of intervention efforts. To this end, the IFSP must be reviewed at least every six months from the date of the initial IFSP. This module focuses on planning and conducting IFSP review meetings, and is recorded in Section IX of the IFSP document. 284

After completing this module, the learner will be able to… 1. 2. 3. 4.

After completing this module, the learner will be able to… 1. 2. 3. 4. Describe best practices for planning and conducting the IFSP Review Meeting. Identify three kinds of IFSP reviews. Summarize review results. Write family- and priority-driven IFSP reviews that are meaningful to children and their families. 285

IFSP Section IX This section is to be used anytime there is an IFSP

IFSP Section IX This section is to be used anytime there is an IFSP review. It is not necessary to wait until a semi-annual or annual review to review the plan and make changes that are needed or desired by the family. You will need to print one copy of Section IX for use later in this training. 286

Purpose of Semi-Annual & Annual Meetings Review and revise the IFSP as appropriate. Review

Purpose of Semi-Annual & Annual Meetings Review and revise the IFSP as appropriate. Review progress toward the achievement of outcomes. Discuss the family’s satisfaction with services being received. Review the results of any new evaluations and ongoing assessments. Share any other new and relevant information related to the child and family. Delete services listed related to outcomes that have been achieved and are no longer needed. Add new outcomes and make changes in services as appropriate. Outline plans for the next six months. 287

Note… Click here to review the NC ITP Manual Bulletin concerning Individualized Family Service

Note… Click here to review the NC ITP Manual Bulletin concerning Individualized Family Service Plans. This will provide you with further explanation regarding semi-annual and annual reviews. New outcomes and changes in services may be made or added at any time. It is not necessary to wait until a scheduled semi-annual review to make changes that are needed and desired by the family. Written Prior Notice requirements must be followed before changes to a service can be made.

Where are we in the Process?

Where are we in the Process?

It is time for the review of Latisa’s initial IFSP. She has been enrolled

It is time for the review of Latisa’s initial IFSP. She has been enrolled in the Infant-Toddler Program for six months. Several of the outcomes developed at the initial IFSP meeting need to be revised. Please review Section IX of the IFSP form, including the instructions, before proceeding with this module. 290

Let’s Reflect… In this module, you have learned how to plan for and conduct

Let’s Reflect… In this module, you have learned how to plan for and conduct an IFSP review meeting. Take a moment to reflect upon the following questions: 1. What steps would you need to take before the meeting? 2. What are the most important changes the family wants to see and what outcomes and activities might that suggest? 3. What issues might arise and need to be dealt with in the meeting? How will you facilitate the meeting to ensure that Noteeveryone that the above questions are the same ideas ones you saw is comfortable and everyone’s are heard? in a previous module addressing planning for the initial 5. What follow-up steps are needed after the meeting? IFSP meeting. These questions remain pertinent and meaningful throughout the time that children are enrolled in the Infant-Toddler Program. 4. 291

Study Guide Activity 28 It is time to review Latisa’s initial IFSP. Please complete

Study Guide Activity 28 It is time to review Latisa’s initial IFSP. Please complete Study Guide Activity 28 before proceeding to the next page.

In this module, you have learned the purpose and requirements for conducting IFSP meetings

In this module, you have learned the purpose and requirements for conducting IFSP meetings and strategies for effective planning and implementation of the IFSP review meeting. Continued sensitivity to families’ needs, strengths, and resources assists Service Coordinators and other IFSP team members to be successful in the development of outcomes meaningful to children and families.

Module IVB: Transition

Module IVB: Transition

After completing this module, the learner will be able to… 1. 2. 3. Discuss

After completing this module, the learner will be able to… 1. 2. 3. Discuss what “transition” from early intervention means. Assist families in exploring special education services as well as other community program options for the child. Convene a transition planning conference with all parties required to develop a transition plan and steps. 295

IFSP Section VII Children receiving early intervention services from the ITP must transition out

IFSP Section VII Children receiving early intervention services from the ITP must transition out of the program at the age of three years. Please print one page of Section VII to for use later in this training.

Where are we in the Process?

Where are we in the Process?

