Lets Talk About Youth Restoring Connection Restoring Justice

  • Slides: 15
Download presentation
Let's Talk About You(th) Restoring Connection & Restoring Justice Pam Ferguson & Landon Turlock

Let's Talk About You(th) Restoring Connection & Restoring Justice Pam Ferguson & Landon Turlock

Objective Where traditional criminal justice only focuses on offenders, restorative justice seeks to repair

Objective Where traditional criminal justice only focuses on offenders, restorative justice seeks to repair the relationships between those whose actions have caused harm, the people affected, and the community. This session will focus on youth voices and positive ways to interact with youth who are navigating the criminal justice system.

Agenda Who We Are Restorative Justice Restoring Connection Small Groups Regroup Closing

Agenda Who We Are Restorative Justice Restoring Connection Small Groups Regroup Closing

Who We ARe The Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP) is a Youth Justice Committee

Who We ARe The Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP) is a Youth Justice Committee founded and run by Edmonton youth. YRAP is mandated to work with young people who have caused harm while being affected by a variety of significant social issues such as intolerance, racism, substance abuse, homelessness, family violence and prostitution. YRAP offers those who have caused harm an opportunity to take responsibility for their actions and to grow positively, and offers victims a meaningful role in the process. YRAP is the only justice committee worldwide with this unique mandate that is run entirely by youth members (aged 15 -24). YRAP was officially sanctioned as a justice committee in 2003 and has dealt with nearly 700 cases of all levels of severity.

Restorative Justice Criminal Justice ● ● Crime is a violation of the law and

Restorative Justice Criminal Justice ● ● Crime is a violation of the law and the state. Violations create guilt. Justice requires the state to determine blame (guilt) and impose pain {punishment). Central focus: offenders getting what they deserve. Restorative Justice ● ● Crime is a violation of people and relationships. Violations create obligations. Justice involves victims, offenders, and community members in an effort to put things right. Central focus: victim needs and offender responsibility for repairing harm.

Restorative Justice Three Different Questions Criminal Justice ● ● ● What laws have been

Restorative Justice Three Different Questions Criminal Justice ● ● ● What laws have been broken? Who did it? What do they deserve? Restorative Justice ● ● ● Who has been hurt? What are their needs? Whose obligations are these?

Restoring Connections - Rationale The importance of fostering positive relationships with young people has

Restoring Connections - Rationale The importance of fostering positive relationships with young people has been quite successful in numerous settings: ● ● ● Youth connecting with community resources can improve family functioning, peer relationships and self-reliance (Smith, Faulk & Sizer, 2016). Pairing mentors with youth gang members in Winnipeg saw decreases in recidivism and reduced crime severity in cases of recidivism (Weinrath, Donatelli & Murchison, 2016). Young people transitioning from detention settings to the community identified the value of positive relationships in this process (Moore, Mc. Arthur & Saunders, 2013).

Restoring Connections - Approaches Criminal activity or gang involvement can be resultant of young

Restoring Connections - Approaches Criminal activity or gang involvement can be resultant of young people seeking connection (Smith et al. , 2016). What are some general approaches that facilitate strong connection building when in a mentorship role with youth? ● ● Practice from a culturally aware perspective (Aschenbrener & Johnson, 2016). Incorporate a strengths-based lens (Aschenbrener & Johnson, 2016). Adopt a relational, mentorship approach even in traditionally more punitive settings (Marsh & Evans, as cited in Smith et al. , 2016). Foster multiple connections, including formal and informal supports (Moore, Mc. Arthur & Saunders, 2013).

Youth Voices “. . . everyone who makes decisions about young offenders doesn’t have

Youth Voices “. . . everyone who makes decisions about young offenders doesn’t have to live with them. I do. ” (Canada Department of Justice 2004, as cited in Hogeveen, 2006) “Hearing what young people need is an essential component to designing and implementing more effective responses to young people leaving youth detention. ” (Moore et al. , 2013)

Restoration in Action The ideas we have discussed so far today can be implemented

Restoration in Action The ideas we have discussed so far today can be implemented in a number of ways. Here are some ways that YRAP tries to incorporate them: ● ● ● Mentorship Panels Reports Program Creation Hiring Board Membership

Small Groups Question 3 Question 1 What are some ways a mentorship approach could

Small Groups Question 3 Question 1 What are some ways a mentorship approach could be implemented in your organization? What are other ways you might connect young people to positive supports? How can you apply a restorative lens to the work you do? What would be some challenges to this approach in your work? How could you overcome them? Question 2 How are youth voices currently integrated in your work or organization? How could you further include them?

Regroup What is a learning or reflection from your small group? What is one

Regroup What is a learning or reflection from your small group? What is one thing you will take away from this session?

Conclusion ● Fostering connections between young people and the community around them through mentorship

Conclusion ● Fostering connections between young people and the community around them through mentorship or a mentor approach can have many positive impacts on young people and the communities they live in. ● In our experience, building relationships with youth allows us to better incorporate their voices in a system where their voices are often ignored. ● How can you use the relationships you build with youth to foster connection and agency?

Contact Us Phone: 780 -970 -5126 Email: yrap@yrap. org Fax: 780 -420 -0805 Transition

Contact Us Phone: 780 -970 -5126 Email: [email protected] org Fax: 780 -420 -0805 Transition Centre Suite #101, 10010 105 Street Edmonton, AB T 5 J 1 C 4

References Aschenbrener, C. , & Johnson, S. (2017). Educationally-based, culturally-sensitive, theory-driven mentorship intervention with

References Aschenbrener, C. , & Johnson, S. (2017). Educationally-based, culturally-sensitive, theory-driven mentorship intervention with at-risk Native American Youth in South Dakota: A narrative review. Journal of Child & Family Studies, 26(1), 14 -27. doi: 10. 1007/s 10826 -016 -0537 -z Hogeveen, B. (2006). Unsettling youth justice and cultural norms: The Youth Restorative Action Project. Journal of Youth Studies, 9(1), 47 -66. doi: 10. 1080/13676260500523630 Mann-Feder, V. (2011). Aging out of care and the transition to adulthood: Implications for intervention. In Kufeldt, K. , & Mc. Kenzie, B. , (Eds. ), Connecting research, policy, and practice: Child welfare (2 nd ed. , 259 -266). Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Moore, T. , Mc. Arthur, M. , & Saunders, V. (2013). Young people talk about transitioning from youth detention to the community: Making good. Australian Social Work, 66(3), 328 -343. doi: 10. 1080/0312407 X. 2012. 752020 Smith, E. , Faulk, M. , & Sizer, M. (2016). Exploring the meso-system: The roles of community, family, and peers in adolescent delinquency and positive youth development. Youth & Society, 48(3), 318 -343. doi: 10. 1177/0044118 X 13491581 Weinrath, M. , Donatelli, G. , & Murchison, M. (2016). Mentorship: A missing piece to manage juvenile intensive supervision programs and youth gangs? Canadian Journal of Criminology & Criminal Justice, 58(3), 291 - 321. doi: 10. 3138/cjccj. 2015. E 19