Lesson 3 2 Subjects and Predicates A sentence

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Lesson 3 -2 Subjects and Predicates • A sentence consists of a subject and

Lesson 3 -2 Subjects and Predicates • A sentence consists of a subject and a predicate, which together express a complete thought. • Both a subject and a predicate may consist of more than one word. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 3 -3 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The complete subject includes all

Lesson 3 -3 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The complete subject includes all of the words in the subject of a sentence. • The complete predicate includes all of the words in the predicate of a sentence. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 3 -4 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • Not all of the words

Lesson 3 -4 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • Not all of the words in the subject or the predicate are of equal importance. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 3 -5 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The simple subject is the

Lesson 3 -5 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The simple subject is the main word or group of words in the complete subject. • The simple subject is usually a noun or a pronoun. • A noun is a word that names a person, a place, a thing, or an idea. • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 3 -6 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The simple predicate is the

Lesson 3 -6 (cont. ) Subjects and Predicates • The simple predicate is the main word or group of words in the complete predicate. • The simple predicate is always a verb. • A verb is a word that expresses an action or a state of being. • Sometimes the simple subject is also the complete subject. • Similarly, the simple predicate may also be the complete predicate. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 3 -7 Exercise 5 Identifying Complete Subjects and Predicates In each sentence, underline

Lesson 3 -7 Exercise 5 Identifying Complete Subjects and Predicates In each sentence, underline each complete subject once and each complete predicate twice. 1. My sister read The Witch of Blackbird Pond. 2. The book was written by Elizabeth George Speare. 3. It describes island life in the 1680 s. 4. A young girl is the main character. 5. Kit lived a life of luxury. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Lesson 3 -8 Exercise 6 Identifying Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates Underline the simple

Lesson 3 -8 Exercise 6 Identifying Simple Subjects and Simple Predicates Underline the simple subject and circle the simple predicate from each sentence. 1. Kit traveled far to meet her new family. 2. They were very different from Kit. 3. Kit’s new family worked very hard. 4. The colonists wore plain clothing. 5. Kit’s bright, colorful dresses shocked them. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Close. Lesson 3 Close Select a short passage from another text and list the

Close. Lesson 3 Close Select a short passage from another text and list the simple subjects and simple predicates of the sentences. Trade papers with a partner and check each other’s work. Discuss any needed revisions.

End of Lesson 3 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

End of Lesson 3 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

Lesson Objectives 4 -1 • To identify subjects in normal and inverted sentences •

Lesson Objectives 4 -1 • To identify subjects in normal and inverted sentences • To identify and use the pronoun you as an understood subject in requests and commands Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Finding Lesson Subjects 4 -2 • Most statements begin with the subject. Click the

Finding Lesson Subjects 4 -2 • Most statements begin with the subject. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

4 -3 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • Other kinds of sentences, such as

4 -3 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • Other kinds of sentences, such as questions, may begin with part or all of the predicate. • The subject comes next, followed by the rest of the predicate. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

4 -4 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • To locate the subject of a

4 -4 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • To locate the subject of a question, rearrange the words to form a statement. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

4 -5 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • Sometimes statements may have inverted word

4 -5 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • Sometimes statements may have inverted word order. • In these sentences, the simple or complete predicate comes before the subject. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

4 -6 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • In requests and commands, the subject

4 -6 Finding Lesson Subjects (cont. ) • In requests and commands, the subject is usually not stated. • The word you is understood to be the subject. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 4 -7 Exercise 7 Rewriting Questions as Statements Rewrite each question as a

Lesson 4 -7 Exercise 7 Rewriting Questions as Statements Rewrite each question as a statement. Underline each complete subject. 1. Did Robinson build a house? Robinson built a house. 2. Did the goats on the island provide fresh milk? The goats on the island provided fresh milk. 3. Did Robinson plant corn on the island? Robinson planted corn on the island. 4. Did the stranded man carve a canoe out of a tree? The stranded man carved a canoe out of a tree. 5. Was the weather favorable? The weather was favorable. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Lesson 4 -8 Exercise 8 Finding Subjects Underline each subject. Write (You) for any

Lesson 4 -8 Exercise 8 Finding Subjects Underline each subject. Write (You) for any sentence with an understood subject. 1. Did a parrot learn English from Robinson? 2. Many years passed before Robinson’s rescue. 3. Did the time pass slowly without a clock? 4. Robinson explored every part of the island. 5. Read the last chapter for homework. (You) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Close. Lesson 4 Close Write a sentence with inverted word order, either a question

Close. Lesson 4 Close Write a sentence with inverted word order, either a question or a statement. Exchange papers with a partner and rewrite your partner’s sentence in normal word order. Check each other’s work and discuss any needed changes.

