Lecture 3 Analog and Digital Modulation Techniques By

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Lecture 3: Analog and Digital Modulation Techniques By: Adal ALashban 1

Lecture 3: Analog and Digital Modulation Techniques By: Adal ALashban 1

Modulation - Modulation The transmitter modifies the message signal into a form suitable for

Modulation - Modulation The transmitter modifies the message signal into a form suitable for transmission over the channel. - The modulation process involve two waves: - The baseband signal (called a Modulating Signal) and the Carrier Signal which is a sinusoid signal. - The output of the modulation process is called as the Modulated Signal. 2

Modulation 3

Modulation 3

Classification of Modulation Techniques Table-1: Type of Modulation Techniques 4

Classification of Modulation Techniques Table-1: Type of Modulation Techniques 4

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Analog Modulation Techniques - There are basically three type of analog modulation; schemes the

Analog Modulation Techniques - There are basically three type of analog modulation; schemes the amplitude modulation, the Frequency modulation and the phase modulation schemes which have in turn lot of class. - In case of the Amplitude Modulation there are several derivatives. 6

Classification of Analog Modulation Techniques Table-2: Classification of Analog Modulation Techniques 7

Classification of Analog Modulation Techniques Table-2: Classification of Analog Modulation Techniques 7

Digital Modulation Techniques - Provides more information capacity, high data security, quicker system availability

Digital Modulation Techniques - Provides more information capacity, high data security, quicker system availability with great quality communication. - There are many types of digital modulation techniques. 8

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK) is a type

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK) is a type of Amplitude Modulation which represents the binary data in the form of variations in the amplitude of a signal. - Any modulated signal has a high frequency carrier. - The binary signal when ASK modulated, gives a zero value for Low input while it gives the carrier output for High input. 9

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - The following figure represents ASK modulated waveform

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - The following figure represents ASK modulated waveform along with its input. - ASK modulation can be represented by following equation: s(t) = A*cos(2*π*fc*t) for Binary 1 s(t) = 0 for Binary 0 10

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - Advantage: Simplicity. - Disadvantage: ASK is very

1 - ASK (Amplitude Shift Keying) - Advantage: Simplicity. - Disadvantage: ASK is very susceptible to noise interference; noise usually (only) affects the amplitude, therefore ASK is the modulation technique most affected by noise. - Application: ASK is used to transmit digital data over optical fiber. 11

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) the frequency of

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) the frequency of the output signal will be either high or low, depending upon the input data applied. - Binary 1 and 0 is represented by two different carrier frequencies. - Figure depicts that binary 1 is represented by high frequency 'f 1' and binary 0 is represented by low frequency 'f 2'. 12

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - The following figure represents FSK modulated waveform

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - The following figure represents FSK modulated waveform along with its input. - Binary FSK can be represented by following equation: s(t) = A*cos(2*π*f 1*t) for Binary 1 s(t) = A*cos(2*π*f 2*t) for Binary 0 13

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - Advantage: FSK is less susceptible to errors

2 - FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) - Advantage: FSK is less susceptible to errors than ASK ; receiver looks for specific frequency changes over a number of intervals, so voltage (noise) spikes can be ignored. - Disadvantage: FSK spectrum is 2 x ASK spectrum. - Application: Over voice lines, in high-freq. radio transmission, etc. 14

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - Phase Shift Keying (PSK) The phase of

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - Phase Shift Keying (PSK) The phase of the output signal gets shifted depending upon the input. - These are mainly of two types, namely Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK), according to the number of phase shifts. - Binary 1 is represented by 180 degree phase of the carrier and binary 0 is represented by 0 degree phase of the RF carrier. 15

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - The following figure represents PSK modulated waveform

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - The following figure represents PSK modulated waveform along with its input. - Binary FSK can be represented by following equation: s(t) = A*cos(2*π*fc*t) for Binary 1 s(t) = A*cos(2*π*fc*t + π) for Binary 0 16

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - Advantage: PSK is less susceptible to errors

3 - PSK (Phase Shift Keying) - Advantage: PSK is less susceptible to errors than ASK, while it requires/occupies the same bandwidth as ASK. More efficient use of bandwidth (higher data-rate) are possible, compared to FSK. - Disadvantage: More complex signal detection / recovery process, than in ASK and FSK 17

Comparison between ASK, FSK and PSK 18

Comparison between ASK, FSK and PSK 18

4 - QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) A combination of

4 - QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) A combination of ASK and PSK. - Types: 16 -QAM, 64 -QAM, 128 -QAM, 265 -QAM, etc. - Advantage: Data rate = 2 bits per bit-interval. 19

4 - QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) - Original information stream is split into two

4 - QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) - Original information stream is split into two sequences that consist of odd and even symbols, e. g. BK and AK - AK sequence (in-phase comp) is modulated by cos(2*π*fc*t). - BK sequence (quadrature-phase comp) is modulated by sin(2*π*fc*t). 20

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5 - CPFSK (Continuous Phase Modulation) - Continuous Phase Modulation (CPFSK) Produced by modulation

5 - CPFSK (Continuous Phase Modulation) - Continuous Phase Modulation (CPFSK) Produced by modulation schemes like FSK and PSK can interfere with nearby channels (adjacent channel interference) or with other communications systems (co– channel interference). - It is important that modulation used to transmit information over the radio channels of a cellular phone network be bandwidth efficient. - Types: Minimum Shift Keying (MSK) and Gaussian MSK (GMSK). 22

Continuous Phase FSK - In conventional FSK, different frequencies are used to transmit different

Continuous Phase FSK - In conventional FSK, different frequencies are used to transmit different symbols, i. e. - In order to ensure phase continuity, the signals for a general CPFSK transmitter are defined as: 23

Continuous Phase FSK - Where: T is the symbol duration. ΘK is a constant

Continuous Phase FSK - Where: T is the symbol duration. ΘK is a constant over the interval. Chosen so that the phase of the signal is continuous at time k. T. 24

Any Questions? 25

Any Questions? 25