Managing the Rollercoaster Ride of Your Students First

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Managing the Rollercoaster Ride of Your Student’s First Year Dr. Christina Spearman Assistant Dean

Managing the Rollercoaster Ride of Your Student’s First Year Dr. Christina Spearman Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Student Life

Do you like rollercoasters? �Changes in the first semester of college can feel like

Do you like rollercoasters? �Changes in the first semester of college can feel like an emotional rollercoaster ride for students and parents/guardians. �This session will explore developmental changes first year college students experience, particularly with today’s cultural influences, and discuss ways parents/guardians and University administrators can partner to help students manage the ride.

Question: �How many parents/guardians are sending their first child to college? �Of those who

Question: �How many parents/guardians are sending their first child to college? �Of those who have sent other children, how many of you noticed changes in their first year?

Who are they? �Are college students children or adults? �Do they consider themselves children

Who are they? �Are college students children or adults? �Do they consider themselves children or adults? �New term-Emerging Adulthood (Arnett, 2000) ◦ 18 -25 ◦ Become more independent and explore various life possibilities ◦ Can last until 30

Factors that can Have an Impact on Emerging Adulthood �“World’s Longest Umbilical Cord” –Dr.

Factors that can Have an Impact on Emerging Adulthood �“World’s Longest Umbilical Cord” –Dr. Richard Mullendore

Factors that can Have an Impact on Emerging Adulthood �Helicopter versus Snow Plow �Learned

Factors that can Have an Impact on Emerging Adulthood �Helicopter versus Snow Plow �Learned Helplessness �Lack of Self Efficacy �Cluttered Nest versus Empty Nest

Developing Competence �Intellectual/Academic ◦ Reading a syllabus ◦ Establishing a relationship with faculty ◦

Developing Competence �Intellectual/Academic ◦ Reading a syllabus ◦ Establishing a relationship with faculty ◦ Study habits and time management �Academic Resources ◦ Tutoring at the Study in Jenkins Hall (shift from being the tutor) ◦ Workshops on time management, note taking, and course management ◦ Writing Center in Maryland Hall to help with critical writing skills

Interpersonal/Social Competence �Question-How many of your students had their own rooms at home? �Difference

Interpersonal/Social Competence �Question-How many of your students had their own rooms at home? �Difference between siblings and roommates �Adjustment to communal living away from home �Successful communal living requires Civility, Communication, and Compromise �Cleanliness is also important

Interpersonal/Social Competence �Need to establish a new friend group and support network �Many are

Interpersonal/Social Competence �Need to establish a new friend group and support network �Many are leaving long-term friendships behind �“Get in where you fit in” �Need to balance free time and get involved in productive ways �Identity development and “sense of belonging”

Managing Emotions �One of the primary factors that leads to the conduct process �Still

Managing Emotions �One of the primary factors that leads to the conduct process �Still growing into emotional maturity �May look “grown up” but looks can be deceiving �Reminder of emerging adulthood �Venting versus asking for help

Managing Emotions �Brain is still developing well into 20 s �Need to understand, accept,

Managing Emotions �Brain is still developing well into 20 s �Need to understand, accept, and express emotions �Difficulty of face-to-face communication and impact of technology ◦ Stream of consciousness for the whole Internet �Dealing with anxiety, depression, and/or other mental health concerns

Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence �They are now in charge of their schedule full

Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence �They are now in charge of their schedule full time �For many of you, this used to be your job

Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence �They have to begin navigating their own challenges with

Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence �They have to begin navigating their own challenges with your support and guidance �Total independence is not the goal-Interdependence is key �What do you do when they call you with a problem?

How to Support Your Student �Help them brainstorm resources �Parents/guardians are powerful referral agents

How to Support Your Student �Help them brainstorm resources �Parents/guardians are powerful referral agents �Help them practice conversations �Resist the urge to immediately step in �Remind them of the resources in the Loyola community

Shared Goals �We want to partner with you �We often want the same things

Shared Goals �We want to partner with you �We often want the same things �We may have different methods �What is most beneficial for emerging adults? �Who is the best person to help this emerging adult? �Students have to begin to take ownership for their Loyola experience and learn to problem solve

Trust the Process!

Trust the Process!