Latisa is now two years, six months old. She has been receiving early intervention

Latisa is now two years, six months old. She has been receiving early intervention services from the Infant. Toddler Program for several months, and has gained significant strengths, but continues to qualify for ITP services. It is time to start planning for Latisa’s transition out of the ITP into the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program or other community services. Please review Section VII of the IFSP form, including the instructions, before proceeding with this module. Click here to view the bulletin from the NC ITP Manual concerning Transition from the Infant-Toddler Program. 298

Transition Children receiving early intervention services from the Infant-Toddler Program must transition out of

Transition Children receiving early intervention services from the Infant-Toddler Program must transition out of the Program at the age of three years. Families must be informed that the entitlements afforded them and their children under the Infant-Toddler Program end at the child’s third birthday. Assisting the family with transitions, including negotiation of timelines and participants, is a major role of the Service Coordinator. The Service Coordinator must involve the family in planning transitions and provide appropriate assistance and attention to ensure that transition is as smooth as possible. The IFSP team, facilitated by the Service Coordinator, must develop outcomes for the IFSP related to transition from the Infant. Toddler Program. 299

General Principles for All Types of Transitions One synonym for transition is “change”. Individuals

General Principles for All Types of Transitions One synonym for transition is “change”. Individuals and families may react very differently to change. For some, changes are unsettling, disruptive, or threatening. For others, changes are seen as growth-producing opportunities or as a benchmark for progress. Good transitions are well-planned processes that occur because of effective communication and collaboration activities among both individuals andnot agencies. 1. Transition is a process, an isolated event. 2. Transition processes and local community transition procedures need to build in average agency response times to requests for services. 3. Families have the right and responsibility to make informed decisions about their choices and options. 4. Families need to be prepared for possible differences in services models. 300

Steps in the Transition Process from the ITP for All Children The steps for

Steps in the Transition Process from the ITP for All Children The steps for transition from the Infant-Toddler Program for all children include: 1. Discussion with and preparation of the parent(s) regarding future placements and other matters related to the child’s transition. 2. Discussion with the parent(s) about the need for service coordination beyond age three and referral to the Child Service Coordination Program or another community provider as appropriate. 3. Evaluation, as appropriate and needed, to determine future needs and eligibility for other programs. 4. Preparation of the child for changes in service delivery, including steps to help the child adjust to and function in a new setting, if appropriate. 301

Steps in the Transition Process from the ITP for All Children, continued 5. 6.

Steps in the Transition Process from the ITP for All Children, continued 5. 6. 7. Documentation in the IFSP of steps to support the transition of the child from the Infant-Toddler Program, including the addition of appropriate outcomes, activities, and timelines. With written parental authorization, the transmission of information about the child to the new provider to ensure continuity of services, including evaluation and assessment information and a copy of the current IFSP. Completion and submission of the NC Infant-Toddler Program data form by the CDSA at the child’s third birthday. 302

Steps in the Transition Process for Children NOT Eligible for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool

Steps in the Transition Process for Children NOT Eligible for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program 1. 2. At the IFSP review closest to the child’s second birthday, the Service Coordinator, in conjunction with CDSA staff and the parent(s) discuss whether the child may be eligible for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program. If the child clearly is not eligible, the Service Coordinator, with the approval of the family, convenes a planning meeting to discuss other possible services that the child and family may want, need, and qualify for, and develop a transition plan. Meeting participants include: parent(s), guardian, or surrogate parent(s); Service Coordinator; and representatives from current and possible future programs. 303

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program 1. On or before the child’s second birthday (primarily for children with vision and hearing problems, or those with complicated or intense service delivery needs): a. The Service Coordinator discusses transition with the parent(s), including steps in the transition process and possible service options. b. The Service Coordinator contacts the local education agency (LEA) to provide information about the child, his special needs, current level and modality of service, his developmental abilities, and other special considerations. c. Written parental authorization is required for the Service Coordinator to share more than the child’s name, date of birth, and contact information for the parent(s). 304

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued 2. Six months (180 days) prior to the child’s third birthday: a. The Service Coordinator discusses transition with the parent(s), including steps in the transition process and possible service options, if not previously done. b. The Service Coordinator contacts the (LEA) to discuss transition and possible eligibility for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, if not previously done. c. The Service Coordinator gives the parent(s) a copy of Early Childhood Transitions in North Carolina: A Parent’s Guide to the Infant-Toddler and Preschool Programs and reviews the content and transition process, if not previously done. 305

