OCR English Language GCSE Component 1 Writing Assessment

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OCR English Language GCSE Component 1 Writing

OCR English Language GCSE Component 1 Writing

Assessment Objectives • A 05 – 24 Marks • A 06 – 16 Marks

Assessment Objectives • A 05 – 24 Marks • A 06 – 16 Marks A 05 – Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts. A 06 – Candidates must use a range of vocabulary and sentence for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

Writing Skills: • Purpose – Writing to… • Explain • Inform • Argue •

Writing Skills: • Purpose – Writing to… • Explain • Inform • Argue • Persuade • Advise What writing skills and techniques would you use to successfully produce a piece with these purposes? ? ? ? ?

 • WRITING TO EXPLAIN When you are explaining you have to give detailed

• WRITING TO EXPLAIN When you are explaining you have to give detailed reasons and justifications for the points you are making. Make sure all your points are backed up with clear explanations. • WRITING TO INFORM When you are informing you have to give your reader a range of factual information about a particular topic. Make sure all the information you give is clear and try and make it sound as interesting and entertaining as possible. • WRITING TO ADVISE When you are advising you are helping the reader decide what to do. You need to give them a variety of options and advice and do so in a friendly, sympathetic way – remember, you are making suggestions rather than telling them what to do. • WRITING TO PERSUADE When you are persuading you are trying to convince the reader to do something or think something. You must write in an entertaining manner, using lots of persuasive techniques so that the reader cannot fail but agree with you. Be assertive and forceful. • WRITING TO ARGUE When you are arguing you must convince the reader that your point of view about a topic is the correct one. You points must be very clear and convincing, and backed up with proper evidence, which might take the form of statistics, expert quotes, anecdotes and other examples. You should also use counter-argument to anticipate opposing views to your own.

Inform/Explain/Argue/Persuade Explain Argue/Persuade Use evidence (this does not have to be true you can

Inform/Explain/Argue/Persuade Explain Argue/Persuade Use evidence (this does not have to be true you can make it up as long as you present it as evidence) Give reasons Facts/Statistics/anecdotes/examples Argue - Make your point of view very clear. Persuade - Be very clear about what you are trying to persuade the reader to do/think. Statistics I know this because… Anecdotes This happened because… Use evidence Use devices to persuade the reader to act/change: Use device to convince/persuade the person reading to agree with your point of view: Rhetorical questions Examples/evidence/facts/statistics/ane cdote Adjectives/adverbs Repetition/ alliteration

Writing Skills • Text Type/Form: • Article • Speech • Letter • Blog What

Writing Skills • Text Type/Form: • Article • Speech • Letter • Blog What are these text types like? How do each look on the page? What features do they have?

Article Park life: the wildlife of Britain's cities Far from destroying the British love

Article Park life: the wildlife of Britain's cities Far from destroying the British love of nature, our cities have become urban oases for wildlife An urban fox in a town garden Photograph: Alamy Today, at the beginning of the 21 st century, the British are more obsessed with nature and wildlife than any other nation on earth. Television programmes such as Springwatch have legions of loyal fans; the RSPB has more than one million members, while almost as many have joined their local wildlife trust; two out of three of us feed birds in our gardens. And yet this national passion for wildlife is a very modern phenomenon. Its origins lie in a major change that occurred in British society around two centuries ago: the shift from a mainly rural society to a predominantly urban one, a change that at the time threatened to destroy our passion for nature altogether.

Speech Obama Inaugural Address 20 th January 2009 My fellow citizens: I stand here

Speech Obama Inaugural Address 20 th January 2009 My fellow citizens: I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition. Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents. So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.