References Arnett, J. J. (2000). Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late

References Arnett, J. J. (2000). Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late teens through the twenties. American Psychologist, 55(5), 469 -480. doi: 10. 1037/0003 -066 X. 55. 5. 469 � Batista, E. (2003, May 16). She’s gotta have it: Cell phone. Wired. Retrieved from http: //www. wired. com/news/culture/0, 1284, 58861, 00. html � Boyd, V. S. , Hunt, P. F. , Hunt, S. M. , Magoon, T. M. , & Van Brunt, J. E. (1997). Parents as referral agents for their first year college students: A retention intervention. Journal of College Student Development, 38(1), 83 -84. � Chickering, A. , & Reisser, L. (1993). Education and identity (2 nd ed. ). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. � Coburn, K. L. (2006, July/August). Organizing a ground crew for today’s helicopter parents. About Campus, 11(3), 9 -16. � Coburn, K. L. , & Treeger, M. L. (2003). Letting go: A parents’ guide to understanding the college years (4 th ed. ). New York, NY: Harper. Collins. �

References Daniel, B. V. , Evans, S. G. , & Scott, B. R. (2001).

References Daniel, B. V. , Evans, S. G. , & Scott, B. R. (2001). Understanding family involvement in the college experience today. New Directions for Student Services, Summer 2001(94), 3 -13. doi: 10. 1002/ss. 7 � Forbes, K. J. (2001, September/October). Students and their parents: Where do campuses fit in? About Campus, 6(4), 11 -17. � Gibbs, N. (2005, February 13). Parents behaving badly. Time. Retrieved from http: //www. time. com/time/magazine/article/0, 9171, 1027485 -1, 00. html � Howe, N. & Strauss, W. (2003). Millennials go to college: Strategies for a new generation on campus. Great Falls, VA: American Association of Collegiate Registrars. � Jackson, M. , & Murphy, S. (2005). Managing parent expectations: My how times have changed. In K. Keppler, R. Mullendore, and A. Carey (Eds. ), Partnering with the parents of today’s college students (pp. 53 -59). Washington, DC: NASPA. � Johnson, H. E. (2004, January 9). Educating parents about college life. The Chronicle of Higher Education, (50)18, pp. B 12 -B 13. �

References � � � � Lum, L. (2006). Handling “helicopter parents. ” Diverse Issues

References � � � � Lum, L. (2006). Handling “helicopter parents. ” Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 23 (20), 40 -43. Retrieved from http: //findarticles. com/p/articles/mi_m 0 WMX/is_20_23/ai_n 17093272/ Lythcott-Haims, J. (2015). How to raise an adult: Break free of the overparenting trap and prepare your kid for success. New York, NY: Henry Holt and Company. Merriman, L. S. (2007, November 23). It’s your child’s education, not yours. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 54(13) pp. B 20. Mullendore, R. H. , Banahan, L. A. , & Ramsey, J. L. (2005). Developing a partnership with today’s college parents. In K. Keppler, R. H. Mullendore, and A. Carey (Eds. ), Partnering with the parents of today’s college students (pp. 1 -10). Washington, DC: NASPA. Mullendore, R. H. , & Hatch, C. (2000). Helping your first-year college student succeed: A guide for parents. Columbia, SC: National Orientation Directors Association and the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition. Scott, B. R. , & Daniel, B. V. (2001). Why parents of undergraduates matter to higher education. New Directions for Student Services, Summer 2001(94), 83 -89. Shellenbarger, S. (2005, July 28). Tucking the kids in—in the dorm: Colleges ward off overinvolved parents. The Wall Street Journal, Retrieved from http: //online. wsj. com/article/0, , SB 112250452603298007, 00 -search. html

References Wartman, K. L. , & Savage, M. (2008). Parental involvement in higher education:

References Wartman, K. L. , & Savage, M. (2008). Parental involvement in higher education: Understanding the relationship among students, parents, and the institution. ASHE Higher Education Report, 33(6). San Francisco, CA: Wiley/Jossey-Bass. � Young, W. W. (2006). Parent expectations of collegiate teaching and caring. (Doctoral dissertation, University of Nebraska-Lincoln). Retrieved from http: //digitalcommons. unl. edu/cgi/viewcontent. cgi? article=1005&context=cehsdiss �