MultiEntity Bayesian Networks Without MultiTears Bayesian Networks Seminar

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Multi-Entity Bayesian Networks Without Multi-Tears Bayesian Networks Seminar Jan 3 -4, 2007 1

Multi-Entity Bayesian Networks Without Multi-Tears Bayesian Networks Seminar Jan 3 -4, 2007 1

Limitations of Bayesian networks Not expressive enough for many real world applications. n fixed

Limitations of Bayesian networks Not expressive enough for many real world applications. n fixed number of attributes n varying numbers of related entities of different types. 2

Systems based on first-order logic (FOL) n the ability to represent entities of different

Systems based on first-order logic (FOL) n the ability to represent entities of different types interacting with each other in varied ways. n n “has enough expressive power to define all of mathematics. . and the semantics of every version of logic, including itself” lack a theoretically principled, widely accepted, logically coherent methodology for reasoning under uncertainty. 3

Multi-entity Bayesian networks (MEBN) n n a knowledge representation formalism that combines the expressive

Multi-entity Bayesian networks (MEBN) n n a knowledge representation formalism that combines the expressive power of first-order logic with a sound and logically consistent treatment of uncertainty. not a computer language or an application. 4

Multi-entity Bayesian networks (MEBN) (cont. . ) A formal system that instantiates first-order Bayesian

Multi-entity Bayesian networks (MEBN) (cont. . ) A formal system that instantiates first-order Bayesian logic. n MEBN provides syntax, a set of model construction and inference processes, and semantics that together provide a means of defining probability distributions over unbounded and possibly infinite numbers of interrelated hypotheses. n As such, MEBN provides a logical foundation for the many emerging languages that extend the expressiveness of Bayesian networks. 5

An example: Star Trek n illustrate the limitations of standard BNs for situations that

An example: Star Trek n illustrate the limitations of standard BNs for situations that demand a more powerful representation formalism. 6

Decision Support Systems in the 24 th Century 7

Decision Support Systems in the 24 th Century 7

The Basic Starship Bayesian Network 8

The Basic Starship Bayesian Network 8

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Problems n little use in a real life starship environment 10

Problems n little use in a real life starship environment 10

The BN for Four Starships 11

The BN for Four Starships 11

Limitations of Bayesian networks n BNs lack the expressive power to represent entity types

Limitations of Bayesian networks n BNs lack the expressive power to represent entity types (e. g. , starships) that can be instantiated as many times as required for the situation at hand. 12

The Premise n n the likelihood ratio for a high MDR is 7/5 =

The Premise n n the likelihood ratio for a high MDR is 7/5 = 1. 4 in favor of a starship in cloak mode. Although this favors a cloaked starship in the vicinity, the evidence is not overwhelming. 13

Repetition n Repetition is a powerful way to boost the discriminatory power of weak

Repetition n Repetition is a powerful way to boost the discriminatory power of weak signals. n an example: n n from airport terminal radars, a single pulse reflected from an aircraft usually arrives back to the radar receiver very weakened, making it hard to set apart from background noise. However, a steady sequence of reflected radar pulses is easily distinguishable from background noise. 14

Repetition (cont. . ) n n Following the same logic, it is reasonable to

Repetition (cont. . ) n n Following the same logic, it is reasonable to assume that an abnormal background disturbance will show random fluctuation, whereas a disturbance caused by a starship in cloak mode would show a characteristic temporal pattern. Thus, when there is a cloaked starship nearby, the MDR state at any time depends on its previous state. 15

The BN for One Starship with Recursion 16

The BN for One Starship with Recursion 16

Temporal Recursion n DBNs PDBN a more general recursion capability is needed, as well

Temporal Recursion n DBNs PDBN a more general recursion capability is needed, as well as a parsimonious syntax for expressing recursive relationships. 17

Using MEBN Logic n a more “realistic” sci-fi scenario. n different alien species: n

Using MEBN Logic n a more “realistic” sci-fi scenario. n different alien species: n n Friends, Cardassians, Romulans, and Klingons while addressing encounters with other possible races using the general label. Unknown. consider each starship’s type, offensive power, the ability of inflict harm to the Enterprise given its range, and numerous other features pertinent to the model’s purpose. 18

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n MEBN logic represents the world as

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n MEBN logic represents the world as comprised of entities that have attributes and are related to other entities. Random Variables. 19

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n Knowledge about attributes and relationships is

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n Knowledge about attributes and relationships is expressed as a collection of MFrags organized into MTheories. MEBN Fragments (MFrags). n n represents a conditional probability distribution for instances of its resident RVs given their parents in the fragment graph and the context nodes. MEBN Theories (MTheories). n a set of MFrags that collectively satisfies consistency constraints ensuring the existence of a unique joint probability distribution over instances of the RVs represented in each of the MFrags within the set. 20

The Danger. To. Self MFrag 21

The Danger. To. Self MFrag 21

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n Nodes: n n n Contex nodes. Input

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n Nodes: n n n Contex nodes. Input nodes. Resdent nodes. Arguments. Unique identifier n Exclamation point. 22

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n Instances of the RV. n n Home

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n Instances of the RV. n n Home MFrag. n n Harm. Potential(!ST 1, !T 1), Harm. Potential(!ST 2, !T 1) Local distribution Boolean context nodes. n n True, False, or Absurd. Relevant only for deciding whether to use a resident random variable’s local distribution or its default distribution. 23

