Nuclear Energy Institute Update Susan PerkinsGrew Senior Director

  • Slides: 36
Download presentation
Nuclear Energy Institute Update Susan Perkins-Grew Senior Director Security & Emergency Preparedness 2016 NREP

Nuclear Energy Institute Update Susan Perkins-Grew Senior Director Security & Emergency Preparedness 2016 NREP May 5, 2016 • Charleston, South Carolina 1

Topics Value of Nuclear Energy Delivering the Nuclear Promise Future of Nuclear Energy FLEX

Topics Value of Nuclear Energy Delivering the Nuclear Promise Future of Nuclear Energy FLEX & National SAFER Response Center Update • Protecting our Facilities • • 2

VALUE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY {DATE} 3 {Presentation Descriptor}

VALUE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY {DATE} 3 {Presentation Descriptor}

Secretary of Energy “The threat of climate change calls for global responses, including expanded

Secretary of Energy “The threat of climate change calls for global responses, including expanded use of nuclear power to produce the electricity needed to sustain rising standards of living of the world’s growing population. ” — Ernest Moniz, Secretary of Energy, September 14, 2015 4

Spotlight on Nuclear Energy’s Value • Powering through the Polar Vortex - Value of

Spotlight on Nuclear Energy’s Value • Powering through the Polar Vortex - Value of base load capacity with firm fuel supply • EPA Clean Power Plan proposal to reduce CO 2 emissions by 30% by 2030 - Cannot be achieved and sustained without preserving existing nuclear generating capacity and building new nuclear capacity 5

Preventing Electric Sector Carbon Emissions U. S. Electric Power Industry CO 2 Avoided Million

Preventing Electric Sector Carbon Emissions U. S. Electric Power Industry CO 2 Avoided Million Metric Tons 2014 Nuclear Hydro -184 Wind -133 Geothermal -12. 17 Solar -13. 4 -595 Source: Emissions avoided are calculated using regional and national fossil fuel emissions rates from the Environmental Protection Agency and generation data from the Energy Information Administration. U. S. Carbon-Free Electricity Sources 2014 6

Why Nuclear Power Plants Are at Risk • Low growth (in some cases, no

Why Nuclear Power Plants Are at Risk • Low growth (in some cases, no growth) in electricity demand coming out of 2008 recession • Continuing surge in supply of low-cost shale gas • Key attributes (carbon-free, price stability, 24 -by-7 operation, etc. ) not fully valued in competitive markets • Transmission constraints • Prices suppressed by RTO policies and actions, and by state and federal mandates and subsidies • Fuel/technology diversity is taken for granted and undervalued Failure to address these issues could (1) compromise resource adequacy and reliability, (2) expose consumers to higher prices and increasing price volatility, (3) frustrate efforts to reduce carbon emissions 7

DELIVERING THE NUCLEAR PROMISE 8

DELIVERING THE NUCLEAR PROMISE 8

Delivering the Nuclear Promise…. Safety, Reliability and Improved Efficiency • Sustain high levels of

Delivering the Nuclear Promise…. Safety, Reliability and Improved Efficiency • Sustain high levels of safety and reliability • Identify opportunities and re-design plant processes to improve efficiency and effectiveness • Use innovative technology to increase efficiency across the industry • Educate and drive awareness of the value of nuclear energy – particularly the economic and environmental benefits 9

Why is Delivering the Nuclear Promise Important? • Several U. S. nuclear plants have

Why is Delivering the Nuclear Promise Important? • Several U. S. nuclear plants have shut down and more are facing economic challenges • Electricity markets are deluged with natural gas at historically low prices • Solar and wind are provided subsidies and other competitive advantages • Despite historically high capacity factors, generating costs have increased 28% during the last decade • “Business as usual” will not successfully address the challenges of rising costs and inadequate revenue 10

Response to the Challenge 11

Response to the Challenge 11

FUTURE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY 12

FUTURE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY 12

The Future of Nuclear Energy 13

The Future of Nuclear Energy 13

Keys to the Future • More rational, functional energy markets • Continued strong federal

Keys to the Future • More rational, functional energy markets • Continued strong federal support - Ex-IM Back reauthorization; new and renewed 123 agreements - Appropriate treatment for nuclear under EPA 111(d) - Loan guarantees and other commercialization support for SMRs • Successful completion of lead new plant projects So that others may follow 14

Potential Benefits of Small LWR Reactors • • • Enhanced safety and security Matching

Potential Benefits of Small LWR Reactors • • • Enhanced safety and security Matching demand growth and financing flexibility Diverse applications and siting flexibility Economic growth and job creation Expand nuclear benefits to areas and applications underserved by large plants - Clean air - Fuel diversity 15

SMR Path Forward • Need for regulatory approaches more appropriate to SMR enhanced safety

SMR Path Forward • Need for regulatory approaches more appropriate to SMR enhanced safety and security - Emergency Preparedness - Security - Plant staffing • Near term applications - 2016 - TVA early site permit and Nu. Scale design certification - 2017/2018 – Utah Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS) combined license 16