End of Lesson 4 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

End of Lesson 4 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

Lesson Objectives 5 -1 • To identify compound subjects and compound predicates • To

Lesson Objectives 5 -1 • To identify compound subjects and compound predicates • To use compound subjects and compound predicates correctly and effectively Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 5 -2 and Compound Subjects Predicates • Some sentences have more than one

Lesson 5 -2 and Compound Subjects Predicates • Some sentences have more than one subject. • A compound subject is two or more subjects that have the same predicate. • The subjects are joined by and, or but. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 5 -3 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • Other sentences have more

Lesson 5 -3 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • Other sentences have more than one predicate. • A compound predicate is two or more verbs that have the same subject. • The verbs are joined by and, or but. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 5 -4 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • Some sentences have both

Lesson 5 -4 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • Some sentences have both a compound subject and a compound predicate. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 5 -5 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • When a sentence has

Lesson 5 -5 and Compound Subjects Predicates (cont. ) • When a sentence has three or more subjects or three or more predicates, the word that joins the compound parts usually comes before only the last subject or predicate. • Notice the position of and in the sentence below. – Velázquez, El Greco, and Picasso are three famous Spanish painters. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Lesson 5 -6 Exercise 9 Identifying Compound Subjects and Predicates In the sentences below,

Lesson 5 -6 Exercise 9 Identifying Compound Subjects and Predicates In the sentences below, underline the compound subjects and circle the compound predicates. 1. Many authors and artists have varied interests. 2. Elizabeth Borton de Treviño researched and wrote the book I, Juan de Pareja. 3. She studied violin and worked at a newspaper. 4. She and Juan knew and valued hard work. 5. Illness and poverty made Juan very weak. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Close. Lesson 5 Close Why do writers use compound subjects and compound predicates? Jot

Close. Lesson 5 Close Why do writers use compound subjects and compound predicates? Jot down in your journal a reminder that summarizes the value of compound structures in writing.

End of Lesson 5 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

End of Lesson 5 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

Lesson Objectives 6 -1 • To identify and use simple, complex, and compound sentences

Lesson Objectives 6 -1 • To identify and use simple, complex, and compound sentences • To identify and correct run-on sentences in writing Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

6 -2 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences • A compound sentence is a

6 -2 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences • A compound sentence is a sentence that contains two or more simple sentences. • Each simple sentence in a compound sentence is called a main clause. • A clause is a group of words containing a subject and a predicate. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

6 -3 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • Besides a main

6 -3 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • Besides a main clause, some sentences have a subordinate clause, one that cannot stand alone as a sentence. • A complex sentence is a sentence that has one main clause and one or more subordinate clauses. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

6 -4 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • When a subordinate

6 -4 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • When a subordinate clause is not necessary for the sentence to make sense, it is separated from the main clause by a comma or commas. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

6 -5 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • A run-on sentence

6 -5 Simple, Lesson Compound, and Complex Sentences (cont. ) • A run-on sentence is two or more sentences incorrectly written as one sentence. • Notice the way run-on sentences may be corrected. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Identifying Simple and Compound Lesson 6 -6 Exercise 10 Sentences Write whether each of

Identifying Simple and Compound Lesson 6 -6 Exercise 10 Sentences Write whether each of the following sentences is simple or compound. 1. Nat and his family valued a good education. simple 2. His family had little money; he frequently worried about them. compound 3. The boy found a job and worked in a supply store for a while. simple 4. Nat read about sailing, or he studied mathematics. compound 5. Will Nat read about the stars, study navigation, and go to sea? simple Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Identifying Compound, Complex, Lesson 6 -7 Exercise 11 and Run-on Sentences Write whether each

Identifying Compound, Complex, Lesson 6 -7 Exercise 11 and Run-on Sentences Write whether each of the following sentences is compound, complex, or run-on. 1. The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle describes an adventure that takes place at sea. complex 2. Charlotte was brought up as a proper young lady she attended boarding school in England. run-on 3. She returned to America her voyage to her home would not be an easy one. run-on Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Identifying Compound, Complex, Lesson 6 -8 Exercise 11 and Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Write

Identifying Compound, Complex, Lesson 6 -8 Exercise 11 and Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Write whether each of the following sentences is compound, complex, or run-on. 4. Crew members wanted revenge on Captain Jaggery, who had treated them cruelly. complex 5. Charlotte spoke to the captain; she told him about the planned mutiny. compound Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Close. Lesson 6 Close Look at the sentences in Exercise 10 on page 308

Close. Lesson 6 Close Look at the sentences in Exercise 10 on page 308 of your textbook. Count the number of subjects and predicates in each sentence.