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued 3. d. The parent(s) should be informed of all services options available through the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program for the child and invited by the LEA to view different settings. e. The transition meeting can occur at this time, if the parties agree. Three months (90) days prior to the child’s third birthday: a. The Service Coordinator must convene a meeting with the following members: w parent(s); w LEA representative; and w any other person or service provider who might help support and develop the transition plan. 306

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued b. The transition planning meeting may include the following steps: w Referral may be made to the LEA who may begin official paperwork. w If more evaluations are needed to determine outcomes of the Infant-Toddler Program, the CDSA is responsible for completing outcome evaluations in a timely manner before the child turns three. w Individualized Education Plan (IEP) development and possible placement options may be discussed by the LEA with the family. w The transition plan, which is part of the child’s current IFSP, is reviewed or updated. 307

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued 4. One month (30) days prior to the child’s third birthday: a. The Preschool IEP Team may convene an meeting. Members of the team must include: w parent(s), guardian, or surrogate; w referring agency personnel, Service Coordinator, and current service providers, as appropriate; w director of programs for exceptional children or another designee from the LEA other than the child’s teacher; w teacher qualified to provide special education; w teacher qualified to provide regular early childhood education or services; w person knowledgeable about evaluation results; and w others as appropriate. 308

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued b. The Preschool IEP Team provides a copy of families’ rights under the IEP and finalizes: w official referral, if not done earlier; w eligibility determination by the LEA, if all LEA evaluations have been completed; w the IEP which may be completed and signed at this time to begin on the child’s third birthday; and w placement decisions which may be made with official LEA forms signed by the parent(s). 309

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued c. The Service Coordinator, LEA representative, and the parent(s), as part of the IEP Team, work closely together to ensure that decisions regarding service provision are made collaboratively. w At the time of the IEP meeting, if differences exist between team members regarding the services for the child, the IEP Team must come to a consensus. w If the IEP team cannot reach consensus then the LEA must make the decision. The parent(s) is/are advised of the rights to due process if not in agreement with the Team’s or LEA’s decision on educational services. 310

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional

Steps in the Transition Process for Children From the Infant-Toddler Program to the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program, continued 5. Upon the child’s third birthday: a. The LEA assumes responsibility for ensuring free and appropriate public education and guaranteeing protection of child and family rights. b. The IEP becomes effective. c. The IEP Team has ensured a smooth transition from Infant-Toddler Program services to Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program Services. 311

Eligibility Categories for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program The term “preschool children with special

Eligibility Categories for the Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program The term “preschool children with special needs” includes threeand four-year-old children. It also includes those five-year-old children who are ineligible for kindergarten and who, because of permanent or temporary cognitive, communicative, socialemotional, or adaptive disabilities, are unable to have all of their developmental needs met in a normal environment without special education and related services. Preschool aged children may become eligible for services upon reaching their third birthday. Categories of eligibility, along with other details about Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program services can be found in Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities. Information about obtaining this document is available from the LEA. 312

Study Guide Activity 29 Click here to review a sample Transition Plan. Please complete

Study Guide Activity 29 Click here to review a sample Transition Plan. Please complete Study Guide Activity 29 before proceeding to the next page.

In Summary… In this module, you have learned how to plan for and conduct

In Summary… In this module, you have learned how to plan for and conduct an IFSP transition planning meeting. 314

Remember that… Good transitions are well-planned processes that occur because of effective communication and

Remember that… Good transitions are well-planned processes that occur because of effective communication and collaboration activities among both individuals and agencies. A child and family make numerous transitions while in the Infant-Toddler Program. Examples of such transitions include: w hospital to home; w agency to agency; w provider to provider; w home to center-based; and w Infant-Toddler Program to Exceptional Children’s Preschool Program and/or other community settings. You are now ready to assist Latisa and her family in successful transition out of the NC Infant-Toddler Program. 315

Module IVC: Natural Environments

Module IVC: Natural Environments

Let’s Review…

Let’s Review…

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. You have now completed an entire IFSP process and

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. You have now completed an entire IFSP process and will be able to develop a written document for Latisa Richardson and her family. She was referred to the Infant-Toddler Program by her pediatrician and parent(s). The CDSA completed an entry-level evaluation and determined eligibility. You planned for, coordinated, and conducted an initial IFSP meeting. The IFSP Team discussed and developed outcomes and activities to meet the identified needs of Latisa and her family. 318