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n No probability values are shown for the

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n No probability values are shown for the states of the nodes. n n a node in an MFrag represents a generic class of random variables. Identify all the instances n n none pseudo code. 24

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n Local distributions in standard BNs are

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n Local distributions in standard BNs are typically represented by static tables, which limits each node to a fixed number of parents. An instance of a node in an MTheory might have any number of parents. n MEBN implementations(i. e. languages based on MEBN logic) must provide an expressive language for defining local distributions. 25

An Instance of the Danger. To. Self MFrag 26

An Instance of the Danger. To. Self MFrag 26

An Instance of the Danger. To. Self MFrag (cont. . ) n the belief

An Instance of the Danger. To. Self MFrag (cont. . ) n the belief for state Unacceptable is. 975 (. 90 +. 025*3) and the beliefs for states High, Medium, and Low are. 02 ((1 -. 975)*. 8), . 005 ((1 -. 975)*. 2), and zero respectively. 27

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n more complex knowledge patterns could be

Using MEBN Logic (cont. . ) n n more complex knowledge patterns could be accommodated as needed to suit the requirements of the application. MEBN logic has built-in logical MFrags that provide the ability to express anything that can be expressed in firstorder logic. 28

Recursive MFrags n n One of the main limitations of BNs is their lack

Recursive MFrags n n One of the main limitations of BNs is their lack of support for recursion. MEBN provides theoretically grounded support for very general recursive definitions of local distributions. 29

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n n MEBN logic allows influences between instances of

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n n MEBN logic allows influences between instances of the same random variable. The recursion is grounded by specifying an initial distribution at time !T 0 that does not depend on a previous magnetic disturbance. 30

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n How recursive definitions can be applied to construct

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n How recursive definitions can be applied to construct a situation-specific Bayesian Network (SSBN) to answer a query. n Example: n n !Z 0, !T 3, !ST 0 and !ST 1 Zone. MD(!Z 0, !T 3) 31

The Zone MFrag 32

The Zone MFrag 32

SSBN Constructed from Zone MFrag 33

SSBN Constructed from Zone MFrag 33

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n Steps: n n n begin by creating an

Recursive MFrags (cont. . ) n Steps: n n n begin by creating an instance of the home MFrag of the query node Zone. MD(!Z 0, !T 3). build any CPTs we can already build. recursively creating instances of the home MFrags until we have added all the nodes. 34

Building MEBN models with MTheories n n MFrags provide a flexible means to represent

Building MEBN models with MTheories n n MFrags provide a flexible means to represent knowledge about specific subjects within the domain of discourse. but the true gain in expressive power is revealed when we aggregate these “knowledge patterns” to form a coherent model of the domain of discourse that can be instantiated to reason about specific situations and refined through learning. n just collecting a set MFrags that represent specific parts of a domain is not enough to ensure a coherent representation of that domain. n a set of MFrags with cyclic influences 35

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n n In order to build

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n n In order to build a coherent model we have to make sure that our set of MFrags collectively satisfies consistency constraints ensuring the existence of a unique joint probability distribution over instances of the random variables mentioned in the MFrags. Such a coherent collection of MFrags is called an MTheory. An MTheory represents a joint probability distribution for an unbounded, possibly infinite number of instances of its random variables. 36

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n A generative MTheory n n

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n A generative MTheory n n summarizes statistical regularities that characterize a domain. These regularities are captured and encoded in a knowledge base using some combination of expert judgment and learning from observation. To apply a generative MTheory to reason about particular scenarios, we need to provide the system with specific information about the individual entity instances involved in the scenario. n Bayesian inference n n answer specific questions of interest refine the MTheory 37

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n Findings n n the basic

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n Findings n n the basic mechanism for incorporating observations into MTheories. a finding is represented as a special 2 -node MFrag containing a node from the generative MTheory and a node declaring one of its states to have a given value. 38

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n n Inserting a finding into

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n n Inserting a finding into an MTheory corresponds to asserting a new axiom in a first-order theory. In other words, MEBN logic is inherently open, having the ability to incorporate new axioms as evidence and update the probabilities of all random variables in a logically consistent way. 39

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n A valid MTheory n n

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n A valid MTheory n n Each random variable must have a unique home MFrag. It must ensure that all recursive definitions terminate in finitely many steps and contain no circular influences. 40

The Star Trek Generative MTheory 41

The Star Trek Generative MTheory 41

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n It is important to understand

Building MEBN models with MTheories (cont. . ) n It is important to understand the power and flexibility that MEBN logic gives to knowledge base designers by allowing multiple, equivalent ways of portraying the same knowledge. 42

Equivalent MFrag Representations of Knowledge 43

Equivalent MFrag Representations of Knowledge 43

Inference in MEBN Logic n BN n n Assessing the impact of new evidence

Inference in MEBN Logic n BN n n Assessing the impact of new evidence involves conditioning on the values of evidence nodes and applying a belief propagation algorithm. MEBN n have an initial generative MTheory, a Finding set and Target set. n construct SSBN. n n n Creating instances of Finding and Target random variables. standard BN inference is applied. Inspecting the posterior probabilities of the target nodes. 44

SSBN for the Star Trek MTheory with Four Starships within Enterprise’s Range 45

SSBN for the Star Trek MTheory with Four Starships within Enterprise’s Range 45