End of Lesson 6 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

End of Lesson 6 Click the mouse button to return to the Contents slide.

Grammar Review Subjects, Predicates, and 1 Sentences • In the passage from A Tree

Grammar Review Subjects, Predicates, and 1 Sentences • In the passage from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn on page 309 of your textbook, it is 1912, and eleven-year-old Francie Nolan plans to read every book in her local library. • As you read the passage, notice that it has been annotated to show some of the sentence elements and sentence structures covered in this unit. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Sentences 2 from Fragments Grammar. Writing Review: Exercise 1 The following sentences and sentence

Sentences 2 from Fragments Grammar. Writing Review: Exercise 1 The following sentences and sentence fragments are based on the passage from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Rewrite each fragment as a complete sentence. 1. She hoped to read a book a day. The first author was Abbott. 2. Some of the books interested Francie more than others. Those by Louisa Alcott were wonderful. 3. Francie read the books in alphabetical order. Was working her way through the B’s. She was working her way through the B’s. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Sentences 3 from Fragments Grammar. Writing Review (cont. ) Review: Exercise 1 The following

Sentences 3 from Fragments Grammar. Writing Review (cont. ) Review: Exercise 1 The following sentences and sentence fragments are based on the passage from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Rewrite each fragment as a complete sentence. 4. One day a week she allowed herself a treat. Were special. Saturdays were special. 5. Francie asked the librarian to recommend a book. Didn’t have to be in alphabetical order. Her Saturday book didn’t have to be in alphabetical order. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Subjects and Predicates Grammar. Identifying Review 4 in Questions Review: Exercise 2 Rewrite each

Subjects and Predicates Grammar. Identifying Review 4 in Questions Review: Exercise 2 Rewrite each question to form a statement. Then underline each complete subject once and each complete predicate twice. 1. Has Francie read the book before? Francie has read the book before. 2. Do Francie and the librarian like the book? Francie and the librarian like the book. 3. Does the girl choose a book for Sunday? The girl chooses a book for Sunday. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Subjects and Predicates Grammar. Identifying Review 5 in Questions (cont. ) Review: Exercise 2

Subjects and Predicates Grammar. Identifying Review 5 in Questions (cont. ) Review: Exercise 2 Rewrite each question to form a statement. Then underline each complete subject once and each complete predicate twice. 4. Can Francie read the book quickly? Francie can read the book quickly. 5. Have the girl’s parents encouraged her? The girl’s parents have encouraged her. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Kinds of Grammar. Identifying Review 6 Sentences Review: Exercise 3 The following paragraph gives

Kinds of Grammar. Identifying Review 6 Sentences Review: Exercise 3 The following paragraph gives some information about the author Avi, who wrote The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle. Write whether each sentence is declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, or imperative. 1. interrogative 1 Why do parents, teachers, and students all declarative praise 2. Avi’s novels? 2 As Avi himself said, “Most of all declarative I want them to enjoy a 3. good read. ” 3 His notably readable, award-winning novels include mystery, 4. declarative adventure, historical, and comic novels. 4 Imaginative, exclamatory fast-paced 5. plots capture the reader quickly. 5 How declarative exciting the books are! 66. Readers would be misled, interrogative however, if 7. that were all they expected. 7 What are Avi’s other goals as a writer for young people? Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

the Subject Grammar. Identifying Review 7 of a Sentence Review: Exercise 4 Underline the

the Subject Grammar. Identifying Review 7 of a Sentence Review: Exercise 4 Underline the simple subject from each sentence. 1. Avi was born in Manhattan in 1937. 2. His great-grandparents were writers. 3. In school Avi had difficulty with writing. 4. A learning disability caused him to misspell many words. 5. His teachers thought he was sloppy and inattentive. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Sentence 8 Fragments Grammar. Rewriting Review: Exercise 5 Turn the following sentence fragments into

Sentence 8 Fragments Grammar. Rewriting Review: Exercise 5 Turn the following sentence fragments into complete sentences by adding a complete subject or a complete predicate. 1. Adventure books for young readers. Read adventure books for young readers. 2. Faces great danger. Does he face great danger? 3. Life on the high seas. What an exciting life we’ll have on the high seas! 4. Climbs the rigging. The crew climbs the rigging. 5. Tells of strange lands. The Arabian Nights tells of strange lands. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display sample answers.