6. 7. 8. 9. The IFSP Team discussed and developed a service delivery plan

6. 7. 8. 9. The IFSP Team discussed and developed a service delivery plan to implement the identified child and family outcomes. You planned for, coordinated, and conducted IFSP plan reviews at the required intervals (semi-annually and annually). You planned for, coordinated, and conducted a transition meeting to prepare and assist Latisa and her family to exit the Infant. Toddler Program. Latisa successfully transitioned out of the Infant-Toddler Program. 319

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process As you review these principles, link them to the

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process As you review these principles, link them to the skills you have learned as you progressed through this IFSP training. Infants and toddlers are uniquely dependent on their families for their survival and nurturance. This dependence necessitates a family-centered approach to early intervention. States and programs should define “family” in a way that reflects the diversity of family patterns and structures. Each family has its own structures, roles, values, beliefs, and coping styles. Respect for and acceptance of this diversity is a cornerstone of family-centered early intervention. Source: Mc. Gonigel, M. J. (1991). Philosophy and conceptual framework. In M. J. Mc. Gonigel, R. K. Kaufmann, & B. H. Johnson (Eds). Guidelines and Recommended Practices for the Individualized Family Service Plan, 2 nd ed. Pp. 7 -12). Bethesda, MD: Association for the Care of Children’s Health. 320

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process, continued Early intervention systems and strategies must honor the

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process, continued Early intervention systems and strategies must honor the racial, ethnic, cultural, and socio-emotional diversity of families. Respect for family autonomy, independence, and decisionmaking means that families must be able to choose the level and nature of early intervention’s involvement in their lives. An empowering approach to working with families requires that professionals reexamine their traditional roles and practices, and develop new practices when necessary, practices that promote mutual respect and relationships. Source: Mc. Gonigel, M. J. (1991). Philosophy and conceptual framework. In M. J. Mc. Gonigel, R. K. Kaufmann, & B. H. Johnson (Eds). Guidelines and Recommended Practices for the Individualized Family Service Plan, 2 nd ed. Pp. 7 -12). Bethesda, MD: Association for the Care of Children’s Health. 321

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process, Continued Early intervention services should be flexible, accessible, and

Principles Underlying the IFSP Process, Continued Early intervention services should be flexible, accessible, and responsive to family-identified needs. Early Intervention services should be offered according to the normalization principle – that is, families should have access to services provided in as normal a fashion and environment as possible, and that promote the integration of the child and family within the community. No one agency of discipline can meet the diverse and complex needs of infants and toddlers with special needs and their families. Therefore, a team approach to planning and implementing the IFSP is necessary. Family/professional collaboration and partnerships are the keys to family-centered early intervention and to successful implementation of the IFSP process. Source: Mc. Gonigel, M. J. (1991). Philosophy and conceptual framework. In M. J. 322 Mc. Gonigel, R. K. Kaufmann, & B. H. Johnson (Eds). Guidelines and Recommended nd Practices for the Individualized Family Service Plan, 2 ed. Pp. 7 -12). Bethesda, MD:

Study Guide Activity 30 Click here to print “Quality Indicators Checklist”. This is a

Study Guide Activity 30 Click here to print “Quality Indicators Checklist”. This is a tool for evaluating both technical and quality features of IFSPs. You need this tool to complete the next Study Guide Activity. Please complete Study Guide Activity 30 before proceeding to the next page.

Learning Activities to Complete with Your Supervisor Please complete the following required learning activities

Learning Activities to Complete with Your Supervisor Please complete the following required learning activities with your supervisor. w Review Study Guide Activities to verify that you have completed them. w Review and critique the completed IFSP story for Latisa. w Attend an IFSP Review meeting. w Attend a Transition meeting. 324

Learning Activities to Complete with Your Supervisor The following optional activities are recommended to

Learning Activities to Complete with Your Supervisor The following optional activities are recommended to enhance your learning. w Discuss other Study Guide Activities at more length with your mentor or supervisor. w Ask questions as needed to clarify information presented in this online training. w Attend additional IFSP meetings. w Review existing cases (your own or someone else’s) keeping in mind what you have learned. 325

Congratulations! You have completed the Needs, Dreams, and IFSPs training. See your supervisor for

Congratulations! You have completed the Needs, Dreams, and IFSPs training. See your supervisor for your certificate. Click here to see a suggested list of links for your continued professional development.