Proposed Advanced Reactor Legislation

Proposed Advanced Reactor Legislation

FLEX & NATIONAL SAFER RESPONSE CENTER UPDATE 18

FLEX & NATIONAL SAFER RESPONSE CENTER UPDATE 18

Exelon Generation Company: “FLEX AT WORK” 19

Exelon Generation Company: “FLEX AT WORK” 19

“When the commission was assessing the best approach to dealing with beyond-design-basis external events

“When the commission was assessing the best approach to dealing with beyond-design-basis external events in response to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, the industry developed a concept for FLEX equipment and out of that was born the national response centers. To me, that is a collaborative problem-solving effort and innovation at its best. ” - Chairman Steve Burns, USNRC Commission, March 10, 2016 20

National Framework for Industry Response Affected Station(s) • Mitigate event consequences • Make notifications

National Framework for Industry Response Affected Station(s) • Mitigate event consequences • Make notifications • Request industry assistance Unaffected Stations Nat’l SAFER RCs Provide requested support: • Equipment • Personnel with needed expertise NEI Provides information to: • Governmental agencies • Media • Financial community • General public Works with government agencies on regulatory implications Provide requested support: • Equipment • Long term coping capability INPO Responds to operational/technical aspects of event, including: • Facilitate overall industry response • Coordinating technical and materials support • Provide operating experience information EPRI Provides independent technical support, including access to: • Subject-matter experts • Specialized research activities • Analysis to advise other organizations or affected nuclear operators 21

PROTECTION OF OUR FACILITIES 22

PROTECTION OF OUR FACILITIES 22

World Events…Belgium

World Events…Belgium

U. S. Security Program - Overview • U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Ensures

U. S. Security Program - Overview • U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Ensures that licensee security programs and contingency plans deal with threats, thefts, and sabotage relating to special nuclear material, highlevel radioactive wastes, nuclear facilities, and other radioactive materials and activities that the NRC regulates. - www. nrc. gov 24

Overview - Design Basis Threat • Several well trained dedicated adversaries • Determined violent

Overview - Design Basis Threat • Several well trained dedicated adversaries • Determined violent assault • Hand held automatic weapons with silencers and with long range accuracy Insider assistance Incapacitating agents Explosives Vehicle bombs Vehicles as means of entry • Cyber attacks • • • 25

Overview - Nuclear Plant Security Areas Owner Controlled Area Protected Area Fence Protected Area

Overview - Nuclear Plant Security Areas Owner Controlled Area Protected Area Fence Protected Area Access Control Point Vital Area 26

Overview - Response Capabilities • Fixed Sites: Armed response to an unauthorized intrusion into

Overview - Response Capabilities • Fixed Sites: Armed response to an unauthorized intrusion into a protected area and attack on a nuclear facility could be by - Licensee's on-site armed security force, with the Local Law Enforcement Authority (LLEA) and FBI arriving later 27

Overview - Licensee Response Preparation • Licensee security responders must be appropriately armed and

Overview - Licensee Response Preparation • Licensee security responders must be appropriately armed and in sufficient number to counter the potential threat. • Security officers undergo significant training and qualification in, among other things: - physical fitness weapons safety nuclear and radiation safety weapons proficiency use of force tactical movements response strategies 28

Overview - Licensee Response Preparation, cont’d. • Protective strategies for specific vital area equipment

Overview - Licensee Response Preparation, cont’d. • Protective strategies for specific vital area equipment – “target sets” • Interaction with the LLEA includes advance planning and coordination, including familiarity tours 29

Overview - Force-On-Force Exercises • Demonstration of security response capabilities • Quarterly drills and

Overview - Force-On-Force Exercises • Demonstration of security response capabilities • Quarterly drills and annual exercises • Evaluated exercises reinstated in November 2004 - Significant changes; more realism - Three year cycle 30

Post-9/11 Security Enhancements • NRC issued Orders including measures to protect against an insider

Post-9/11 Security Enhancements • NRC issued Orders including measures to protect against an insider terrorist attack; waterborne, airborne, and land-based assaults; as well as threats from a vehicle bomb • Increased number of officers by 60% • Industry expenditures in excess of $1. 2 billion 31

Post-9/11 Security Enhancements • Additional protection against vehicle and waterborne explosive devices • Added

Post-9/11 Security Enhancements • Additional protection against vehicle and waterborne explosive devices • Added and upgraded armament • Improved operational readiness • Revised Emergency Plans • Enhanced coordination with state and local law enforcement officials • Enhanced security officer training 32

Summary • U. S. commercial nuclear power plants are the most secure industrial facilities

Summary • U. S. commercial nuclear power plants are the most secure industrial facilities in the National infrastructure • Industry is voluntarily proactive and responsive and has significantly improved capabilities to respond to a significant terrorist attack • Partnering with Federal agencies integrates and leverages resources in a meaningful and cooperative way 33

www. nei. org 35

www. nei. org 35

Questions? Sue Perkins-Grew spg@nei. org 202 -247 -8163

Questions? Sue Perkins-Grew [email protected] org 202 -247 -8163