Modern Control Systems MCS Lecture10 LagLead Compensation Dr

  • Slides: 16
Download presentation
Modern Control Systems (MCS) Lecture-10 Lag-Lead Compensation Dr. Imtiaz Hussain Assistant Professor email: imtiaz.

Modern Control Systems (MCS) Lecture-10 Lag-Lead Compensation Dr. Imtiaz Hussain Assistant Professor email: imtiaz. [email protected] muet. edu. pk URL : http: //imtiazhussainkalwar. weebly. com/ 1

Lecture Outline

Lecture Outline

Introduction • Lead compensation basically speeds up the response and increases the stability of

Introduction • Lead compensation basically speeds up the response and increases the stability of the system. • Lag compensation improves the steady-state accuracy of the system, but reduces the speed of the response. • If improvements in both transient response and steady-state response are desired, then both a lead compensator and a lag compensator may be used simultaneously. • Rather than introducing both a lead compensator and a lag compensator as separate units, however, it is economical to use a single lag–lead compensator.

Lag-Lead Compensation • Lag-Lead compensators are represented by following transfer function • Where Kc

Lag-Lead Compensation • Lag-Lead compensators are represented by following transfer function • Where Kc belongs to lead portion of the compensator.

Lag-Lead Compensation

Lag-Lead Compensation

Design Procedure •

Design Procedure •

Design Procedure (Case-1) •

Design Procedure (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) • Consider the control system shown in following figure • The damping

Example-1 (Case-1) • Consider the control system shown in following figure • The damping ratio is 0. 125, the undamped natural frequency is 2 rad/sec, and the static velocity error constant is 8 sec– 1. • It is desired to make the damping ratio of the dominant closed-loop poles equal to 0. 5 and to increase the undamped natural frequency to 5 rad/sec and the static velocity error constant to 80 sec– 1. • Design an appropriate compensator to meet all the performance specifications.

Example-1 (Case-1) • From the performance specifications, the dominant closed-loop poles must be at

Example-1 (Case-1) • From the performance specifications, the dominant closed-loop poles must be at • Since • Therefore the phase-lead portion of the lag–lead compensator must contribute 55° so that the root locus passes through the desired location of the dominant closed-loop poles.

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) •

Example-1 (Case-1) • Now the transfer function of the designed lag–lead compensator is given

Example-1 (Case-1) • Now the transfer function of the designed lag–lead compensator is given by

Example-1 (Case-2) Home Work

Example-1 (Case-2) Home Work

Home Work • Electronic Lag-Lead Compensator • Electrical Lag-Lead Compensator • Mechanical Lag-Lead Compensator

Home Work • Electronic Lag-Lead Compensator • Electrical Lag-Lead Compensator • Mechanical Lag-Lead Compensator

To download this lecture visit http: //imtiazhussainkalwar. weebly. com/ END OF LECTURE-10

To download this lecture visit http: //imtiazhussainkalwar. weebly. com/ END OF LECTURE-10