Letter This letter, written by Charles Dickens in 1838, focuses on his journey to

Letter This letter, written by Charles Dickens in 1838, focuses on his journey to Yorkshire by train. My dearest Kate, I am afraid you will receive this later than I could wish, as the mail does not come through this place until two o'clock tomorrow morning. However, I have availed myself of the very first opportunity of writing, so the fault is that mail's, and not this. Yesterday we were up again shortly after seven a. m. , came on upon our journey by the Glasgow mail, which charged us the remarkably low sum of six pounds fare for two places inside. We had a very droll male companion until seven o'clock in the evening, and a most delicious lady's-maid for twenty miles, who implored us to keep a sharp look-out at the coach-windows, as she expected the carriage was coming to meet her and she was afraid of missing it. We had many delightful vauntings of the same kind; but in the end it is scarcely necessary to say that the coach did not come, but a very dirty girl did. As we came further north the mire grew deeper. About eight o'clock it began to fall heavily, and, as we crossed the wild heaths hereabout, there was no vestige of a track. The mail kept on well, however, and at eleven we reached a bare place with a house standing alone in the midst of a dreary moor, which the guard informed us was Greta Bridge. I was in a perfect agony of apprehension, for it was fearfully cold, and there were no outward signs of anybody being up in the house. But to our great joy we discovered a comfortable room, with drawn curtains and a most blazing fire. In half an hour they gave us a smoking supper and a bottle of mulled port (in which we drank your health), and then we retired to a couple of capital bedrooms, in each of which there was a rousing fire halfway up the chimney. We have had for breakfast, toast, cakes, a Yorkshire pie, a piece of beef about the size and much the shape of my portmanteau, tea, coffee, ham, and eggs; and are now going to look about us. Ever, my dear Kate, Your affectionate Husband

Writing Skills: • Literacy: • Write in full sentences • Commonly/frequently used words spelt

Writing Skills: • Literacy: • Write in full sentences • Commonly/frequently used words spelt correctly • Punctuation used to enable clear understanding – particularly full stops and commas • Clear paragraphs and organisation of ideas • A range of vocabulary

Using TAP: • Text – What is the text type or form? Is it

Using TAP: • Text – What is the text type or form? Is it an article, letter, speech or Blog? How will you show the features of this type of text? How will you present your writing? • Audience – What audience will you need to address? How might this be done? • Purpose – What is the purpose of the writing? What language techniques will you use to effectively meet this purpose?

Example Question: • Write a speech for your class in which you argue that

Example Question: • Write a speech for your class in which you argue that violence is not the solution to conflict between people. • In your speech you should: The text you write will link to ideas you have already explored in the reading section • Explain why peaceful solutions are better than violent ones • Give some examples to support your argument • Convince your audience that violence does not solve conflict Apply the TAP method to this question:

English Language – Book 1 • Turn to pages 26 -27: • Objective: To

English Language – Book 1 • Turn to pages 26 -27: • Objective: To analyse how language and structure are used to present viewpoints, achieve effects and influence readers. • Read the text by Charles Dickens and explore how language is used for effect. • Now use some of the ideas in the text to write a response for Activity 2.

Question: • Look at the images below. Explore what ideas they make you think

Question: • Look at the images below. Explore what ideas they make you think about. Particularly the idea of contract and conflict. • Write a short essay about a place which creates conflicting thoughts and feelings for you. • Planning – TAP the question. Note down some of the contrasting thoughts you have about your chosen place. Share your ideas with someone else and try to develop them further. Add questions, explanations and anecdotes to support your ideas. • Drafting – Try to include balanced sentences to show your contrasting ideas. Think about how your choice of language and techniques will help you to convey your ideas effectively.

English Language – Book 1 • Turn to pages 66 -67 • Objective: •

English Language – Book 1 • Turn to pages 66 -67 • Objective: • To evaluate how form contributes to the impact of a text. • Read the letter written by Stephen Fry and explore how the form and content of the letter create impact. • Now use the letter to help you to write in a specific form, to a specific audience and for a specific purpose.

Question: • Think of a person you would like to ask for advice. This

Question: • Think of a person you would like to ask for advice. This could be a famous person or somebody you know. Write a personal letter to this person explaining why you would like their advice. • In your letter you should: • Think about the tone you want to create • Consider the formality of the language you use • Try to elicit an emotional response from your reader Remember! Plan carefully! TAP the question!

Question: • Write an article for your school magazine in which you persuade readers

Question: • Write an article for your school magazine in which you persuade readers that war is either a good or bad thing. Follow the steps below to help you to plan and draft your article. • Planning • • • TAP the questions An interesting, short opening paragraph making clear your point of view First main argument and supporting ideas and information Second argument and supporting ideas and information A short and powerful conclusion