Simple 9 and Complete Grammar. Identifying Review Subjects and Predicates Review: Exercise 6 The

Simple 9 and Complete Grammar. Identifying Review Subjects and Predicates Review: Exercise 6 The following sentences tell about the author Louisa May Alcott. Underline the complete subject once and the complete predicate twice. Then circle the simple subject and the simple predicate. 1. Louisa May Alcott’s father ran schools unlike most others of the time. 2. Mr. Alcott used his liberal ideas in teaching his four daughters. 3. Louisa May Alcott wrote “rubbishy novels” under the name A. N. Barnard. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Simple 10 and Complete Grammar Identifying Review Subjects and Predicates (cont. ) Review: Exercise

Simple 10 and Complete Grammar Identifying Review Subjects and Predicates (cont. ) Review: Exercise 6 The following sentences tell about the author Louisa May Alcott. Underline the complete subject once and the complete predicate twice. Then circle the simple subject and the simple predicate. 4. She published her famous novel Little Women in 1869. 5. Alcott based the story of the March girls on her own family. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Compound Subjects Grammar Identifying Review 11 and Predicates Review: Exercise 7 In each sentence,

Compound Subjects Grammar Identifying Review 11 and Predicates Review: Exercise 7 In each sentence, if the sentence has a compound subject, draw a line under each subject. If the sentence has a compound predicate, draw two lines under each predicate. 1. Painters in Paris in the late-nineteenth century experimented with color and developed new techniques. 2. Rapid brushstrokes and dabs of color created the style of painting called Impressionism. 3. Light and color give Impressionist paintings their brilliance. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Compound Subjects Grammar Identifying Review 12 and Predicates (cont. ) Review: Exercise 7 In

Compound Subjects Grammar Identifying Review 12 and Predicates (cont. ) Review: Exercise 7 In each sentence, if the sentence has a compound subject, draw a line under each subject. If the sentence has a compound predicate, draw two lines under each predicate. 4. Impressionist artists escaped from the studio and captured the life of the streets and open air. 5. Monet, Degas, Pissarro, and Renoir were all important Impressionist painters. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 13 Sentences Review: Exercise 8 The following pairs

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 13 Sentences Review: Exercise 8 The following pairs of related simple sentences are about Francie and her family in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Combine each pair to form a compound or complex sentence. 1. Francie’s father works as a singing waiter. He can’t always find work. Francie’s father works as a singing waiter, but he can’t always find work. 2. Her mother cleans houses for a living. She also cooks the family’s meals. Her mother cleans houses for a living, and she also cooks the family’s meals. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 14 Sentences (cont. ) Review: Exercise 8 The

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 14 Sentences (cont. ) Review: Exercise 8 The following pairs of related simple sentences are about Francie and her family in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Combine each pair to form a compound or complex sentence. 3. On Saturdays the family eats a big dinner. They even have dessert. On Saturdays the family eats a big dinner, and they even have dessert. 4. Francie’s parents don’t have very much money. They work very hard to provide for their children. Francie’s parents don’t have very much money, but they work very hard to provide for their children. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 15 Sentences (cont. ) Review: Exercise 8 The

Compound and Complex Grammar Writing Review 15 Sentences (cont. ) Review: Exercise 8 The following pairs of related simple sentences are about Francie and her family in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Combine each pair to form a compound or complex sentence. 5. The family must save every spare penny. They won’t have enough money for their daily food. The family must save every spare penny, or they won’t have enough money for their daily food. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display a possible answer.

Run-on Sentences Grammar Correcting Review 16 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following run-on sentences

Run-on Sentences Grammar Correcting Review 16 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following run-on sentences by rewriting them as separate sentences or combining them, using a semicolon or a comma and the word and, or but. 1. Beatrix Potter wrote in the early twentieth century, her books for young children are now considered classics. Beatrix Potter wrote in the early twentieth century. Her books for young children are now considered classics. 2. She spent her summers in the country, she spent winters in London. She spent her summers in the country, but she spent winters in London. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 17 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 17 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following run-on sentences by rewriting them as separate sentences or combining them, using a semicolon or a comma and the word and, or but. 3. Potter’s summer experiences sparked her imagination she found life in the country exciting and vital. Potter’s summer experiences sparked her imagination. She found life in the country exciting and vital. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display a possible answer.

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 18 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 18 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following run-on sentences by rewriting them as separate sentences or combining them, using a semicolon or a comma and the word and, or but. 4. The Tale of Peter Rabbit was originally written as a letter to a child who was ill Potter added to the letter and sent it to a publisher. The Tale of Peter Rabbit was originally written as a letter to a child who was ill; Potter added to the letter and sent it to a publisher. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display a possible answer.

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 19 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following

Run-on Sentences (cont. ) Grammar Correcting Review 19 Review: Exercise 9 Correct the following run-on sentences by rewriting them as separate sentences or combining them, using a semicolon or a comma and the word and, or but. 5. The Beatrix Potter books are strong because of their common sense and humor they are exciting because of their action and adventure. The Beatrix Potter books are strong because of their common sense and humor. They are exciting because of their action and adventure. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display a possible answer.

Proofreading 20 Grammar Review: Exercise 10 The following passage is about the artist Pierre-Auguste

Proofreading 20 Grammar Review: Exercise 10 The following passage is about the artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, whose work appears on page 315 of your textbook. Rewrite the passage, correcting errors in spelling, capitalization, grammar, and usage. Add any missing punctuation. There are ten errors. 1 Best known for his cheerful scenes of everyday life, french artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841– 1919) was an Impressionist painter 2 The Impressionists tried to represent what they saw at one particular moment in time 3 They preferred to paint outdoors there subjects could sit in natural light. 4 Renoir frequently painted people outdoors, women and children were his favorite subjects. 5 In The Reading, for example, two young girls reads a book in a pretty, sunlit setting. 6 Like the passage from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, the painting show a childs’ love of reading. 7 Can you imagine yourself in this picture Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Proofreading (cont. ) Grammar Review 21 Review: Exercise 10 The following passage is about

Proofreading (cont. ) Grammar Review 21 Review: Exercise 10 The following passage is about the artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir, whose work appears on page 315 of your textbook. Rewrite the passage, correcting errors in spelling, capitalization, grammar, and usage. Add any missing punctuation. There are ten errors. 1 Best known for his cheerful scenes of everyday life, French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841– 1919) was an Impressionist painter. 2 The Impressionists tried to represent what they saw at one particular moment in time. 3 They preferred to paint outdoors so that their subjects could sit in natural light. 4 Renoir frequently painted people outdoors. Women and children were his favorite subjects. 5 In The Reading, for example, two young girls read a book in a pretty, sunlit setting. 6 Like the passage from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, the painting shows a child’s love of reading. 7 Can you imagine yourself in this picture?

Mixed Review 22 Grammar Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following the directions in

Mixed Review 22 Grammar Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following the directions in parentheses. 1. Monet spent the summer of 1869 at Bougival. Renoir spent that summer at Bougival also. (Write one simple sentence with a compound subject. ) Monet and Renoir spent the summer of 1869 at Bougival. 2. Did Renoir and Monet develop the broken-color technique that became known as Impressionism? (Rewrite the sentence as a declarative sentence. ) Renoir and Monet developed the broken-color technique that became known as Impressionism. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Mixed Review (cont. ) Grammar Review 23 Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following

Mixed Review (cont. ) Grammar Review 23 Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following the directions in parentheses. 3. Renoir traveled to Italy in 1880. He studied Renaissance painters there. (Write one simple sentence with a compound predicate. ) Renoir traveled to Italy in 1880 and studied Renaissance painters there. 4. Concentrated on drawing for several years after this trip. (Make the fragment into a sentence. ) Renoir concentrated on drawing for several years after this trip. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.

Mixed Review (cont. ) Grammar Review 24 Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following

Mixed Review (cont. ) Grammar Review 24 Review: Exercise 11 Revise each example, following the directions in parentheses. 5. He studied at Charles Gleyre’s studio. He was influenced by Edouard Manet. (Rewrite the pair as a compound sentence using and, but, or or. ) He studied at Charles Gleyre’s studio, but he was influenced by Edouard Manet. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display a possible answer.